Dummies 101: Word 97 for Windows (with CD-ROM)

Overview

With 20 million registered users, Microsoft Word has never been more popular. Now the world's leading word-processing application is out in a brand new version, and it's chock-full of features to help you work more productively and creatively. With Dummies 101: Word 97 For Windows, you learn step by step how to create, open, save, and print documents as well as how to format documents for that polished, professional look. Plus, thanks to the bonus CD-ROM included with Dummies 101: Word 97 For Windows, you get to ...
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Overview

With 20 million registered users, Microsoft Word has never been more popular. Now the world's leading word-processing application is out in a brand new version, and it's chock-full of features to help you work more productively and creatively. With Dummies 101: Word 97 For Windows, you learn step by step how to create, open, save, and print documents as well as how to format documents for that polished, professional look. Plus, thanks to the bonus CD-ROM included with Dummies 101: Word 97 For Windows, you get to learn hands-on with sample documents keyed to the book's exercises.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764500947
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/1/1997
  • Series: Dummies 101 Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 228
  • Product dimensions: 8.44 (w) x 9.95 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction
Whom This Book Is For
What's in This Book, Anyway?
Part I: Getting Acquainted with Word 97 For Windows
Part II: Deciding on the Look of Documents
Part III: Printing Documents, Envelopes, and Labels
Part IV: Streamlining Your Work
Part V: Appendixes
Foolish Assumptions about the Reader
About the CD
The Cast of Icons
Conventions of This Book

Part I: Getting Acquainted with Word 97 for Windows

Unit 1: The Fundamentals
Lesson 1-1: Starting Word 97
Lesson 1-2: Creating Your First Document
Lesson 1-3: Saving and Naming a Document
Lesson 1-4: Closing a Document
Lesson 1-5: Opening an Existing Document
Lesson 1-6: Finding Your Way Around the Screen
Lesson 1-7: Exiting Word 97
Unit 1 Quiz
Unit 1 Exercise
Unit 2: Telling Word What You Want It to Do
Lesson 2-1: Giving Commands by Clicking Buttons
Lesson 2-2: Giving Commands with Shortcut Keys
Lesson 2-3: Choosing Menu Commands
Lesson 2-4: Taking Advantage of Shortcut Menus
Lesson 2-5: Filling In Dialog Boxes
Unit 2 Quiz
Unit 2 Exercise
Unit 3: Entering and Editing Text
Lesson 3-1: Selecting Text
Lesson 3-2: Moving Text to New Places On-Screen
Lesson 3-3: Copying and Pasting Text
Lesson 3-4: Deleting Text
Lesson 3-5: Changing the Case of Characters
Lesson 3-6: Entering Symbols and Special Characters
Unit 3 Quiz
Unit 3 Exercise
Unit 4: Moving Around in Documents
Lesson 4-1: Using the Scroll Bars to Move Around
Lesson 4-2: Using the Keyboard to Move Around
Lesson 4-3: Browsing Around in a Document
Unit 4 Quiz
Unit 4 Exercise
Unit 5: Getting Help When You Need It
Lesson 5-1: Getting Help by Category
Lesson 5-2: Using the Help Index
Lesson 5-3: Asking the Office Assistant for Help
Lesson 5-4: Using the Help Buttons
Unit 5 Quiz
Unit 5 Exercise
Part I Review
Unit 1 Summary
Unit 2 Summary
Unit 3 Summary
Unit 4 Summary
Unit 5 Summary
Part I Test
Part I Lab Assignment
Step 1: Opening the letter document
Step 2: Copying text and moving around
Step 3: Saving a document
Step 4: Selecting, copying, and moving text
Step 5: Saving and closing

