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Dub Plate Style
     

Dub Plate Style

by Delroy Wilson
 

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Delroy Wilson began his singing career as a teenager at Clement Dodd's Studio One (where seemingly everyone in the Jamaican music business appears to have started out), eventually working with nearly every producer on the island, including Sonia Pottinger, Joe Gibbs,

Overview

Delroy Wilson began his singing career as a teenager at Clement Dodd's Studio One (where seemingly everyone in the Jamaican music business appears to have started out), eventually working with nearly every producer on the island, including Sonia Pottinger, Joe Gibbs, Winston "Niney" Holness, Keith Hudson, Leslie Kong, and Bunny Lee. As he matured, Wilson's voice rounded into a hoarse, smoky tenor that was as soulful a vehicle as Jamaica ever produced, and although he isn't as well known as later singers like Dennis Brown and Gregory Isaacs, his approach and phrasing influenced them all, even Bob Marley. Sort of Jamaica's Marvin Gaye (or perhaps Al Green), Wilson was pivotal in moving the island's music toward its brilliant, skewed, upside-down version of American soul, and his warm, assured phrasing is the equal of any Motown or Stax star. Arguably his peak work came with producer Bunny Lee, who helmed such classics as "Better Must Come," "Cool Operator," and "Here Come the Heartaches." Even at that, this unique 20-track gem is a thing apart in Wilson's recorded legacy. Originally released in 1978 under the title Twenty Golden Greats and aimed directly at Jamaica's dancehall sound systems, this wonderful album consists of remixes by Prince Jammy that feature a deep, raw, and sparse sound perfectly complementing Wilson's fine vocals, freeing them to float intimately over a partially dubbed-out landscape. The original album appeared on the London-based Third World imprint, sold sparingly, and was never actually released in Jamaica, quickly fading from the shelves and becoming a highly sought-after collector's item. This reissue is therefore a treat, and it presents Wilson in the best possible light. Jammy's sonic reinterpretations give songs like "I'm Still Waiting," "Better Must Come," "Here Come the Heartaches," and "Do Good (Everyone Will Be Judged)" a layer of timeless depth, with Wilson's smoky vocals sounding like they're floating out of a sort of dubplate ocean. Thanks to Pressure Sounds for bringing this classic album back to life again.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/25/2009
Label:
Pressure Sounds
UPC:
0689492092726
catalogNumber:
920927

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Delroy Wilson   Primary Artist
Ansel Collins   Keyboards
Glen Adams   Keyboards
Lloyd "Tinleg" Adams   Drums
Gladstone Anderson   Keyboards
Aston Barrett   Bass
Carlton "Carly" Barrett   Drums
Lennox Brown   Alto Saxophone
Carlton "Santa" Davis   Drums
Sly Dunbar   Drums
Bobby Ellis   Trumpet
Winston Grennan   Drums
Bernard Touter Harvey   Keyboards
Ossie Hibbert   Keyboards
Earl Lindo   Keyboards
Tommy McCook   Tenor Saxophone
Jackie Mittoo   Keyboards
Robbie Shakespeare   Bass
Noel "Scully" Simms   Percussion
Earl "Chinna" Smith   Guitar
Uziah "Sticky" Thompson   Percussion
Winston Wright   Keyboards
Alva Lewis   Guitar
Bobby Aitken   Guitar
Herman Davis   Percussion
Albert Valentine "Tony" Chin   Guitar
Winston "Bo Peep" Bowen   Guitar
Alvin Reggie Lewis   Guitar
Lorraine "Ronny Bop" Williams   Guitar
Lynford Hux Brown   Guitar
Bobby Aitken   Guitar
Lowell "Sly" Dunbar   Drums

Technical Credits

Ernest Hoo Kim   Engineer
Lloyd James   Remixing
Bunny Lee   Arranger,Producer,Photo Courtesy
Carlton Lee   Engineer
Sylvan Morris   Engineer
Errol Thompson   Engineer
Pete Holdsworth   Liner Notes
Ben Bailey   Artwork

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