Drug Eruption Reference Manual, 1999

Overview

New and expanded state-of-the-art and color-illustrated edition of Dr. Jerome Litt's immensely popular, universally acclaimed reference book on drug eruptions. Published in large-format softcover binding with a full-color atlas section showing the most commonly encountered reactions, this 1999 edition catalogs more than 620 generic and over 1,100 trade-name drugs (cross-referenced for quick look-up) with their adverse cutaneous reactions: skin, hair, nails, mucous membranes, and others. New in the 1999 edition ...

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Overview

New and expanded state-of-the-art and color-illustrated edition of Dr. Jerome Litt's immensely popular, universally acclaimed reference book on drug eruptions. Published in large-format softcover binding with a full-color atlas section showing the most commonly encountered reactions, this 1999 edition catalogs more than 620 generic and over 1,100 trade-name drugs (cross-referenced for quick look-up) with their adverse cutaneous reactions: skin, hair, nails, mucous membranes, and others. New in the 1999 edition are pharmaceutical company names for trade-name drugs and a list of other, less common trade-name drugs from the U.S. and elsewhere. Also new are a list of classes of drugs, 50 new generic drugs that include Viagra (sildenafil), Zyprexa (olanzapine), Trovan (trovafloxacin), and others, and many new combination drugs, including Arthrotec, Lexxel, Lotrel, Tarka, Teczem, and more. The updated literature citations now include more than 19,000 references, many pre-Medline and some going back as far as 1922. This 1999 edition contains 305 references to adverse reactions from carbamazepine (Tegretol); 89 references to lupus erythematosus from hydralazine (Apresoline); 291 references to adverse reactions from procainamide (Pronestyl), 165 of which refer to lupus erythematosus; and thousands more. Indexed by both generic and proprietary drug names as well as by reaction patterns. Published annually.

