The Duff: Designated Ugly Fat Friend

( 333 )

Overview

Seventeen-year-old Bianca Piper is cynical and loyal, and she doesn't think she's the prettiest of her friends by a long shot. She's also way too smart to fall for the charms of man-slut and slimy school hottie Wesley Rush. In fact, Bianca hates him. And when he nicknames her "the Duff," she throws her Coke in his face.

But things aren't so great at home right now, and Bianca is desperate for a distraction. She ends up kissing Wesley. Worse, she likes it. Eager for escape, ...

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Overview

Seventeen-year-old Bianca Piper is cynical and loyal, and she doesn't think she's the prettiest of her friends by a long shot. She's also way too smart to fall for the charms of man-slut and slimy school hottie Wesley Rush. In fact, Bianca hates him. And when he nicknames her "the Duff," she throws her Coke in his face.

But things aren't so great at home right now, and Bianca is desperate for a distraction. She ends up kissing Wesley. Worse, she likes it. Eager for escape, Bianca throws herself into a closeted enemies-with-benefits relationship with him.

Until it all goes horribly awry. It turns out Wesley isn't such a bad listener, and his life is pretty screwed up, too. Suddenly Bianca realizes with absolute horror that she's falling for the guy she thought she hated more than anyone. And eventually, through this realization, Bianca begins to see how harmful her unhealthy way of dealing with her problems has been, and finds a way to confront them head on.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
When school "man-whore" Wesley informs Bianca that, compared to her group of beautiful friends, she is the Duff--Designated Ugly Fat Friend--17-year-old Bianca is horrified, outraged, and can't stop thinking about the label ("I couldn't believe he was making me worry about such stupid, pointless, shallow bullshit"). Which makes it all the more upsetting when she starts hooking up regularly with Wesley (even though he continues to call her "Duffy"), as a distraction from her father's struggles with alcohol and the divorce her mother is seeking. Keplinger's premise will easily hook readers as she offers the kind of conventional romance (albeit one that is heavy on hookup sex) that summer teen flicks are made of in this well-written, irreverent, and heartfelt debut. Bianca's friends care about her deeply, so there is little drama between them; the arc of this story is more about Bianca coming to grips with her feelings for Wesley, who is actually a good guy, than about restoring her self-image. Bianca is consistently strong, witty, and confident, and while the nickname pinches, it does little to hurt her self-esteem. Ages 15–up. (Sept.)
Romantic Times
"Kudos to the 18-year-old Keplinger for writing a heroine whose complicated relationship with sex is honest and heartbreaking. Expect to be recommending THE DUFF to friends for years to come."
New York Times bestselling author of Perfect Chemi Simone Elkeles
"Edgy and compelling. I couldn't put it down!"
From the Publisher
"Edgy and compelling. I couldn't put it down!"—Simone Elkeles, New York Times bestselling author of Perfect Chemistry

"[A] well-written, irreverent, and heartfelt debut."—Publishers Weekly

"A complex, enemies-with-benefits relationship that the YA market has never seen before... Keplinger scores a first for a genre in which vampires and dystopian futures rule. Her snarky teen speak, true-to-life characterizations and rollicking sense of humor never cease in her debut."—Kirkus Reviews

"Kudos to the 18-year-old Keplinger for writing a heroine whose complicated relationship with sex is honest and heartbreaking. Expect to be recommending THE DUFF to friends for years to come."—Romantic Times