Part II: Deciding on the Look of Documents

Unit 6: Applying Character Styles to Text
Lesson 6-1: Boldfacing Headings in Documents
Lesson 6-2: Italicizing Words
Lesson 6-3: Underlining Words
Lesson 6-4: Superscript, Subscript, and Strikethrough
Unit 6 Quiz
Unit 6 Exercise
Unit 7: Changing the Appearance of Text
Lesson 7-1: Choosing a Type Size
Lesson 7-2: Choosing a Font for Text
Lesson 7-3: Choosing a Color for Text
Lesson 7-4: Highlighting Text
Unit 7 Quiz
Unit 7 Exercise
Unit 8: Ways of Aligning Text
Lesson 8-1: Centering and Justifying Text
Lesson 8-2: Left- and Right-Aligning Text
Lesson 8-3: Aligning Text with Tabs
Lesson 8-4: Indenting Paragraphs and First Lines
Unit 8 Quiz
Unit 8 Exercise
Unit 9: Laying Out the Page
Lesson 9-1: Handling Line Spacing
Lesson 9-2: Setting Up and Changing the Margins
Lesson 9-3: Starting a New Page
Lesson 9-4: Creating a "Landscape" Document
Unit 9 Quiz
Unit 9 Exercise
Part II Review
Unit 6 Summary
Unit 7 Summary
Unit 8 Summary
Unit 9 Summary
Part II Test
Part II Lab Assignment
Step 1: Changing the font and font size
Step 2: Changing character styles
Step 3: Centering and aligning
Step 4: Indenting paragraphs
Step 5: Line spacing

Part III: Printing Documents and Envelopes

Unit 10: Getting Ready to Print
Lesson 10-1: Telling Word 97 How You Want to Print
Lesson 10-2: Getting a Sneak Preview of a Document
Unit 10 Quiz
Unit 10 Exercise
Unit 11: Printing in Word 97
Lesson 11-1: Printing an Entire Document
Lesson 11-2: Printing a Part of a Document
Lesson 11-3: Printing More Than One Copy
Lesson 11-4: Printing Addresses on Envelopes
Unit 11 Quiz
Unit 11 Exercise
Part III Review
Unit 10 Summary
Unit 11 Summary
Part III Test
Part III Lab Assignment
Step 1: Previewing the entire document
Step 2: Looking for and fixing errors
Step 3: Printing part of a document
Step 4: Printing an entire document

Part IV: Streamlining Your Work

Unit 12: Deciding How the Screen Should Look
Lesson 12-1: Removing and Adding Toolbars
Lesson 12-2: Removing the Ruler
Lesson 12-3: Working in Full Screen View
Lesson 12-4: Working in Page Layout View
Unit 12 Quiz
Unit 12 Exercise
Unit 13: Different Ways of Working on Documents
Lesson 13-1: Working with More Than One Document
Lesson 13-2: Working in Two Places in the Same Document
Lesson 13-3: Zooming In and Zooming Out
Lesson 13-4: Inserting One Document into Another
Unit 13 Quiz
Unit 13 Exercise
Unit 14: Writing Aids
Lesson 14-1: Fixing Spelling and Grammatical Errors
Lesson 14-2: Choosing Words with the Thesaurus
Lesson 14-3: Finding and Replacing Words and Phrases
Lesson 14-4: Using the Undo and Redo Commands
Lesson 14-5: Entering "Automatic" Text
Unit 14 Quiz
Unit 14 Exercise
Unit 15: Some Neat Formatting Tricks
Lesson 15-1: Creating a Numbered List
Lesson 15-2: Creating a Bulleted List
Lesson 15-3: Numbering the Pages in a Document
Lesson 15-4: Creating Headers and Footers
Unit 15 Quiz
Unit 15 Exercise
Part IV Review
Unit 12 Summary
Unit 13 Summary
Unit 14 Summary
Unit 15 Summary
Part IV Test
Part IV Lab Assignment
Step 1: Manipulating the screen
Step 2: Working with windows and other files
Step 3: Clarity and writing
Step 4: Formatting lists and pages

Part V: Appendixes

Appendix A: Answers
Part I Test Answers
Part II Test Answers
Part III Test Answers
Part IV Test Answers
Appendix B: About the CD
System Requirements
Installing the CD
Installing the icons
Installing the exercise files
Accessing the exercise files
Accessing the extra credit unit on the CD
Removing the exercise files
If You've Got Problems (Of the CD Kind)

Index

License Agreement

Installing the CD

Reader Response Card

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First Chapter

Unit 13
Different Ways of Working on Documents

Objectives for This Unit

  • Working on more than one document at once
  • Splitting the screen to work in two places in the same document
  • Opening a second window for a document
  • Moving from place to place by using bookmarks
  • Using the Zoom Control menu to change how a document looks on-screen
  • Inserting one document into another

In the last unit, you learned how to make the Word 97 document window work for you. This unit goes a step further and explains the commands on the Window menu. These commands can come in very, very handy. For example, you can work in more than one place at once in a document by splitting the screen or by getting two different windows on the same document. You can also "zoom in on" text to enlarge the letters on-screen and do your eyes a big favor. Finally, this unit demonstrates a very neat technique for recycling old documents and putting them to work in the documents you're writing now.

