The Duck and The Kangaroo

The Duck and The Kangaroo

5.0 1
by Edward Lear, Jane Wattenberg
     
 

Meet Duck.

Duck has a yen for travel and adventure. Duck also has some very wet, cold feet and a gift for loyalty and compromise.

Meet Kangaroo.

Kangaroo has been around the world and back, and is looking for a little bit of luck.

Or a duck.

When Duck and Kangaroo meet, it’s a match made in . . . heaven.

Ah, love—ain’t it

Overview

Meet Duck.

Duck has a yen for travel and adventure. Duck also has some very wet, cold feet and a gift for loyalty and compromise.

Meet Kangaroo.

Kangaroo has been around the world and back, and is looking for a little bit of luck.

Or a duck.

When Duck and Kangaroo meet, it’s a match made in . . . heaven.

Ah, love—ain’t it grand?

And who so happy,—O who, As the Duck and the Kangaroo?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
04/27/2015
Images sampled from artists like John James Audubon, Charles Darwin, and Lear himself accompany this classic poem to create an overall visual effect that is far from naturalistic. The duck and kangaroo—which Wattenberg (Never Cry Woof) photographed at the San Francisco Zoo and in Australia, respectively—who have superimposed cartoon eyes, are juxtaposed against a neon backdrop of assorted flora and fauna, creating an explosive, whimsical collage (massive stalks of asparagus appear as marsh grasses, and ink-drawn b&w animals congregate with more photo-real specimens by a shore). When the duck implores, "Please give me a ride on your back!/ ... I would sit quite still, and say nothing but ‘Quack,'/ The whole of the long day through," the kangaroo's sole reservation—the duck's "unpleasantly wet and cold" feet—is solved by a pair of blue "worsted socks." The duo hop around the world, under giant golden grapes, past a backdrop of Technicolor sea cliffs, and through an icy mountain landscape framed with blossoming branches. The groovy assemblage of artistic styles pays fitting homage to the unlikely—but starry-eyed—pair. Ages 2—5. (Oct)
Booklist
“Masterful…Wattenberg’s quirky photo collages are perfectly suited for Lear’s nonsensical text.”
School Library Journal
K-Gr 6—Lavishly illustrated collages using photographs and painted images by more than 20 world-renowned Naturalists help to bring Lear's nonsense poem to life. Marvelously detailed insects, birds, reptiles, and botanical prints grace the pages in this rhyming tale of the love between a duck and a kangaroo. The mallard, tired of pond life and longing to see the world, begs to be taken for a ride. Kangaroo has only one objection: "'Which is, if you'll let me speak so bold,/Your feet are unpleasantly wet and cold,/And would probably give me the roo-Matiz!' (O my achy bones, that is) said the Kangaroo." So, with Duck wearing a crocheted cloak and worsted socks humorously knitted to fit webbed feet, the two take off on their adventures around the world. The various poses of the photographed kangaroo and duck add to the humor of the preposterous but sweet relationship. And Duck's yellow eyes speak volumes: longing, chagrin, and love for Kangaroo. This title's delightfully silly verse, paired perfectly with elaborate pictures to scrutinize, should not be missed.—Maryann H. Owen, Racine Public Library, WI
Kirkus Reviews
A lesser-known romantic lyric from the author of "The Owl and the Pussycat" is set to suitably wild photo-collage illustrations. Aching to see what lies beyond "this nasty pond," Duck begs for a ride aboard Kangaroo-answering Kangaroo's objections to Duck's cold, wet feet thusly: " . . . I have thought over that completely, / And I bought four pairs of worsted socks / Which fit my web-feet neatly. / And to keep out the cold I've bought a cloak, / And every day a cigar I'll smoke, / All to follow my own dear true / Love of a kangaroo!" Off they go "with a hop and a bound, / And they hopped the whole world three times round." Wattenberg endows her animal figures with comically expressive googly eyes and sets the courtship amid riotous multiple layers of exotic flora and fauna Photoshopped from an array of 19th-century Naturalist painters-including Lear himself-along with photos of custom-made duck socks and other silly items. Top marks for visual exuberance; this is the first separate edition of the verses available in this country in decades. (illustrator's notes) (Picture book. 6-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061366833
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/29/2009
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.20(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Edward Lear (1812-1888) was an author and illustrator who popularized limericks and is perhaps best known for his poem "The Owl and the Pussycat."

Jane Wattenberg is the creator of many books for young readers, including Mrs. Mustard's Baby Faces, Mrs. Mustard's Beastly Babies, Henny-Penny, and Never Cry Woof!, as well as the illustrator of This Is the Rain, by Lola M. Schaefer. She got her first camera as a young child and found her first experience in a darkroom, at age seventeen, thrilling. Since then, photography has been her passion. She photographed the kangaroo in this book in Australia, and the duck at the San Francisco Zoo.

Jane Wattenberg lives with her husband in San Francisco, California, where she raised three sons and now raises chickens and harvests honey from her own beehives.

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Duck and the Kangaroo 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
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