Children's Literature - Anita Barnes Lowen
When "the most disgusting womanizing playboy to ever darken the doorstep of Hamilton High" sits down next to Bianca at The Nest, he says he has to be honest with her. Sure, she is smarter and more stubborn than most girls he talks to, but he needs her help. Bianca, says Wesley Rush, is the Duff, the designated ugly fat friend who can introduce him to her hot friends...especially the one with the nice rack. Bianca's swift reaction? She flings her cherry Coke in Wesley's face. When the two are assigned to write an English paper together, things suddenly take a very different turn. With Bianca's home life falling apart (her parents are divorcing and her dad, an alcoholic who has been sober for years, is boozing it up), Bianca finds an escape with Wesley. Kissing him and doing much much more distracts Bianca from her problems. Though she still hates Wesley, she needs him. And as it turns out, Wesley (whose family life is far from perfect) needs her too. Bianca is anything but a giggly girly teen. She is smart, tough, mouthy, and aggressive, but (like every girl at one time or another) vulnerable enough to be hurt by Wesley's name calling. Written by an eighteen-year-old author, this book is a quick and entertaining read. Contains obscenities and portrays sexually active teenagers. Reviewer: Anita Barnes Lowen
VOYA - Suzanne Osman
Seventeen-year-old Bianca Piper learns that she is a DUFF—a designated ugly fat friend—when her cocky classmate, Wesley Rush, explains, "every group of friends has a weak link, a Duff. And girls respond well to guys who associate with their Duffs. . . . And you, darling, are the Duff." He originally initiates a friendship with her in order to attract the attention of her two sexy girlfriends, but through their ongoing witty love—hate banter, a true relationship begins to evolve, forcing each of them to abandon their preconceptions of one another and discover real intimacy. Unfortunately, the writing feels more like spontaneous notes passed between friends during class than a rich, satisfying novel. While Keplinger offers an inspiring premise (who doesn't love reading about the underdog—or is it the underduff—who wins the heart of the elusive, gorgeous male protagonist?), she fails to provide much innovation, depth, or insight. In addition, expletives dominate the dialogue; the characters lack poetry and consistent authenticity; and rather than organically uncovering the literary lessons with finesse, Keplinger matter-of-factly blurts out how the characters have grown and changed like a twinkling neon billboard. For teens who feast on coming-of-age novels drenched in romance, sexual exploration, slumber party antics, and high school adventure, librarians would do better to purchase books by popular, masterful young adult authors such as Rachel Cohn, Sarah Dessen, and Carolyn Mackler. Reviewer: Suzanne Osman
School Library Journal
Gr 10 Up—Bianca Piper, 17, is smart, outspoken, and loyal to her two beautiful friends. She is also convinced that she is unattractive, an opinion confirmed when school hottie and "man-whore" Wesley Rush calls her a "Duff" (designated ugly fat friend). Bianca responds by throwing her Cherry Coke in his face, but when her mother decides to divorce her father, who then lapses into drinking again, she becomes involved in a secretive sexual relationship with Wesley to take her mind off her problems. Bianca finds that as their love/hate relationship continues, she is falling in love with him. Not surprisingly, Wesley, who has family problems of his own, reciprocates and announces that, although he doesn't chase girls, he is chasing her. Eventually, everything comes to a satisfying but predictable conclusion. This debut novel is a fun read and surprisingly feminist in a number of ways. Keplinger makes good points about female body image and female friendship, and discusses how both men and women use offensive terms about women as a means of social control. Bianca and the other female characters are more believable and realistic than Wesley, who is straight out of female romantic fantasyland. It is a little difficult to understand why Bianca would get involved with him after he insults her, but in their romantic scenes, there is some seriously hot chemistry. These teens are realistically and openly sexual, and there are frequent discussions of such matters as birth control and STDs, as well as a few F-bombs. Older girls, including reluctant readers, will love this one.—Kathleen E. Gruver, Burlington County Library, Westampton, NJ
Kirkus Reviews

Downing Cherry Cokes and watching her two best friends hoof it out on the dance floor of the local teen club doesn't make 17-year-old Bianca Piper feel good about herself. Especially when high-school man-slut Wesley Rush tells her she's the Duff, her friends' "designated ugly fat friend," and tries to cozy up to her in order to get into her friends' pants. Later on, somehow, someway, Bianca finds herself drawn to Wesley, and before she knows it, they've created a complex, enemies-with-benefits relationship that the YA market has never seen before. Their encounters are heatedly frank and full of humor, anger and rage, and soon the two learn they have more in common than they could ever have expected. Keplinger scores a first for a genre in which vampires and dystopian futures rule. Her snarky teen speak, true-to-life characterizations and rollicking sense of humor never cease in her debut. Teen readers will see both themselves and their friends in Bianca's layered, hostile world. (Fiction. 12 & up)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316084246
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 6/7/2011
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 89,994
  • Age range: 15 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Kody Keplinger

Kody Keplinger was only 17 when she wrote her debut novel, THE DUFF (Designated Ugly Fat Friend), which was an ALA 2011 Quick Picks selection. She grew up in a small town in Kentucky, where she began her writing career. When she isn't writing, she enjoys going to the theater, hanging out in bookstores, and eating Thai food. Kody currently lives in New York City, where she can do all of those things regularly. You can find out more about Kody and her books on her website: www.kodykeplinger.com.