Lesson 13-1: Working with More Than One Document

In Word 97, working on more than one document at the same time is fairly easy. I can think of lots of reasons for doing so. If you're working on a cover letter to send with a report, for example, you can open the report and the cover letter and copy text from the report to the letter as you compose the letter. If a passage from the cover letter would work well in the report, you can copy it from the letter to the report. These days, most people have more than one résumé. If I apply for a writing job, I use my Writer résumé. But that doesn't mean that I can't open my Editor résumé and copy material from it to my Writer résumé to boost my image and increase my chances of appearing indispensable.

To work on more than one document at once, you use commands on the Window menu. In Lessons 13-1 and 13-2, you will explore these commands. For this lesson, you will use the Article file in the Word101 folder. The Article file is the start of an article about Rosenda Monteros, the skillful and talented actress. In this exercise, you will open a second file and use it for inspiration as you write the article.

Follow these steps to practice with the commands on the Window menu:

  1. Open the Article file in the Word101 folder and scroll to the end of the file.

    If you scroll to the last line of the article, you see that it begins to offer an example. A good "for example" is never easy to come up with in writing, so you decide to get an example from another file that you've already worked on.

  2. Open the Source file in the Word101 folder and copy the blue text to the Clipboard.

    For the purposes of this exercise, I have colored the text that you need to copy from the Source file to the Article file blue. Normally, you would be the one to have to search for text to "cannibalize," of course.

  3. Click Window on the menu bar.

    Both Article and Source appear on the Window menu. All open documents appear at the bottom of the Window menu. The one that you're viewing at present has a check mark next to its name.

  4. Click Article to switch to that document.

    You can also press 1, the number beside Article on the Window menu, to switch files.

  5. With the cursor at the end of the article about Rosenda Monteros, choose Edit-->Paste to paste the text from the Source file to the Article file.

    With a little cleaning up, you have a perfectly usable description for the last paragraph in the Article file.

  6. Click the Undo button to remove the text that you just copied to the Article file.
  7. Go back to the Source file by choosing Window-->2 Source.

    In the next seven steps, you will copy the text again, but this time you will do so with both documents displayed on-screen.

  8. Choose Window-->Arrange All.

    When you choose this command, Word 97 does its best to put all open documents on-screen. In this case, there are only two open documents, so both fit nicely on-screen, as shown in Figure 13-1. Notice that each has its own scroll bar and that the Source file is the active document. You can tell because its title bar has color on it, whereas the Article file's title bar is grayed out.

    The blue text should still be highlighted in the Source file.

  9. Scroll to the blue text to make sure that it is still highlighted, and then click the Copy button to copy the text to the Clipboard.
  10. Click in the Article file's window, press Ctrl+End to move the cursor to the end of the file, and click the Paste button.

    When you click in a new window, its toolbar gets "colorized," and that window becomes the active document.

  11. Move the cursor over the border between the two windows. When it changes into a two-headed arrow, click and drag to make the Article file window bigger and the Source file window smaller.

    You can make the windows as large or as small as you like by dragging their borders this way. Suppose that you decide that you want the Article file to fill the entire screen again.

  12. Click the Maximize button (the big square) on the Article file title bar.

    You can also choose Maximize from the Control menu to make the file fill the entire screen. Now the window is maximized. What happened to the Source file window?

  13. Click the Article file's Restore button (the two squares).

    Now the two windows are back on-screen again. In the next step, you will copy text from the Source file to the Article file by dragging it.

  14. Click in the Source file where the text is still highlighted, and hold down the Ctrl key as you drag the highlighted text across the divide and into the Article file.

    You already copied the text twice with the Clipboard. As this step demonstrates, you can also copy or move text directly from open document to open document when both documents are placed side-by-side on-screen with the Window-->Arrange All command.

Working with two open documents on-screen is not necessarily easy. Neither window is large enough to get any work done, but you can play with the Maximize and Restore buttons to shrink and enlarge windows as you need them. If it's not too much to ask, you may go through the exercise in Lesson 13-1 again to get a better feel for the admittedly complex Window-->Arrange All command.

