Dummies 101: Microsoft Office 97 for Windows (with CD-ROM)

Overview

In writing Dummies 101: Microsoft Office 97 For Windows, author Peter Weverka had one fundamental goal: to turn you into an experienced user of all the new releases in the Microsoft Office 97 suite of programs -- Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access -- in the shortest possible time. The great thing is that the plain-English, step-by-step lessons and fun quizzes you'll find in Dummies 101: Microsoft Office 97 For Windows make learning Office 97 not only easy but enjoyable, too. In no time at all you'll get...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $5.00   
  • Used (7) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$5.00
Seller since 2013

Feedback rating:

(21)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1997 Paperback New ** WE SHIP DAILY (Mon-Fri) ** Free Tracking Information.

Ships from: Brandywine, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$39.50
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(257)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(136)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

In writing Dummies 101: Microsoft Office 97 For Windows, author Peter Weverka had one fundamental goal: to turn you into an experienced user of all the new releases in the Microsoft Office 97 suite of programs -- Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access -- in the shortest possible time. The great thing is that the plain-English, step-by-step lessons and fun quizzes you'll find in Dummies 101: Microsoft Office 97 For Windows make learning Office 97 not only easy but enjoyable, too. In no time at all you'll get the hang of doing things likeĀ…
  • Formatting professional-looking Word documents
  • Building Excel spreadsheets for quick answers to all your "what-if" financial questions
  • Creating PowerPoint presentations that bring your points home with panache
  • Exchanging e-mail messages and staying organized with Outlook
  • Designing and using your own Access databases

Plus, on the Dummies 101: Companion CD included with Dummies 101: Microsoft Office 97 For Windows, you get ready-to-use sample exercise files so that you can learn Office 97 the best way possible -- hands on.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764500978
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/1/1997
  • Series: Dummies 101 Series
  • Edition description: BK&CD-ROM
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 8.49 (w) x 9.94 (h) x 0.83 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction

Whom This Book Is For
Foolish Assumptions about the Reader
What's in This Book, Anyway?
Part I: Word 97
Part II: Excel 97
Part III: PowerPoint 97
Part IV: Outlook
Part V: Access 97
Appendixes
On the CD: Bonus Stuff
Using the Dummies 101 CD-ROM
The Cast of Icons
Stuff You Should Know

Part I: Word 97

Unit 1: Getting Acquainted with Word 97 and the Other Office 97 Programs
Lesson 1-1: Starting and Closing an Office 97 Program
Lesson 1-2: Opening and Closing a File
Opening a file
Closing a file
Recess
Lesson 1-3: Ways of Viewing Documents
Lesson 1-4: Moving Around in Documents
Pressing keys to get from place to place
Scroll bar techniques and commands for moving around in a document
Lesson 1-5: Getting Help When You Need It
Getting help with buttons and commands
Getting help in an Office 97 program
Unit 1 Quiz
Unit 1 Exercise
Unit 2: Creating a Document
Lesson 2-1: Creating, Saving, and Naming a New Document
Lesson 2-2: Entering and Editing Text
Lesson 2-3: Selecting Text
Lesson 2-4: Copying and Moving Text
Moving text to new places
Copying and pasting text
Lesson 2-5: Deleting Text
Recess
Lesson 2-6: Changing Fonts and Character Styles
Unit 2 Quiz
Unit 2 Exercise
Unit 3: Polishing and Printing Your Document
Lesson 3-1: Laying Out Margins
Lesson 3-2: Indenting Text
Lesson 3-3: Handling Line Spacing
Recess
Lesson 3-4: Aligning Text in Documents
Lesson 3-5: Checking Your Spelling (And Grammar)
Lesson 3-6: Printing a File
Unit 3 Quiz
Unit 3 Exercise
Part I Review
Unit 1 Summary
Unit 2 Summary
Unit 3 Summary
Part I Test
Part I Lab Assignment

