The Duck That Won the Lottery: 100 New Experiments for the Armchair Philosopher

Overview


From the author of the "hugely entertaining"(Publishers Weekly) The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten, lessons in debunking the faulty arguments we hear every day

This latest book from the pop philosophy author of The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten tackles an endlessly fascinating area of popular debate-the faulty argument. Julian Baggini provides a rapid-fire selection of short, stimulating, and entertaining quotes from a wide range of famous people in politics, the media, and ...

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Overview


From the author of the "hugely entertaining"(Publishers Weekly) The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten, lessons in debunking the faulty arguments we hear every day

This latest book from the pop philosophy author of The Pig That Wants to Be Eaten tackles an endlessly fascinating area of popular debate-the faulty argument. Julian Baggini provides a rapid-fire selection of short, stimulating, and entertaining quotes from a wide range of famous people in politics, the media, and entertainment, including Donald Rumsfeld, Emma Thompson, Tony Blair, Bill Clinton, and Chris Martin. Each entry takes as its starting point an example of highly questionable-though oddly persuasive-reasoning from a broad variety of subjects. As Baggini teases out the logic in the illogical, armchair philosophers and aficionados of the absurd will find themselves nodding their heads as they laugh out loud. The Duck That Won the Lottery is perfect fodder for any cocktail party and pure pleasure for anyone who loves a good brain twister.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Bad arguments are the meat and potatoes of most informal discussions, but you don't have to take them anymore. Julian Baggini's The Duck That Won the Lottery identifies and defuses no fewer than 100 misleading leaps commonly taken in verbal skirmishes. As in his surprise bestseller The Pig that Wants to Be Eaten, Baggini covers the field; from scaremongering to "I Was Just Doing My Job!" (And let's not forget "Insensitivity to Context," "Flattery," and "You Can't Prove It!") His examples from Bill Clinton, Tony Blair, Donald Rumsfeld, Emma Thompson, and other luminaries show that nobody is immune from these gaffes.
Financial Times

"Jullian Baggini has come to the rescue...the prolific philosopher's latest work is a curiosity cabinet of spurious reasoning and spin"
Financial Times
"Jullian Baggini has come to the rescue...the prolific philosopher's latest work is a curiosity cabinet of spurious reasoning and spin"
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780452295414
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 4/28/2009
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 773,798
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author


Julian Baggini is the editor of The Philosopher’s Magazine.
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 8 of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 11, 2011

    Average

    I initially had very high expectations for this book. Reading a couple descriptions, I was eager to learn more about the everyday fallacies we encounter everyday. As I started reading about the first 50 pages, I found it somewhat dry, there was definitely something missing that would keep a reader interested. Baggini did his research very extensively and supported each of his fallacies, nevertheless since there is no specific storyline, some of the information is just simply stated to be stated. Do not get me wrong, I learned about probably every fallacy that there is out there through this book, but the fact that some of the fallacies just did not exactly stand out to me, made me quickly forget a lot of the information. Although now I can pick out certain arguments politicians make that are just clearly incorrect. If one really wants to improve the way they process information from the media and to learn to think critically, this book may help, but not leave a lasting impact.

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  • Posted March 19, 2011

    not what i expected

    This book's main point was to increase your potential while in arguments. I thought it would be more interesting than most other topics because, everyone argues daily, if not hourly, with people. Once I completed the book, I took a hold of the author's point, in which he attempted to instill in my arguments. But they did not seem to sink in, and stay.
    Although, one part I really enjoyed was chapter 29, Murdered Yes; Murderer No. It regards high redefinition, which is when someone narrows the meaning of a term so much that it will no longer apply to them. "a way of making credible denial possible." I found this interesting because this is common amongst teenagers, and even though I may have pulled this myself one day. I have seen it in the past couple weeks once I read this chapter. A few of my friends, "its not speeding, I'm late, and I'l be screwed." Skewering the fact that speeding is against the law, but its justified, because he does not mean to, hes just late. (chapter 29, 89)
    The information I have attained from reading this book has been processed through my head, and even though most of it passed as it was read, some stuck. In my arguments now I generally tend to view the other side as well as mine, to help see what the other may say. Even in arguments you have to realize not only what they are stating, but why they are supporting their choice, and how it was decided.

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  • Posted March 18, 2011

    Highly Recommend

    This is a good book to go through and really get an idea what philosophy is all about. Its purpose is to take bad arguments that people in the media, and just in general, use every day and why they are not valid arguments. The book is fairly easy to get through and understand, as the chapters are only a couple pages long, and get straight to the point. I like the way that it takes actual quotes from people in politics and in the media and dissects them. It shows you direct proof of when people use these arguments. I found the argument about false dichotomies to be very valuable because it opened my mind up to think about all of the options that are really out there for you and that just because one person says that there is only certain options for you to choose, that there are always more for you to pick from.

    After reading this book it has really helped me to see all of the bad arguments that we encounter all of the time, and therefore has made me a better listener to what people are really saying. Many people will say something that they believe is true and you do not take the time to think about it the moment they say it, and then you just believe it to be true also.

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  • Posted March 16, 2011

    Philosophy Review

    This book is full of great information about a simple point, bad arguments. The book offers quotes and valid points about popular arguments that are debated most often. You should most definitely read this book if you are looking for a good challenge, because for most non-philosophical readers it gets complicated. The author points out many fallacies and gives examples on how they are used in the world today. If you give this book time and a good amount of thinking, it will be a good interesting read, if your not willing to give this book time and thought, don't bother skimming through it and thinking you will automatically understanding all the information. Overall it's a great book to learn about bad arguments present in the world today.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2010

    meh ... it's ok

    Some interesting perspectives, but I bet the author is an ass in-person based on the way the book is written.

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  • Posted August 4, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Entertaining way to learn logical fallacies

    Baggini pulls real-world examples of faulty thinking to demonstrate logical fallacies and subtle errors made by politicians, reporters and rock stars. With 100 examples, many humorous, you are sure to find some of the ones that you are guilty of...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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