Lesson 13-2: Working in Two Places in the Same Document

I can think of lots of reasons to work in two places in the same document at once. For example, you're writing a long report and want the conclusion to fulfill all the promises that the introduction makes. You can open the document to both places to compare them and make sure that they pony up the same information. A report that promises on page 1 to prove that rodents killed the dinosaurs by eating their eggs but concludes by saying that freezing temperatures killed the dinosaurs would not convince anyone that you're a dinosaur expert.

Word 97 offers two ways to open a document to two different places. One way is to split the screen so that one part of the document appears in the top half and the other part appears in the bottom half, as in Figure 13-2. The other way is to open two different views of the same document with the Window menu. When you choose one view, you go to one place in the document, and when you choose the other you go to the other place. When you work with two views, you're still working with one document, not two. In either view, you make changes to a single document, not two documents.

For this lesson about opening two views on a document, open the Window file in the Word101 folder. First, you'll see how to split the screen. Later in this lesson, you learn how to open a second view of a document.

Splitting the screen with Window-->Split

To get some practice in splitting the screen, follow these steps:

  1. Choose Window-->Split.

    A gray line appears on-screen with the double-arrowed "split cursor" in the middle.

  2. Move the split cursor down the screen to just below the opening paragraph of the Window files and then click.

    Now a gray line runs across the screen (if your ruler is turned on, a second ruler runs across the screen, as well). You have divided the screen into north and south halves. Notice that each half of the screen has its own set of scroll bars.

  3. Click in the southern half of the screen and press Ctrl+End to move to the end of the document.

    Your screen should look something like Figure 13-2. Does the conclusion make good on the promises made by the introduction? (You have to scroll up a few lines to see the entire conclusion.) If the conclusion and introduction don't match, you can edit them while both are on-screen.

  4. Move the pointer over the gray line that divides the screen. When you see the split cursor and a small box that reads "Resize," click and drag the gray line up the screen a little way.

    You can adjust where the screen is split by clicking on the gray line and dragging it.

  5. Choose Window-->Remove Split to see only one part of the document.

    You're left with the conclusion. If you had chosen Window-->Remove Split with the cursor on the introduction side of the screen, you would have been left at the start of the document instead of at the end.

  6. Press Ctrl+Home to go to the start of the document.

    Now you will learn a second way to split the screen.

Splitting the screen by dragging the split cursor

The Window-->Split command isn't the only way to split the screen. You can also use the slot at the top of the vertical scroll bar:

  1. Move the mouse cursor to the top of the vertical scroll bar along the right side of the screen, to the small gray rectangle just above the up arrow, and gently lay the cursor there.

    If you do so correctly, you see the split cursor again. Figure 13-2 shows exactly where the "slot" is.

  2. When the split cursor appears, hold down the left mouse button and drag the cursor onto the document; then release the mouse button when the gray line is just below the introductory paragraph.

    Once again, the document is divided in half. Your screen looks like Figure 13-2.

  3. Press Ctrl+End to go to the end of the document; then click in the northern half of the screen.

    This time, you'll try another technique for "unsplitting" the screen.

  4. Move the mouse pointer to the split, feel around until you see the split cursor again, and then click and drag the split to the bottom of the screen.

    Sort of like lowering a curtain on the southern half of the screen, isn't it? Now the southern half is gone, and you're left with the introduction.

    You can also remove a split by dragging the line to the top of the screen. If you drag the line to the top, you're left with the bottom half of the split screen. If you drag the line to the bottom, you're left with the top half of the split screen.

To sum up, you can split a screen by choosing Window-->Split or by dragging the split cursor away from the small gray rectangle at the top of the vertical scroll bar. To "unsplit" a screen, either choose Window-->Remove Split or drag the divider to the top or to the bottom of the screen.

Leave the Window file open so that you can do the next exercise.

Getting a view of two different places in a document

The other way to work in two different places is to open two different windows on the same document. Follow these steps to practice this method of being in two places at once:

  1. With the cursor at the top of the Window file, choose Window--> New Window.

    As shown in Figure 13-3, the title bar at the top of the screen says Window:2 instead of Window.

  2. Press Ctrl+End to go to the end of the document.
  3. Click Window on the menu bar to pull down the Window menu.

    Two Window files are on the menu, one called Window:1 and the other called Window:2. Notice the check mark next to Window:2. The check mark tells you that you're currently looking at the second view of the document.

