Dry Diplomacy

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$24.95
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $23.84
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 4%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (6) from $23.84   
  • New (6) from $23.84   

Overview

The Eighteenth Amendment and the Volstead Act of 1920 would transform American life, giving birth to the Roaring '20s with its bathtub gin, speakeasies, and booze-running gangsters. Yet, as Lawrence Spinelli so clearly shows, the prohibition of the manufacture, sales, and transport of alcohol would have wider repercussions. In a world of international relations deeply unsettled after what was thought to be the War to End All Wars, the crusade for temperance on the American home front would disrupt the critical Anglo-American alliance.

Dry Diplomacy is the first complete treatment of the diplomatic ramifications of prohibition. Spinelli explores the widespread effects on international law, shipping, foreign policy, and trade. In this context, American interests appeared to be pitted against those of Britain as she sought to recover from the First World War by expanding trade, promoting domestic industries such as whiskey distilling, and reasserting shipping dominance in the sea lanes. American interference with international shipping—in order to disrupt what Presidents Harding and Coolidge deemed British alcohol smuggling—would lead to a diplomatic crisis in the mid-1920s.

Drawing on international archives such as the Cunard Archives and the records of the U.S. Justice Department, Spinelli digs deep into an important chapter of American "independent internationalism."

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

American Historical Review
Based on extensive research, Dry Diplomacy shows an important linkage between domestic and foreign affairs during this era. . . . Spinelli examines a feature of Anglo-American relations that has been largely ignored by historians. . . . Spinelli's book is a welcome contribution to the literature on drug smuggling—in this instance, liquor—in international relations.
Journal of American History
Dry Diplomacy takes Prohibition out of its domestic context and projects it into the international sphere. . . . Spinelli's study is engagingly written and comprehensively researched in both American and British archives. It provides valuable insights into the history of Prohibition, Anglo-American relations, and United States shipping policy, and it should be welcomed as a significant contribution to the historical literature of the interwar period.
Journal Of American History
Dry Diplomacy takes Prohibition out of its domestic context and projects it into the international sphere. . . . Spinelli's study is engagingly written and comprehensively researched in both American and British archives. It provides valuable insights into the history of Prohibition, Anglo-American relations, and United States shipping policy, and it should be welcomed as a significant contribution to the historical literature of the interwar period.
Daniel Okrent
Of all the aspects of American life and politics that were changed by the 18th Amendment, relations between the United States and its closest ally might have been the least likely arena for disruption. But as Lawrence Spinelli shows in his absolutely authoritative and often fascinating book, 'disruption' doesn't begin to describe it. Dry Diplomacy is an excellent piece of research and analysis.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780742560789
  • Publisher: The Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group Inc
  • Publication date: 11/1/2007
  • Series: America in the Modern World Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 200
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.46 (d)

Meet the Author

Lawrence Spinelli is director of public affairs at the Overseas Private Investment Corporation. He spent over a decade on Capitol Hill as a policy and communications director for three members of Congress and has been assistant professor of political science at Drew University and a lecturer at American University.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: The British Connection: Liquor Smuggling and the Bahamas, 1919–1923
Chapter 2: American Uncertainty: The Harding Administration and Prohibition Enforcement, 1921–1923
Chapter 3: "Puritanism Run Mad": Shipping and Prohibition, 1919–1923
Chapter 4: Limited Options: The American Treaty Proposal, May–July 1923
Chapter 5: A New Prospective: Negotiating the Anglo-American Liquor Treaty, July 1923–May 1924
Chapter 6: An Unresolved Problem: Post-Treaty Entanglements, 1924–1926
Chapter 7: Making the Treaty Work: The London Conference, 1926–1928
Chapter 8: A Surprising Finale: Canada, Hoover, and the Burdens of Repeal, 1929–1940
Conclusion

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)