The book contains color illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Robert B. Sigafoes, MD (Kaiser Permanente)
Description: This 1999 edition is updated with new drugs, references, and a new section on the classes of cutaneous drug reactions. Organized by generic name of the drug, in alphabetical order, six hundred drugs are cited, plus over one thousand brand name drugs with descriptions of their associated reactions involving the skin, hair, nails, and mucous membranes. Accompanying references, a color atlas, and separate descriptions of cutaneous drug reaction patterns are also included.
Purpose: The purpose, as stated by the author, is to describe and catalogue the cutaneous reactions to six hundred prescribed medications. His objective is worthy and very much needed, and this manual fulfills his stated purpose.
Audience: Although the author is probably writing primarily for the practicing dermatologist, this manual would also be helpful to internists, family practice specialists, pediatricians, emergency room physicians, interns, and residents — in short, any physician who prescribes a medication, and sees a patient return with a drug-related cutaneous reaction.
Features: The cutaneous reaction patterns to over 600 commonly prescribed generic drugs (more than 1000 proprietary name drugs) are catalogued in detail, and their frequency of occurrence is provided in percentages. Also provided are 19,000 current references. Organized in alphabetical order according to generic drug name, each heading also includes the many common trade names for the generic drug, the category of drug (antihypertensive, antidiuretic, etc.,) the drug half-life, plus clinically important, potentially serious drug interactions with other listed drugs. Another bonus is lists of non-cutaneous associated reactions (i.e., myalgia, myopathy, etc). The indexes are grouped according to generic and proprietary names for easy cross-referencing, and according to classes of drugs such as anticonvulsant, amphetamine, antifungal, etc. The conclusion is a description of the 29 most common cutaneous reaction patterns and a section listing all drugs responsible for 80 reaction patterns, followed by a seven-page color atlas of drug eruptions.
Assessment: For the practicing dermatologist, few problems are more daunting than the patient who presents a long list of medications and a cutaneous eruption that is clearly due to one of those medications. In the past, a tedious perusal of each medication in the Physician's Desk Reference was often not helpful in determining the offending medication. Now, with the annual publication of this manual, our task has been much simplified, and we should be indebted to the author for making our search easier. Beautifully cross referenced, and with detailed lists of all known cutaneous drug reactions to a particular medication, plus references, drug half-life, and even the manufacturer's name, this manual has become the Bible of cutaneous drug reactions. Sections on drug reaction patterns and the medications that are associated with those patterns, plus an excellent color atlas to illustrate those patterns, make the task of finding out which drug is causing our patient's problem less daunting. The offending agent can be stopped or substituted with another medication and our patient made well again more quickly, with the help of this manual. I highly recommend it for the office bookshelf of any dermatologist, primary care physician, pediatrician, or emergency room physician since these doctors see drug reactions more commonly, but it would also be helpful to any physician who prescribes medications for their patients and is concerned about what the cutaneous effects of that medication might be.
Robert B. Sigafoes
This 1999 edition is updated with new drugs, references, and a new section on the classes of cutaneous drug reactions. Organized by generic name of the drug, in alphabetical order, six hundred drugs are cited, plus over one thousand brand name drugs with descriptions of their associated reactions involving the skin, hair, nails, and mucous membranes. Accompanying references, a color atlas, and separate descriptions of cutaneous drug reaction patterns are also included. The purpose, as stated by the author, is to describe and catalogue the cutaneous reactions to six hundred prescribed medications. His objective is worthy and very much needed, and this manual fulfills his stated purpose. Although the author is probably writing primarily for the practicing dermatologist, this manual would also be helpful to internists, family practice specialists, pediatricians, emergency room physicians, interns, and residents — in short, any physician who prescribes a medication, and sees a patient return with a drug-related cutaneous reaction. The cutaneous reaction patterns to over 600 commonly prescribed generic drugs (more than 1000 proprietary name drugs) are catalogued in detail, and their frequency of occurrence is provided in percentages. Also provided are 19,000 current references. Organized in alphabetical order according to generic drug name, each heading also includes the many common trade names for the generic drug, the category of drug (antihypertensive, antidiuretic, etc.,) the drug half-life, plus clinically important, potentially serious drug interactions with other listed drugs. Another bonus is lists of non-cutaneous associated reactions (i.e., myalgia, myopathy, etc). Theindexes are grouped according to generic and proprietary names for easy cross-referencing, and according to classes of drugs such as anticonvulsant, amphetamine, antifungal, etc. The conclusion is a description of the 29 most common cutaneous reaction patterns and a section listing all drugs responsible for 80 reaction patterns, followed by a seven-page color atlas of drug eruptions. For the practicing dermatologist, few problems are more daunting than the patient who presents a long list of medications and a cutaneous eruption that is clearly due to one of those medications. In the past, a tedious perusal of each medication in the Physician's Desk Reference was often not helpful in determining the offending medication. Now, with the annual publication of this manual, our task has been much simplified, and we should be indebted to the author for making our search easier. Beautifully cross referenced, and with detailed lists of all known cutaneous drug reactions to a particular medication, plus references, drug half-life, and even the manufacturer's name, this manual has become the Bible of cutaneous drug reactions. Sections on drug reaction patterns and the medications that are associated with those patterns, plus an excellent color atlas to illustrate those patterns, make the task of finding out which drug is causing our patient's problem less daunting. The offending agent can be stopped or substituted with another medication and our patient made well again more quickly, with the help of this manual. I highly recommend it for the office bookshelf of any dermatologist, primary care physician, pediatrician, or emergency room physician since these doctors see drug reactions more commonly, but it would also be helpful to any physician who prescribes medications for their patients and is concerned about what the cutaneous effects of that medication might be.
Booknews
A compendium of drug eruptions cataloging adverse cutaneous side- effects of some 600 common prescription and non-prescription drugs. This edition lists some 1,200 trade name drugs and cites some 19,000 references for side effects, primarily those involving the skin, hair, nails, and mucous membranes. Information on some 50 new drugs is given in this edition. Also new are a section listing classes of drugs, names of manufacturers of brand name drugs, and a listing of American and European trade name drugs. Includes color photos. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

5 Stars! from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781850700760
  • Publisher: CRC Press
  • Publication date: 2/28/1999
  • Edition number: 5
  • Pages: 588

Table of Contents

Introduction. Alphabetical list of generic names. Alphabetical list of trade/generic names. Various classes of drugs. Drug eruptions A-Z. Descriptions of 29 common reaction patterns in alphabetical order. Drug eruptions illustrated. Drugs responsible for 80 reaction patterns in alphabetical order.

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