Part II: Excel 97

Unit 4: Learning the Ropes

Lesson 4-1: Creating a Worksheet
Creating a blank worksheet
Creating a worksheet from a template
Lesson 4-2: Finding Your Way around a Worksheet
Lesson 4-3: Entering and Editing the Data
Lesson 4-4: Copying, Moving, and Deleting Data
Recess
Lesson 4-5: Viewing Worksheets
Lesson 4-6: Printing a Worksheet
Unit 4 Quiz
Unit 4 Exercise
Unit 5: Making a Worksheet Look Just Right
Lesson 5-1: Formatting Numbers and Text
Lesson 5-2: Changing the Width and Height of Columns and Rows
Lesson 5-3: Inserting and Deleting Columns and Rows
Lesson 5-4: Aligning Numbers and Text
Lesson 5-5: Applying Borders, Patterns, and Colors
Putting borders on a worksheet
Applying colors and patterns
Unit 5 Quiz
Unit 5 Exercise
Unit 6: Generating Numbers and Results
Lesson 6-1: Constructing and Copying Formulas
Lesson 6-2: Using Functions in Formulas
Using AutoSum to add numbers in cells
Using the Paste function and Function Wizard
Recess
Lesson 6-3: Using Range Names in Formulas
Lesson 6-4: Building a Chart from Your Data
Unit 6 Quiz
Unit 6 Exercise
Part II Review
Unit 4 Summary
Unit 5 Summary
Unit 6 Summary
Part II Test
Part II Lab Assignment
Part III: PowerPoint 97
Unit 7: Laying the Groundwork
Lesson 7-1: Creating a Presentation
Creating a presentation by using the AutoContent Wizard
Creating a presentation from a template
Creating a presentation by inserting slides
Lesson 7-2: Four Ways to View and Work on Slides
Lesson 7-3: Entering and Formatting Text
Lesson 7-4: Choosing Designs for Slides
Recess
Lesson 7-5: Dressing Up Slides with Clip Art
Unit 7 Quiz
Unit 7 Exercise
Unit 8: Show Time!
Lesson 8-1: Previewing a Presentation
Lesson 8-2: Giving a Presentation
Recess
Lesson 8-3: Giving a Timed, Automatic Presentation
Lesson 8-4: Printing a Handout
Unit 8 Quiz
Unit 8 Exercise
Part III Review
Unit 7 Summary
Unit 8 Summary
Part III Test
Part III Lab Assignment
Part IV: Outlook

Unit 9: Communicating with Outlook

Lesson 9-1: Finding Your Way around Outlook
Lesson 9-2: Writing, Editing, and Sending Messages
Lesson 9-3: Receiving and Reading Messages
Recess
Lesson 9-4: Storing and Sorting Messages
Creating folders and storing messages in them
Reading messages in folders
Deleting messages
Lesson 9-5: Replying to and Forwarding Messages
Unit 9 Quiz
Unit 9 Exercise
Unit 10: Staying Organized with Outlook
Lesson 10-1: Scheduling Meetings and Appointments on the Calendar
Recess
Lesson 10-2: Creating and Maintaining a Contacts List
Entering names, addresses, and other information
Finding names in and maintaining a Contacts list
Lesson 10-3: Maintaining and Prioritizing a Task List
Unit 10 Quiz
Unit 10 Exercise
Part IV Review
Unit 9 Summary
Unit 10 Summary
Part IV Test
Part IV Lab Assignment
Part V: Access 97

Unit 11: Learning Your Databasics

Lesson 11-1: Creating a Database Table
Recess
Lesson 11-2: Entering the Data in a Datasheet
Lesson 11-3: Creating and Using Forms to Enter Data
Lesson 11-4: Moving and Deleting Records and Fields
Unit 11 Quiz
Unit 11 Exercise
Unit 12: Getting the Data Out
Lesson 12-1: Filtering a Database to Find Information
Lesson 12-2: Querying to Find Data and Combine Database Tables
Querying to get the data out
Queries for combining data from different tables
Recess
Lesson 12-3: Sorting a Database
Lesson 12-4: Generating and Printing Reports
Unit 12 Quiz
Unit 12 Exercise
Part V Review
Unit 11 Summary
Unit 12 Summary
Part V Test
Part V Lab Assignment
Appendix A: Test Answers
Part I Answers
Part II Answers
Part III Answers
Part IV Answers
Part V Answers
Appendix B: About the CD
System Requirements
What's on the CD
Putting the CD Files on Your Hard Drive
Installing the icons
Installing the exercise files
Accessing the exercise files
Removing the exercise files and icons
Using the Acrobat Reader to Read and Print Units 13 and 14
Installing and running the Acrobat Reader
Reading and printing Units 13 and 14 with the Acrobat Reader

Index

License Agreement

Installation Instructions

Reader Response Card

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Unit 1

Getting Acquainted with Word 97 and the Other Office 97 Programs

Objectives for This Unit

  • Opening and closing Office 97 programs
  • Opening a file so that you can work on it
  • Viewing documents in different ways
  • Moving around in documents big and small
  • Getting instructions from the Help program

This unit describes the basics of running a Microsoft Office 97 program, whether the program is Word 97, Excel 97, PowerPoint 97, Outlook, or Access 97. The day is soon coming when you can trade information back and forth across the different programs in Office 97, and to prepare for that happy day, I explain how to open several programs at once and how to switch from one program to the other. In this unit, you also learn how to open a file in any Office 97 program.