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Read an Excerpt

The DUFF

(Designated Ugly Fat Friend)
By Keplinger, Kody

Poppy

Copyright © 2010 Keplinger, Kody
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780316084239

1

This was getting old.

Once again, Casey and Jessica were making complete fools of themselves, shaking their asses like dancers in a rap video. But I guess guys eat that shit up, don’t they? I could honestly feel my IQ dropping as I wondered, for the hundredth time that night, why I’d let them drag me here again.

Every time we came to the Nest, the same thing happened. Casey and Jessica danced, flirted, attracted the attention of every male in sight, and eventually were hauled out of the party by their protective best friend—me—before any of the horn dogs could take advantage of them. In the meantime, I sat at the bar all night talking to Joe, the thirty-year-old bartender, about “the problems with kids these days.”

I figured Joe would get offended if I told him that one of the biggest problems was this damn place. The Nest, which used to be a real bar, had been converted into a teen lounge three years ago. The rickety oak bar still stood, but Joe served only Coke products while the kids danced or listened to live music. I hated the place for the simple reason that it made my friends, who could be somewhat sensible most of the time, act like idiots. But in their defense, they weren’t the only ones. Half of Hamilton High showed up on the weekends, and no one left the club with their dignity intact.

I mean seriously, where was the fun in all of this? Want to dance to the same heavy bass techno music week after week? Sure! Then maybe I’ll hit on this sweaty, oversexed football player. Maybe we’ll have meaningful discussions about politics and philosophy while we bump ’n grind. Ugh. Yeah, right.

Casey plopped down on the stool next to mine. “You should come dance with us, B,” she said, breathless from her booty shaking. “It’s so much fun.”

“Sure it is,” I muttered.

“Oh my gosh!” Jessica sat down on my other side, her honey-blond ponytail bouncing against her shoulders. “Did you see that? Did you effing see that? Harrison Carlyle totally just hit on me! Did you see that? Omigosh!”

Casey rolled her eyes. “He asked you where you got your shoes, Jess. He’s totally gay.”

“He’s too cute to be gay.”

Casey ignored her, running her fingers behind her ear, as if tucking back invisible locks. It was a habit left over from before she’d chopped her hair into its current edgy blond pixie cut. “B, you should dance with us. We brought you here so that we could hang out with you—not that Joe isn’t entertaining.” She winked at the bartender, probably hoping to score some free sodas. “But we’re your friends. You should come dance. Shouldn’t she, Jess?”

“Totally,” Jessica agreed, eyeing Harrison Carlyle, who sat in a booth on the other side of the room. She paused and turned back to us. “Wait. What? I wasn’t listening.”

“You just look so bored over here, B. I want you to have some fun, too.”

“I’m fine,” I lied. “I’m having a great time. You know I can’t dance. I’d be in your way. Go… live it up or whatever. I’ll be okay over here.”

Casey narrowed her hazel eyes at me. “You sure?” she asked.

“Positive.”

She frowned, but after a second she shrugged and grabbed Jessica by the wrist, pulling her out onto the dance floor. “Holy crap!” Jessica cried. “Slow down, Case! You’ll rip my arm off!” Then they made their merry way to the middle of the room, already syncing the sway of their hips with the pulsing techno music.

“Why didn’t you tell them you’re miserable?” Joe asked, pushing a glass of Cherry Coke toward me.

“I’m not miserable.”

“You’re not a good liar either,” he replied before a group of freshmen started yelling for drinks at the other end of the bar.

I sipped my Cherry Coke, watching the clock above the bar. The second hand seemed to be frozen, and I prayed the damn thing was broken or something. I wouldn’t ask Casey and Jessica to leave until eleven. Any earlier and I’d be the party pooper. But according to the clock it wasn’t even nine yet, and I could already feel myself getting a techno-music migraine, only made worse by the pulsing strobe light. Move, second hand! Move!

“Hello there.”

I rolled my eyes and turned to glare at the unwelcome intruder. This happened once in a while. Some guy, usually stoned or rank with BO, would take a seat beside me and make a half-assed attempt at small talk. Clearly they hadn’t inherited the observant gene, because the expression on my face made it pretty damn obvious that I wasn’t in the mood to be swept off my feet.

Surprisingly, the guy who’d taken the seat next to me didn’t stink like pot or armpits. In fact, that might have been cologne I smelled on the air. But my disgust only increased when I realized who the cologne belonged to. I would have preferred the fuzzy-headed stoner.

