Dubliners

Dubliners

4.2 415
by James Joyce
     
 

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A collection of 15 short stories first published in 1914.

The Sisters – After the priest Father Flynn dies, a young boy who was close to him and his family deal with it only superficially.
An Encounter – Two schoolboys playing truant encounter an elderly man.
Araby – A boy falls in love with the sister of his friend, but fails in

Overview

A collection of 15 short stories first published in 1914.

The Sisters – After the priest Father Flynn dies, a young boy who was close to him and his family deal with it only superficially.
An Encounter – Two schoolboys playing truant encounter an elderly man.
Araby – A boy falls in love with the sister of his friend, but fails in his quest to buy her a worthy gift from the Araby bazaar.
Eveline – A young woman abandons her plans to leave Ireland with a sailor.
After the Race – College student Jimmy Doyle tries to fit in with his wealthy friends.
Two Gallants – Two con men, Lenehan and Corley, find a maid who is willing to steal from her employer.
The Boarding House – Mrs. Mooney successfully manoeuvres her daughter Polly into an upwardly mobile marriage with her lodger Mr. Doran.
A Little Cloud – Little Chandler's dinner with his old friend Ignatius Gallaher casts fresh light on his own failed literary dreams. The story reflects also on Chandler's mood upon realizing his baby son has replaced him as the centre of his wife's affections.
Counterparts – Farrington, a lumbering alcoholic Irish scrivener, takes out his frustration in pubs and on his son Tom.
Clay – The old maid Maria, a laundress, celebrates Halloween with her former foster child Joe Donnelly and his family.
A Painful Case – Mr. Duffy rebuffs Mrs. Sinico, then four years later realizes he has condemned her to loneliness and death.
Ivy Day in the Committee Room – Minor Irish politicians fail to live up to the memory of Charles Stewart Parnell.
A Mother – Mrs. Kearney tries to win a place of pride for her daughter, Kathleen, in the Irish cultural movement, by starring her in a series of concerts, but ultimately fails.
Grace – After Mr. Kernan injures himself falling down the stairs in a bar, his friends try to reform him through Catholicism.
The Dead – Gabriel Conroy attends a party, and later, as he speaks with his wife, has an epiphany about the nature of life and death. At 15–16,000 words this story has also been classified as a novella. The Dead was adapted to film by John Huston, written for the screen by his son Tony and starring his daughter Anjelica as Mrs. Conroy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013230705
Publisher:
DB Publishing House
Publication date:
10/05/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
201
File size:
583 KB