I show you the different parts of the Word 97 screen, too. If you ventured into Word 97 already, you know that the screen is cluttered with buttons showing funny symbols, arrows that point every which way, and menus that sport peculiar names. You figure out what some of these interesting items are in Part I and how to get a different view of your work on-screen.

This unit also explains how to move around on-screen and how to get instructions from Office 97 in case you're confronted with a task that you don't know how to handle yet.

Lesson 1-1: Starting and Closing an Office 97 Program

Obviously, you can't write a 100-page report in Word 97, create an elaborate Excel 97 chart, dazzle viewers with a PowerPoint 97 slide-show presentation, sort through e-mail messages in Outlook, or mine for data in an Access 97 database until you start the programs.

Luckily for you, starting an Office 97 program is as easy as falling off a turnip truck. This lesson describes how to start and close down the programs in Office 97. The lesson also explains how to run several programs at once and switch from one to the other.

To learn how to open the Office 97 programs, turn on your computer and follow these steps:

  1. Click the Start button on the taskbar.
  2. Click means to move the mouse pointer over something and press the left mouse button quickly. When you move the mouse pointer over something you can click, the mouse turns into an arrow.

    As shown in Figure 1-1, the taskbar is located along the bottom of the Windows 95 screen. The Start button is on the left, in the lower-left corner of the screen.

    After you click the Start button, the Start menu appears.

  3. Choose Programs on the Start menu.
  4. The fastest way to choose Programs is to click the word Programs with the mouse, but you can also press the letter P or press the up arrow key until you highlight Programs.

    After you click Programs, another menu appears (if you chose Programs by pressing the up arrow key, press the right arrow key now to see the menu). On this menu is an alphabetical list of the programs installed on your computer. On this menu, if you look closely, you see the name Microsoft Word.

  5. Choose Microsoft Word to open Word 97.
  6. To choose Microsoft Word on this menu, either click Microsoft Word or press the down arrow key; key until you highlight Microsoft Word and then press the Enter key.

    After a moment or two, a screen with the words Microsoft Word 97 appears, and then you see the program itself on-screen. If you're running Word 97 for the first time, you also see the Office Assistant -- an animated figure (with an ugly face) who invites you to learn about Word 97. Ignore him for now (Lesson 1-5 explains the Office Assistant and how it works).

    In the next step, you open Excel 97.

  7. Click the Start button, choose Programs, and choose Microsoft Excel.
  8. Now a screen with the words Microsoft Excel 97 appears, and Excel 97 opens. Two programs, Word 97 and Excel 97, are now running, but only Excel 97 appears on-screen. Suppose, however, that you want to get back to Word 97.

  9. Click the Microsoft Word button on the taskbar.
  10. As soon as you click this button, you see the Word 97 screen again. (If you wanted to copy text from a Word 97 document to an Excel 97 worksheet, you could do so by clicking buttons on the taskbar and switching back and forth between the programs.)

  11. Click the Start button, choose Programs, and choose Microsoft PowerPoint.
  12. Now three Office 97 programs are running and, not coincidentally, three buttons appear on the taskbar. But how do you close these programs? Read on.

  13. Click the Cancel button in the PowerPoint dialog box sitting in the middle of the screen to tell PowerPoint 97 that you don't want to create a presentation and then click the Close button in the upper-right corner of the PowerPoint 97 window.
  14. Clicking the Close button (the X) in the upper-right corner of a window is the fastest way to close a program, but you have other ways to accomplish the same task, as the following two steps demonstrate.

    Make sure that you click the Close button and not either of the two buttons to its left. Those buttons are for minimizing the program window and shrinking the window in size.

  15. Right-click the Microsoft Excel button on the taskbar and, after the shortcut menu appears, click the Close command on the shortcut menu.
  16. Right-click means to click with the right mouse button, not the left one. After you click the Close button, Excel 97 disappears and its button is removed from the taskbar.