Wesley. Fucking. Rush.

“What do you want?” I demanded, not even bothering to be polite.

“Aren’t you the friendly type?” Wesley asked sarcastically. “Actually, I came to talk to you.”

“Well, that sucks for you. I’m not talking to people tonight.” I slurped my drink loudly, hoping he’d take the not-so-subtle hint to leave. No such luck. I could feel his dark gray eyes crawling all over me. He couldn’t even pretend to be looking me in the eyes, could he? Ugh!

“Come on,” Wesley teased. “There’s no need to be so cold.”

“Leave me alone,” I hissed through clenched teeth. “Go try your charming act on some tramp with low self-esteem, because I’m not falling for it.”

“Oh, I’m not interested in tramps,” he said. “That’s not my thing.”

I snorted. “Any girl who’d give you the time of day, Wesley, is most definitely a tramp. No one with taste or class or dignity would actually find you attractive.”

Okay. That was a tiny lie.

Wesley Rush was the most disgusting womanizing playboy to ever darken the doorstep of Hamilton High… but he was kind of hot. Maybe if you could put him on mute… and cut off his hands… maybe—just maybe—he’d be tolerable then. Otherwise, he was a real piece of shit. Horn dog shit.

“And you do have taste and class and dignity, I assume?” he asked, grinning.

“Yes, I do.”

“That’s a shame.”

“Is this your attempt at flirting?” I asked. “If it is, you fail. Epically.”

He laughed. “I never fail at flirting.” He ran his fingers through his dark, curly hair and adjusted his crooked, arrogant little grin. “I’m just being friendly. Trying to have a nice conversation.”

“Sorry. Not interested.” I turned away and took another drink of my Cherry Coke. But he didn’t move. Not even an inch. “You can go now,” I said forcefully.

Wesley sighed. “Fine. You’re being really uncooperative, you know. So I guess I’ll be honest with you. I’ve got to hand it to you: you’re smarter and more stubborn than most girls I talk to. But I’m here for a little more than witty conversation.” He moved his attention to the dance floor. “I actually need your help. You see, your friends are hot. And you, darling, are the Duff.”

“Is that even a word?”

“Designated. Ugly. Fat. Friend,” he clarified. “No offense, but that would be you.”

“I am not the—!”

“Hey, don’t get defensive. It’s not like you’re an ogre or anything, but in comparison…” He shrugged his broad shoulders. “Think about it. Why do they bring you here if you don’t dance?” He had the nerve to reach over and pat my knee, like he was trying to comfort me. I jerked away from him, and his fingers moved smoothly to brush some curls out of his face instead. “Look,” he said, “you have hot friends… really hot friends.” He paused, watching the action on the dance floor for a moment, before facing me again. “The point is, scientists have proven that every group of friends has a weak link, a Duff. And girls respond well to guys who associate with their Duffs.”

“Crackheads can call themselves scientists now? That’s news to me.”

“Don’t be bitter,” he said. “What I’m saying is, girls—like your friends—find it sexy when guys show some sensitivity and socialize with the Duff. So by talking to you right now I am doubling my chances of getting laid tonight. Please assist me here, and just pretend to enjoy the conversation.”

I stared at him, flabbergasted, for a long moment. Beauty really was skin-deep. Wesley Rush may have had the body of a Greek god, but his soul was as black and empty as the inside of my closet. What a bastard!

With one swift motion I jumped to my feet and flung the contents of my glass in Wesley’s direction. Cherry Coke flew all over him, splattering his expensive-looking white polo. Drops of dark red liquid glistened on his cheeks and colored his brown hair. His face glowed with anger, and his chiseled jaw clinched fiercely.

“What was that for?” he snapped, wiping his face with the back of his hand.

“What do you think it was for?” I bellowed, fists balled at my sides.

“Honestly, Duffy, I have no earthly idea.”

Angry flames blazed in my cheeks. “If you think I’m letting one of my friends leave this place with you, Wesley, you’re very, very wrong,” I spat. “You’re a disgusting, shallow, womanizing jackass, and I hope that soda stains your preppy little shirt.” Just before I marched away, I looked over my shoulder and added, “And my name isn’t Duffy. It’s Bianca. We’ve been in the same homeroom since middle school, you self-absorbed son of a bitch.”