  4. Click 1 Window:1 on the menu.

    Now you're back at the start of the document. If you entered some text and saved the document, the text would be saved to the Window file, not to Window:1. Only one file is on disk, the Window file; although the Window menu offers you two different views, or outlooks, on the file, only one file actually exists. All editorial changes that you make to either version are recorded in the Window file.

  5. Choose Window-->New Window.

    Now you have opened three views on the file. Yikes! Better start closing some of these views.

  6. Pull down the Control menu and choose Close to close Window:3.

    As shown in Figure 13-3, you can find the Control menu at the left of File on the menu bar. Pull down this menu by clicking it. Be sure to choose Close on the document Control menu, not on the Word 97 Control menu. If you click the W on the left side of the title bar, you will open the Word 97 Control menu, not the document Control menu.

    You can also close a window by pressing Ctrl+W.

  7. Click the Close button to close Window:1.

    You can also close a document window by clicking its Close button (the button with an X on it). Just be sure to click the document window's Close button, not the program's Close button. If you click the program's Close button, Word 97 will think that you're trying to shut down the program.

  8. Pull down the Window menu and see what it says.

    There is no longer a 2, 1, or 3 after Window on the Window menu. You're back where you started, with one view of the document.

The Window-->New Window command has an important advantage over the other methods of viewing a document in two places or viewing more than one document. When you split the screen or choose Window-->Arrange All to see all the open documents at once, you're left with little room in which to work. The Window-->New Window command gives you a panoramic, full-window look at different parts of a document.

Leave the Window file open if you care to read the "extra credit" instructions. They describe another way to work in more than one place in a document: by using bookmarks.

Marking your place with a bookmark

Yet another way to be in more than one place in a document is to use bookmarks. All you do is put a bookmark in an important spot in your document that you plan to return to many times. When you want to return to that spot, choose Insert--> Bookmark and double-click the bookmark name in the Bookmark dialog box. By creating and using bookmarks, you can hop from place to place quickly in documents.

I put several bookmarks in the Window file. To go to them, follow these steps:

  1. Choose Insert-->Bookmark.

    The Bookmark dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 13-4. Notice that the bookmark names are in alphabetical order. If you want to, you can click the Location radio button in this dialog box to make the bookmarks appear in the order in which they appear in the document.

  2. Double-click History in the dialog box.

    You go to the discussion of Canadian history on page 3. You can also go to a bookmark by clicking it in the dialog box, clicking the Go To button, and then clicking Close.

  3. Click the Close button to close the Bookmark dialog box.
  4. Scroll down a few lines.

    In the next two steps, you will create a bookmark of your own where the cursor is.

  5. Choose Insert-->Bookmark and type your own bookmark name in the Bookmark Name text box.

    Bookmark names cannot include blank spaces, but you can get around that limitation by using capital letters or underscores. For example, if you want to mark the place in a document where you discuss the gross national product, you can call the bookmark GrossNationalProd, as was done in Figure 13-4. Be sure to choose a descriptive name.

  6. Click the Add button to add your bookmark to the list.
  7. Choose Insert-->Bookmark to open the Bookmark dialog box again.

    You see your bookmark name in the list. If the list of bookmarks in the dialog box is long, you may have to click the scroll bar to see the name of the bookmark to which you want to go.

  8. Double-click Conclusion to get to the bookmark at the end of the document.

To remove a bookmark, open the Bookmark dialog box, click the name of the bookmark you want to remove, and click the Delete button.

Recess

If you want to take a break, I don't blame you in the least. This business of opening different windows, not to mention that bookmark stuff, is exhausting. If you go to recess now, don't swing the jump rope too wildly, and don't gamble your lunch money at hopscotch.

Lesson 13-3: Zooming In and Zooming Out

The eye, as nature intended it, is not meant to stare at a computer screen all day, and that makes the Zoom command all the more valuable. Instead of enlarging the type size of text, you can enlarge (or shrink) text with the Zoom command. The Zoom command doesn't alter type sizes in any way, shape, or form. All it does is change the size of the letters that appear on-screen.

This short lesson explains how to use the commands on the Zoom Control menus. To practice using the Zoom command, open the Zoom file in the Word101 folder and follow these steps:

  1. Click the down arrow on the Zoom Control menu to display the Zoom drop-down list.

    As shown in Figure 13-5, the Zoom drop-down list is on the right side of the Standard toolbar. It offers percentage settings ranging from 500% to 10%. At 500 percent, the document looks five times as large on-screen as it does when it is printed.