  17. Back in Word 97, choose File-->Exit.
  18. You can always choose File-->Exit to shut down a program. To choose this command, either click File on the menu bar and then click the menu's Exit command or press Alt+F to open the File menu and then press the X key (the underlined letter in the menu's Exit command).

Now you're back where you started, at the Windows 95 desktop. Click the Start button, choose Programs, and then choose Microsoft Word to open the program so that you can go on to the next lesson.

Lesson 1-2: Opening and Closing a File

After you save and close a file (Unit 2 explains how), you must open the file again before you can work on it. This lesson explains how to open a file -- in this case, a Word 97 document -- and how to close the file after you open it. The techniques for opening files are the same, no matter which Office 97 program you're running.

Throughout this book, I ask you to open practice files in the Office 101 folder. Get good at opening files so that you save yourself a lot of time down the road. To help you get good at this process, this lesson includes an extra credit shortcut for opening files quickly (see "Opening files from the Favorites folder" in this unit for the details).

If you haven't installed the practice files for this book yet, please see the instructions for installing the files in the introduction, in Appendix B, or on the last page of this book.

Opening a file

For this lesson, you open a file called Open that's located in the Office 101 folder. To open this file, make sure that Word 97 is running and then carry out the following steps:

  1. Choose File-->Open.
  2. You can also press Ctrl+O or click the Open button on the Standard toolbar. Whichever route you take, you see the Open dialog box, as shown in Figure 1-2.

    From this dialog box, you can access any file on your computer, including the Open file in the Office 101 folder. To access the file you want, you click buttons or double-click folders in the Open dialog box.

  3. Click the Up One Level button as many times as necessary for the C drive to appear in the Look in drop-down list box.
  4. The Up One Level button is labeled in Figure 1-2. Each time you click this button, you move up in the hierarchy of folders. After the C drive appears in the Look In text box, you know you're at the top of the folder hierarchy. You know you've reached the C drive when you see a computer icon followed by some text and (C:). To move down the hierarchy, you double-click the names of the folders that appear in the Open dialog box.

  5. Double-click the Office 101 folder.
  6. Now you see the files in the Office 101 folder. To open one of these files, all you need to do is double-click the name of the file in the list or click the filename and then click the Open button. Before doing so, however, check out the different ways of viewing files in the Open dialog box.

  7. Click the Details button.
  8. The Open dialog box tells you how big each file is, which program was used to create the file, and when the file was last modified. Look in the Type column if you aren't sure which file belongs to which program -- the information in that column tells you straightaway.

  9. Click the Properties button.
  10. Now the Open dialog box tells you who created the file, how many times the file was revised, and how much time was spent creating the file, among other things.

  11. Click the Preview button.
  12. You get a thumbnail view of the file. Click the Details, Properties, and Preview buttons if you can't quite remember the name of a file you want to open or if you aren't sure what is in a file.

  13. Click the List button.
  14. Click the List button to access a plain but exhaustive list of the files in the folder you double-clicked.

  15. Select the Open file in the Open dialog box.
  16. To select a file, click its name. If you do so successfully, the filename is highlighted on-screen.

  17. Click the Open button to open the file.
  18. If you are a speed demon, you can bypass Step 9 and simply double-click a file in the Open dialog box to open that file straightaway.

By the way, the bottom of the File menu lists the last four files you opened. To open one of those files, all you need to do is open the File menu and either click a filename in the menu or press 1, 2, 3, or 4 on the keyboard.

Closing a file

Closing a file is pretty simple. All you need to do to close the file you just opened -- or to close any file for that matter -- is to choose File-->Close. To do so, click File on the menu bar and then click the Close command or press Alt+F to open the File menu and then press the C key, C being the underlined letter in the word Close on the File menu.

By the way, suppose that you're the adventurous sort and you typed a word or two in the Open file that I had you open just now. If you did type a word or two before closing the file, you see a dialog box that asks whether you want to save the changes you made before you close the file. Saving changes to a file is explained in detail in Lesson 2-2. For now, click the No button to tell Word 97 to close the file without saving any changes.

Opening files from the Favorites folder

Clicking the Up One Level button and double-clicking folders in the Open dialog box to find a file you want to open can be a hassle, especially if the document is buried deep inside your computer. To make finding and opening files easier, Word 97 offers the Favorites folder.