I never thought I’d say this, but thank God the damn techno played so loud. No one but Joe overheard the little episode, and he probably found the whole thing hysterical. I had to push my way through the crowded dance floor to find my friends. When I tracked them down, I grabbed Casey and Jessica by their elbows and tugged them toward the exit.

“Hey!” Jessica protested.

“What’s wrong?” Casey asked.

“We’re getting the fuck out of here,” I said, yanking their unwilling bodies along behind me. “I’ll explain in the car. I just can’t stand to be in this hellhole for one more second.”

“Can’t I say bye to Harrison first?” Jessica whined, trying to loosen my grip on her arm.

“Jessica!” I cricked my neck painfully when I twisted around to face her. “He’s gay! You don’t have a chance, so just give it up already. I need to get out of here. Please.”

I pulled them out into the parking lot, where the icy January air tore at the bare flesh of our faces. Relenting, Casey and Jessica gathered close on either side of me. They must have found their outfits, which were intended to be sexy, ill equipped to handle the windchill. We moved to my car in a huddle, separating only when we reached the front bumper. I clicked the unlock button on my key chain so that we could climb into the slightly warmer cab of the Saturn without delay.

Casey curled up in the front seat and said, through chattering teeth, “Why are we leaving so early? B, it’s only, like, nine-fifteen.”

Jessica sulked in the backseat with an ancient blanket wrapped around her like a cocoon. (My piece-of-shit heater rarely decided to work, so I kept a stash of blankets on the floorboard.)

“I got into an argument with someone,” I explained, jabbing the key into the ignition with unnecessary force. “I threw my Coke on him, and I didn’t want to stick around for his response.”

“Who?” Casey asked.

I’d been dreading that question because I knew the reaction I’d get. “Wesley Rush.”

Two swoony, girly sighs followed my answer.

“Oh, come on,” I fumed. “The guy is a man-whore. I can’t stand him. He sleeps with everything that moves, and his brain is located in his pants—which means it’s microscopic.”

“I doubt that,” Casey said with another sigh. “God, B, only you could find a flaw in Wesley Rush.”

I glared at her as I turned my head to back out of the parking lot. “He’s a jerk.”

“That’s not true,” Jessica interjected. “Jeanine said he talked to her at a party recently. She was with Vikki and Angela, and she said he just came up and sat down beside her. He was really friendly.”

That made sense. Jeanine was definitely the Duff if she was out with Angela and Vikki. I wondered which of them left with Wesley that night.

“He’s charming,” Casey said. “You’re just being Little Miss Cynical, as usual.” She gave me a warm smile from across the cab. “But what the hell did he do to get you to throw Coke at him?” Now she sounded concerned. Took her long enough. “Did he say something to you, B?”

“No,” I lied. “It’s nothing. He just pisses me off.”

Duff.

The word bounced around in my mind as I sped down 5th Street. I couldn’t bring myself to tell my friends about the wonderful new insult that had just been added to my vocab list, but when I glanced at myself in the rearview mirror, Wesley’s assertion that I was the unattractive, undesirable tagalong (more like dragalong) seemed to be confirmed. Jessica’s perfect hourglass figure and warm, welcoming brown eyes. Casey’s flawless complexion and mile-long legs. I couldn’t compare to either of them.

“Well, I say we hit another party, since it’s so early,” Casey suggested. “I heard about this one out in Oak Hill. Some college kid is home for Christmas break and decided to have a big blowout. Angela told me about it this morning. Want to go?”

“Yeah!” Jessica straightened up beneath the blanket. “We should totally go! College parties have college boys. Won’t that be fun, Bianca?”

I sighed. “No. Not really.”

“Oh, come on.” Casey reached over and squeezed my arm. “No dancing this time, okay? And Jess and I promise to keep all hot guys away from you, since clearly you hate them.” She smirked, trying to nudge me back into a good mood.

“I don’t hate hot guys,” I told her. “Just the one.” After a moment, I sighed and turned onto the highway, heading for the county line. “Fine, we’ll go. But you two are buying me ice cream afterward. Two scoops.”

“Deal.”



Continues...