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Dubliners 4.2 out of 5 based on 2 ratings. 415 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dublin at the turn of the nineteenth century is this book's source of inspiration. Joyce here captures a sense of sadness, a sense of folly, and a sense of unsatisfaction in this collection of short stories. Fourteen were intended by Joyce for The Dubliners, and in this Bantom Books Reprint, the lyrically written, but awkwardly structured 'The Dead' has been included (it reads in two seemingly incongruent parts). My notables include 'A Mother', 'A Little Cloud', and 'Counterparts'. 'The Dead' is hailed by the literati as a great piece, and the second half of the story captures the distance that can occur in a marriage, the effects of a perceived affair on a husband and a woman's longing for what could have been if she'd married differently. This collection of stories is compulsory for any James Joyce reader, as it is a sharp contrast in style to Finnegan's Wake or Ulysses. I find the value in it, if one wants to be absolutely immersed in a different time and place, and read some passionately painful, realistic stories. The morals of these stories can be interpreted open-endedly, like most great art, and at times may be too subtle for the modern reader. One drawback to this edition. Shame on Bantam for not presenting the punctuation as Joyce intended. He originally demarcates his changed in dialogue with dashes, rather than standard quotation mark indicators. What is the point of reading the book how the author did not intend it read? Read the book, but choose an edition true to the author's intent.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dubliners is a wonderful masterpiece that is insightful and cascades with beauty through its words splashed upon the pages. My personal favorite story is 'The Dead' which is Joyce's transition from his more simplistic writing into what will later become his stream of conciousness and deeply imbedded symbolism style of writing that we see in Ulysses. I recommend this to anyone. Some of the short stories are easier to read than others, but there shouldn't be any great trouble in any of them. Each story has its unique beauty and truth about the human race.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Dubliners is a revelation into the dark side of human reasoning. It¿s a smashing book, when you are done with it you understand why people do stupid things, drink excessively or gamble (the reasoning behind it). This book is a benchmark in literary competence that everyone should read. I love this book because it gives the perspective of the lower class of Dublin children skipping school, alcoholics exedra. James Joyce has exceeded the expectations for word choice of the finest writers. It is a book of short, stories each chapter gives a different perspective of the same day in Dublin. James Joyce also wrote the Odyssey which by many standards is the hardest book to understand (in English) and is legendary for its complexity. The Dubliners retains all the richness and word of the Odyssey but everyone can (should) understand.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the second James Joyce book I have read and it goes to reinforce the feeling I had after reading the first that that writer is a great storyteller. In fact, I consider James Joyce's Dubliners as one of the best collection of short stories ever put together. The settings are amazing and the rich and lively characters all combine with the incredible plots to add credence to the stories. Not only are they true to life in fitting with the atmosphere that one finds in Dublin, the stories are also hilarious, subtle, and inspirational and gripping. The pace of the stories is fast and the voices are rich.
CalesG More than 1 year ago
I had to read this book for my AP Literature class, but I ended up buying my own copy to keep notes in..and also because I liked it so much. I loved the message that Joyce was trying to portray with this novel: Dublin (and society as a whole) was stuck in a never-ending circle, paralyzed if you will, of drinking, passionless love and lives, materialism, meaningless faith, etc. I had never read something quite like this before, and I loved the creative grouping of the chapters into a timeline type thing. My favorite chapter was Evelyn. All in all, it was a pretty good read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A GREAT book. If it were a good book it would show this dank, depressive, captivating and surreal world. Instead it emerses you in this world. Joyce's writing is so spontaneous. I despise being gushing but it is Joyce. The man is a genius. (I realise I should refer to him in the past tense but his writing seems to suspened his intellect and reality in time). He never resorts to the writing-by-numbers tecnique of presenting characters with a view to evoking sympathetic sentiments from the reader. Characters aren't pleasant so that you want to be their friend or unsuccesful/destructive/pathetic for the purpose of making the reader feel smug, successful and sensible. I can't recommend this book enough. It's an experience. One which you may find tiring and depressing but which is completely worthwhile. And compared to Finnegans Wake it's a walk in the park! Allows you to experience Joyce's writing without completely perplexing you (speaking from experience!)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Barnes and Noble needs to kick out all of the people that are posting solicitations and personal chats. This is for reviews of authors and books only.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Maximum walked in, smirking a bit.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hey yall
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mia To Alex: I will ASAP 3: I thought you guys forgot about meee :D I feel much better now! I'll try to be back by either tomorrow or Wednesday!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mia To All (and the Dustin dude): So, like, I miss you guys so FRIKKIN much! By everyone I mean bw, carrie, alex, doc.... You other newbies can suck it :3 But still, I lost mah nook but Im gun find it 'cause I miss being on here... PS Dustin, Delilah says "Hi"
RogerGPerkins More than 1 year ago
Added this to my collection because I remember enjoying it very much as the focus of a literature course at the university in the late 1950's or early 1960s. Joyce captures the essence of every day people doing every day things. Modern Library Series has been my source for so many classics.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bw? -DOC
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Looked at him
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ok so will u?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ohmygod Alex.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's not hanging on at all. It is dead.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Tell Riker to get on sometime.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I havent given up yet. I still love you Nonnie...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Oops wrong name xD<p>
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mer.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
HER NOOK BROKE SHE WONT BE ON FOR A WHILE. <p> ~ Ellie.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wals in