By putting shortcuts to the folders and files you use most often in the Favorites folder, you can open files and folders much, much faster. Here's how to put a shortcut to the Office 101 folder in the Favorites folder:

  1. Choose File-->Open, press Ctrl+O, or click the Open button so that the Open dialog box appears on-screen.
  2. In the Open dialog box, find and display the Office 101 folder (the start of this lesson explains how).
  3. Click the Office 101 folder to select it.
  4. Click the Add to Favorites button in the Open dialog box.

    You can see this button in Figure 1-2. When you click the button, a small menu appears with two options: Add 'Disk_vol1 (c:)' to Favorites or Add Selected Item to Favorites.

  5. Click Add Selected Item to Favorites, because you want to create a shortcut to the Office 101 folder, the item you selected in Step 3.
  6. Still in the Open dialog box, click the Look in Favorites button (see Figure 1-2).

    Word 97 takes you to the Favorites folder, where you see a shortcut icon to the Office 101 folder. Shortcut icons have little arrows in the lower-left corner.

  7. Double-click the Office 101 shortcut icon.

    Word 97 takes you to the Office 101 folder. If you want to open a file in this folder, all you need to do is click the flilename and then click the Open button.

  8. Click the Cancel button or press Esc to leave the Open dialog box.

Throughout this book, I ask you to open practice files in the Office 101 folder. Now that you have created a shortcut to that folder, you can get to the Office 101 folder quicker than you can say "Microsoft Office 97."

Recess

If you want to take a break right now, I don't blame you in the least. You're free to go to recess. But no pushing in the hallways. And if I catch any of you pulling hair, I'm sending you straight to the principal's office. By the way, if you want to turn the computer off, go right ahead (after you have closed all your programs, of course). But be sure to turn it on again and start Word 97 before you begin the next lesson.

Lesson 1-3: Ways of Viewing Documents

Lesson 1-3 leaves the other Office 97 programs behind and starts focusing on Word 97, the word-processing program. As a matter of fact, this lesson focuses on the part of the program that your eyes focus on while you're word-processing: the Word 97 screen. This lesson also explains techniques for viewing documents.

You can view Word 97 documents in Normal View, Online Layout View, Page Layout View, and Full Screen View. You can also zoom in or out to make the words and letters bigger or smaller. To learn how to look at documents in different views and decide which view is best for you, follow these steps:

  1. Start Word 97 (if the program isn't running already) and then open the View file in the Office 101 folder.

    The previous lesson in this book explains how to open a document, in case you've forgotten.

    When I saved the View file after I created it, the document was in Normal View, so the document appears in Normal View when you open the file. When you are writing a first draft of a document and need to focus on the words, Normal View is the way to go.

  2. Click the Online Layout View button in the lower-left corner of the screen to change to Online Layout View.

    Another way to switch to Online Layout View is to choose View-->Online Layout. Now you see something extraordinary: The document changes color and a pair of scales appear. You can see page backgrounds only in Online Layout View. This view is designed for creating and viewing documents that people see online -- that is, on computer screens. Use Online Layout View to design Web pages, for example.

    Notice, however, that the scales in the View file appear out of place. In Normal View, you can't see graphics, and in Online Layout View, graphics do not appear in their rightful places. To place graphics correctly, you must view the document in Page Layout View.

  3. Choose View-->Page Layout.

    You can also get to Page Layout View by clicking the Page Layout View button. (In Online Layout View, however, the View buttons aren't available, because Word 97 wants more room for displaying documents.)

    In Page Layout View, you can see precisely where the graphic (the scales) will appear when the document is printed. You can also see a header and the top of the page itself. Headers and footers, the lines of text that appear at the top and bottom of pages and list the title of the work, its author, and other pertinent information, only appear in Page Layout view. Do layout work in Page Layout view so you can see what your document will look like when it is printed.

  4. Click the Zoom drop-down list and choose 50%.

    As shown in Figure 1-3, the Zoom drop-down list is on the right side of the Standard toolbar. To open a drop-down list, click the little downward-pointing arrow that appears next to the list box.

    Now you get a bird's-eye view of the document, and you can really see how it's laid out. Besides "zooming out," you can also "zoom in," as the following step demonstrates.