Excerpted from The DUFF by Keplinger, Kody Copyright © 2010 by Keplinger, Kody. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 333 )
Rating Distribution

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(241)

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(60)

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(20)

2 Star

(5)

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(7)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 337 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2012

    I loved this book. Definitely a favorite

    10 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 23, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Fresh new story, snarky-smart characters, minor caveats

    Bianca Piper's two best friends are gorgeous, but that's never bothered her. She's brilliant, cynical, and wiser than her buddies and they all support and care for each other, so the prettiness contrast isn't an issue until resident ladies' man Wesley Rush tells her to her face that's she's their DUFF: Designated Ugly Fat Friend. Wesley also has the nerve to tell Bianca that by showing sensitivity and deigning to talk with her, he's upping his chances of seeing some action with her friends. Needless to say, Bianca shuts him down, and rightly so, but as her home situation gets sadder and more complicated she finds herself drowning her sorrow with none other than Wesley "Womanizer" Rush.

    I was delighted by the portrayal of Bianca's relationship with her friends. At first, I was of the opinion that Bianca was basically doing them a favor by hanging out with them, since she's intelligent and practical, but in short order I saw that Casey and Jessica weren't at all ditzy. They balance Bianca's snarky view on life, and together they achieve a balanced group dynamic that's very believable and fun to read. I could see myself reading a book with either Casey or Jessica as the protagonist; that's how fleshed-out the characters were.

    I wish Wesley had gotten more development. At first, Wesley came off as a wonderfully calculating and shrewd jerk, and I was ready to see him humbled and looking forward to plenty of battles of wits between him and Bianca. Unfortunately, the terrific tension and verbal sparring in the early chapters seems to wane with time. Wesley seems most like a 3-dimensional character in the first thirty or so pages, then when he and Bianca fall into an enemies-with-benefits arrangement, he loses some vitality. Yes, plenty of attempts are made to give him a more rounded character--his love for his little sister, standing up for Bianca, showing some intellect regarding an essay assignment--but the initial spark was gone. Maybe I just want my YA couples to move more slowly?

    One other thing I had trouble with was the way Bianca kept using Wesley. She loathes him partly because he's an egomaniac, but mainly because he's wildly promiscuous. The trouble is, she thinks that his low moral standards make it perfectly okay for her to use him whenever she happens to need a distraction. Now don't get me wrong, he's totally happy and content with being treated this way, but I couldn't help but be disappointed that Bianca followed the "he's a total skank, so I can treat him any way I want, and it's fine" philosophy.

    On the upside, The DUFF explores lots of important ideas about self-respect and self-worth. I love the assertion that basically everyone has felt like the duff of their group before--every girl (and guy) feels like they're lacking at one time or another. It's very empowering and encouraging.

    Bianca's narrative voice is funny, sharp, and smart, and with the exception of the difficulties with Wesley, I really enjoyed the book. I'll definitely be looking forward to future writings from Kody Keplinger.

    10 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2012

    Veena Loves This Book ! This Book Is On Point !

    This book is great ! I COULDNT PUT IT DOWN! i wish it was kinda longer ! But GOOD read ! I couldnt stop reading !

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2012

    Amazing read

    Loved it! I couldnt put it down!!!

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2012

    I LOVED this book!!! i couldnt put it down. This book gave great

    I LOVED this book!!! i couldnt put it down. This book gave great insight on what others girls ( not skinny or blessed with great looks) feel and how many are treated. The author developed good characterization to all her charcters! The book really showed the power of freindship. Very relatable. A must read!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2012

    Amazing!

    I love to read and finished this book in a day! I loved how everything turned out and its a relatable book by far!!! I did kinda wish it was longer but for it being relatively short it was very sexy and intense, fantastic ive also read shut out by Kody it was great also and she is an amazing author!!!(:

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 25, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    bookittyblog

    The Duff was a fast read but not my cup of tea. I wouldn't recommend this book to young adults because to me it just doesn't give any positive advise to teens. It doesn't make sense that Bianca had sex with Wesley just to escape form her problems at home. The guy wasn't even nice to her, at one point he called her fat and ugly. I wished she had loved her self more and had a bit more self worth. I know this is just a book but there's teens out there that would think that sleeping with a guy will fix their problems.

    I recommend this book to ADULTS that like fast paced books.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 26, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Possibly this generation's Forever...

    I started this book ready to be disappointed. There's been so much hype, and not all of it good, that I didn't think The Duff could possibly live up to it. Then I opened it and found a pessimistic, foul-mouthed main character that I didn't think I'd grow to care about. I brought an extra book with me to read on my commute so that i could put this one down as soon as I'd read the obligatory 50 pages (this is my personal rule for books sent to me for review). Next thing I know, I'd almost missed my train stop because I was so sucked in.