  2. Click 50% on the Zoom drop-down list.

    You started at 100%, so the letters shrink to half their real size.

  3. Click the down arrow on the Zoom drop-down list again and choose 200%.

    The letters get quite large. You would have little trouble reading these letters on an eye exam. Likewise, you can keep from straining your eyes by choosing a high percentage on the Zoom Control menu.

  4. Click in the Zoom box, type 125, and then press the Enter key.

    You don't have to choose from the percentages on the Zoom drop-down list. As this step demonstrates, you can choose your own percentage by typing it in the Zoom box and pressing Enter.

    The text shrinks from 200% to 125% of its real size. These letters are still large and easy to read, too.

Lesson 13-4: Inserting One Document into Another

One of the great things about word processing is that you can recycle your work. If you've written something that would fit well in a document you're working on at present, or if you've written something that would nearly fit, you can insert the old document directly into the new one and take it from there. Lesson 13-4 explains how to do so.

For this exercise in inserting one document into another, you need the Insert Document file in the Word101 folder. Open that file now and follow these steps to complete this very short lesson:

  1. Press Ctrl+End to go to the end of the document.

    You can insert a file anywhere in a document. When you choose Insert-->File, the file is inserted wherever the text cursor is located. You don't have to insert files at the end of documents, although in this case you're going to do just that.

  2. Choose Insert-->File.

    The Insert File dialog box appears. In this dialog box, you choose the file you want to insert in the same way you choose a file you want to open in the Open dialog box. For this exercise, you will insert the Print Preview file.

  3. Go to the Word101 folder.

    The file you're going to insert is in the Word101 folder. Because you just opened the Insert Document file in the Word101 folder, Word101 very likely appears in the Look In box in the Insert File dialog box. The Insert File dialog box, like the Open dialog box, always opens to the folder where the last file you opened resides. If you want to insert a file that's in a different folder, click the Up One Level button and double-click on folder names until you arrive at the folder that holds the file you want to insert.

  4. Click the Print Preview file and then click OK.

    The entire file is inserted in the document.

More than likely, you have to make a few changes when you insert a file this way. Usually, the transition from the file you're working on to the file you inserted is abrupt so you have to write a paragraph to smooth over the transition and edit the inserted file to make it fit with the original. Nevertheless, the Insert-->File command is a good one to know about. Bottles, cans, and paper aren't the only things that you can recycle.

Unit 13 Quiz

For the following questions, circle the letter of the correct answer or answers. You may find more than one right answer to each question.

1. To display different documents at the same time on-screen, choose which of these commands?

A. Window-->New Window
B. Window-->Arrange All
C. Window-->Open
D. Window-->Split
E. Insert-->File

2. To open two different views of the same document, use which of the following commands?

A. Window-->New Window
B. Window-->Arrange All
C. Window-->Split
D. File-->Open
E. Window-->Jump

3. How can you tell which is the active document on the Window menu?

A. It walks softly and carries a big stick.
B. It has the number 1 after its name.
C. It has a check mark next to its name.
D. It is the first one on the menu.
E. It is the one that fate has chosen.

4. To divide the screen in order to view two different parts of a document, you do the following:

A. Choose Window-->New Window.
B. Choose Window-->Split.
C. Choose Insert-->File.
D. Move the cursor to the top of the vertical scroll bar, and when the split cursor appears, drag it into the document window.
E. Choose Banana-->Split.

5. Where is the Zoom Control menu located?

A. On the Font Size pull-down menu
B. Two doors down and to your left
C. Where you least expect it
D. On the shortcut menu that appears when you right-click a toolbar
E. On the right side of the Standard toolbar

6. You use which of these techniques to copy one file into another?

A. Copy the text to the Clipboard, and then open the other file and paste the text.
B. Choose Insert-->File.
C. Choose File-->Open.
D. Use a Xerox machine.
E. Open both documents on-screen.

Unit 13 Exercise

Open the Window file in the Word101 folder and follow these steps to practice the techniques that I introduced in Unit 13:

1. Split the screen to see two different parts of the document.

2. Remove the split and then open a second window for the document.

3. Close the second window and go to the conclusion of the document by going to its bookmark.

4. Change the size of the letters on-screen by using commands in the Zoom Control menu.

5. Insert any old document into Window.

6. Close the Window file without saving your changes to it.

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