  5. Click in the Zoom list box, type 130, and press the Enter key.

    Besides choosing Zoom percentages from the drop-down list, you can enter your own Zoom settings. Zooming in is a great way to increase the size of words on-screen and make documents easier to read. When you zoom in or zoom out, the type size of letters in the document does not change -- only their appearance on-screen changes.

  6. Choose View-->Full Screen.

    Here is yet another way to view documents. In Full Screen View, everything is stripped from the screen except the document itself. Now you can really focus on your work. But what about the menus, toolbars, and scroll bars? Suppose that you want to choose a menu command?

  7. Gently move the mouse pointer to the top of the screen to see the menu bar.

    The menu bar appears as the pointer touches the top of the screen. Now you can choose commands from the menu. Of course, you can also choose commands in Full Screen View by pressing Alt and a letter.

  8. Click the Close Full Screen button to leave Full Screen View.

    You land back where you started, in Page Layout View.

  9. Close the View file by choosing File-->Close and then click the No button when Word 97 asks whether you want to save your changes to the document.

    So ends the tour of views in Word 97. I hope the view was good from where you were sitting.

Lesson 1-4: Moving Around in Documents

Word 97 files have a habit of getting longer. And the longer a document gets, the more difficult moving around inside the document becomes. Fasten your seat belt. This lesson explains tried-and-true techniques for getting around in Word 97 and other Office 97 files very quickly.

To get from place to place in a document, you can press keys, use the scroll bars, or choose menu commands. Open the Hurry Up file in the Office 101 folder to practice moving around quickly in a file.

Pressing keys to get from place to place

Check out these keyboard techniques for moving around in files:

  1. Press and hold the right arrow key.

    When you do this, the text cursor rockets through the text, first to the right side of the screen and then to the next line.

  2. Press and hold the left arrow key.

    The cursor rockets in the other direction. You can also press the up arrow or down arrow key to move the cursor up or down on-screen.

  3. With the cursor in the middle of a line, press the Home key.

    The cursor moves to the beginning of the line. To quickly move the cursor to the right side of a line, press the End key.

  4. Press Ctrl+End.

    The cursor moves to the end of the document. Look at the status bar along the bottom of the screen right above the taskbar. It reads, among other things, Page 18 and 18/18. You can always tell by glancing at the status bar what page the text cursor is on and how many pages are in the document. If the text cursor were on page 15, the status bar would read, Page 15 and 15/18.

  5. Press Ctrl+Home.

    Now you're at the very beginning of the document. In tandem with the Ctrl key, pressing an arrow key or a direction key such as End or Home gives the cursor an extra boost and makes the cursor travel far. Pressing Ctrl+left arrow key, for example, moves the cursor to the left an entire word, and pressing Ctrl+right arrow key moves the cursor right an entire word.

  6. Press PgDn and then PgUp.

    Your view of the document moves down by the length of one screen and then up by the length of one screen.

Don't close the Hurry Up document just yet. You need this file to try out scroll bar techniques and Word 97 commands for moving around in documents.

Scroll bar techniques and commands for moving around in a document

Besides pressing keys, you can click the scroll bar and choose commands to get around in a long document. The scroll bar is the elevator shaft on the right side of the window. By clicking the arrow at the top or bottom, by dragging the scroll box -- the elevator -- you can get from place to place. Figure 1-4 shows the scroll bar. There is a second scroll bar along the bottom of the window for scrolling left and right.

  1. Click the arrow that points down at the bottom of the scroll bar on the right side of the screen.

    With each click, the screen scrolls down a line.

  2. Click the arrow that points up at the top of the scroll bar.

    By clicking the up arrow, you scroll the screen upward a line at a time.

  3. Drag the scroll box down the scroll bar.

    Drag means to click something -- the scroll box, in this case -- hold down the mouse button, roll the mouse pointer across the screen, and then release the mouse button after you finish dragging.

    Now you're really moving. As you drag the scroll box down the scroll bar, a yellow box appears. It tells you to which page you're moving. (In the Hurry Up document, I assigned styles to headings, so the yellow box also lists headings as you scroll past them. I don't explain styles in this book, but I can tell you that you can format headings in documents by making choices from the Style menu on the Formatting toolbar.) When you are done dragging and release the mouse button, you see a new part of the document.

  4. Press the right arrow key once.

    Whoa, Cowboy! What happened? You're back where you started from before you dragged the scroll box. That happened because scrolling through a document does not actually move the text cursor -- it just shows you different pages. To actually move the text cursor, you must click in the document after you scroll to a new place.