    Bianca's relationship with Wesley is clearly complicated, though she tries to play it off as the simplest thing ever: just sex. Wesley seems okay with this arrangement and helps Bianca keep up appearances at school and everywhere else for a while. They hate each other. He's a man-slut, womanizing, cocky little brat, representing everything that Bianca, a smart and confident young woman, despises. And he calls her "Duffy," constantly reminding her that he's way out of her league and that their relationship could never go public. For the most part, they maintain a snarky banter both in and out of the bedroom (it's very 10 Things I Hate About You). Until they don't. Bianca is having some very real problems at home that she's avoiding by spending all of her time with Wesley. She can ignore things when she's with him; her friends will want to help and make her talk about it. Wesley just asks her if she's okay and then listens; he doesn't push. Maybe this is because he doesn't actually care (likely in Bianca's opinion) or maybe, as she comes to figure out, it's because he has real problems that he doesn't want to talk about either.

    Other reviewers have said that the relationships between Bianca and her friends is what "saved" this book for them. Their friendship is sweet, fierce and awesome. They build each other up with nary an insult. Bianca ditches her friends for Wesley and doesn't even tell them about him. I think this happens a lot (it certainly did when I was in college), and to see it portrayed here was great. Bianca's friends are both pissed and worried, and both those sentiments are clearly expressed. No one is one-dimensional. When Bianca finally spills all to her friends, they (mostly) forgive her. Casey decides to make the word duff theirs. Instead of having a fat day or a bad hair day or even a zit, they say it's their turn to be the Duff. Though the word catches Bianca off guard throughout the book, it loses it's power to make her feel ugly and fat, exactly what the word is supposed to imply.

    Overall, I enjoyed this book. It's all about relationships, between Bianca and her friends, Bianca and her parents, Bianca and Wesley, but it's not weighed down by emotional drama. Sure, there are really emotionally draining parts of this book, especially when it comes to Bianca and her parents, but they are tempered by sarcasm, sex, and Bianca's own personality.


    Book source: ARC provided by the publisher.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2011

    Simply Amazing

    The Duff is one of the best books i have have read in a long time. It kept me at the edge of my seat, and I couldn't put it down until I was finished. The characters developed very lovely. The Duff is a book I will want to keep re-reading. I suggest a lot of people should read this book, because it is so much fun to read.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2011

    Love it

    Best book iever read

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2013

    Love love love

    I absolutely loved this book! Finished it one day! I fell in love with Biancas witty attitude. And Wesley was a jerk at first that you will grow to love!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

    Thank you!

    Honestly, ive been bullied forever. This book made me embrace not being the prettiest girl in my friend group and im not even close... Sometimes you just have to accept who you are and genuinenly deal with it. I loved this book sooo much and im looking for a sequel!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2012

    The DUFF.

    I've read this book like three time already. Every time i want to read something but cant decide on anything new This is my choise. This book is kind of a love story and it talks about the insecurities and problems that Bianca faces. When she is faced by family problems and the boy who broke her heart on freshmen year comes back to town for a little while, she tries to escape through Weasly, the rich kid who is in ither words a man-whore. In this book feeling that werent supposed to be there surface and things take a turn from nothing other than a meaningless fling to having feelings for each other. This book is great. And i recomend it to everyone. :)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2012

    Best book ever!

    DUFF: designated ugly fat friend. When i furts started reading this book and i first herd the word duff and what it means it made me curious if i could be a duff. Not to toot my own horn or anything but im popular and very pretty but im not shallow or anything i talk to every 1 and try to make people feel welcome.
    My 2 best friends mia and jessica are very prettt jessica looks like super model and has long legs and towers over every 1 by at least 4inch my friend mia has brite blue eyes and brown hair both of them are great but it really made me think.......
    As u can c i can relate to duff on many different levels and would recomend this book for ages 13 and up. This book made me laugh smile and cry all at once luv luv luved this book must read

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2012

    Sexy

    The stars say ut all

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 17, 2011

    Loved it!!!!!!!!!!!

    Duff is one of the best books i have ever read!!! I totally, completely, LOVE this book. I definantily recommend it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 29, 2011

    Love it!

    This book is awesome! I would definitely recommend it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 24, 2011

    Cass

    One of the best books i have ever read, a tear jerker.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2014

    amazing book

    Awesome book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2014

    Great

    Exactly the type of book i was looking for.

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