  5. Drag the scroll box down the scroll bar a second time and then click the document after you finish scrolling.

    Now you did it -- you moved the text cursor as well as scrolled to a new page.

  6. Click a few times above the scroll box (but not on the upward-pointing arrow).

    Each time you click, you scroll up by the length of one screen. To scroll down a document this way, click below the scroll box but not on the arrow that points down.

  7. Click the Previous Page button directly below the scroll bar.

    The screen scrolls up by one page. The Previous Page button has two little arrows on it. Below this button lies the Select Browse Object button, a circle, and below that lies the Next Page button. Click the Next Page button to scroll down a page.

    By clicking the Select Browse Object, you can scroll, not to the next page, but to other places in a document.

  8. Click the Select Browse Object button and then gently move the pointer over the Browse by buttons on the drop-down list that appears.

    After you click the button, a menu of Browse by buttons appears. By clicking one of these buttons, you can make the Previous Page and Next Page buttons take you through a document to the next field, endnote, footnote, comment, page, heading graphic, or table. You can also tell Word 97 to find text in a document or go to a specific page.

  9. Click the Browse by Heading button.

    As I mentioned earlier, I assigned heading styles to the headings in the Hurry Up document. You must have assigned styles to headings to browse by headings in a document.

  10. Click what used to be called the Previous Page button -- the two little upward-pointing arrows.

    Now the button is blue, not black, and it is called the Previous Heading button. After you click it, you move to the previous heading in the document. Try clicking this button and the blue Next Heading button a few times.

    If you want to make the buttons take you from page to page again instead of from heading to heading, click the Select Browse Object button again and choose Browse by Page.

  11. Choose Edit-->Go To to see the Go To tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.

    From this dialog box, you can tell Word 97 to take you to a specific page. Word 97 offers two other ways to open this dialog box: Press Ctrl+G or click the Select Browse Object button and then click the Go To button.

  12. Type 8 in the Enter page number text box, click the Go To button, and then click Close or press Esc.

    You land safely on page 8 of the Hurry Up document. Close the Hurry Up document now and take a deep breath. (If you can't remember how to close a document, see Lesson 1-2.)

Between the keyboard shortcuts, the scroll bar techniques, and the Browse by buttons, you can surely get where you want to go in a hurry with Word 97.

Lesson 1-5: Getting Help When You Need It

Dare I say that this slender book doesn't explain every task you can do in Office 97? I would need another thousand pages to explain everything. All is not lost, however, if you want to try something that isn't explained in this book, because you can always seek guidance from the Help program.

The makers of Office 97 understand the importance of helping the needy, so the Office 97 programs offer many ways to seek help. The following pages describe techniques for getting help with the commands and buttons in an Office 97 program and how to open and get help from the Help programs that come with Word 97, Excel 97, PowerPoint 97, Outlook, and Access 97.

Getting help with buttons and commands

To explore the ways to get help inside Word 97 and the other Office 97 programs, open Word 97, type a few words on-screen, and follow these steps:

  1. Gently slide the pointer over a toolbar button.

    The button's name appears in a small yellow or white box. If you know to press a button but aren't sure which one is which, you can find out a button's name this way. (If you don't see the yellow box, somebody's been playing with the toolbar settings. Choose View-->Toolbars-->Customize, click the Options tab in the Customize dialog box, click the Show ScreenTips on Toolbars check box, and then click Close.)

  2. Choose Help-->What's This or press Shift+F1.

    You see the Help cursor, a pointer with a question mark beside it. As long as you see the Help cursor, you can click a part of the screen to see what it does.

  3. Click a toolbar button.

    A lengthy description of the button appears in a handy yellow box. Besides clicking part of the screen, you can also click text to find out how it has been formatted.

  4. Choose Help-->What's This or press Shift+F1 again, but this time click the words you typed on-screen.

    A gray box tells you how the paragraph you typed is formatted and in which font the characters appear. If you have trouble telling how text is formatted, click the Help cursor in the text.

  5. Press Esc to shake off the Help cursor.

    Now you're back where you started and can check out another technique for getting Help.

  6. Choose Format-->Font to open the Font dialog box.

    In the upper-right corner of dialog boxes you see a question mark. By clicking the question mark and then clicking a dialog box option, you can find out what the option is good for.

  7. Click the question mark in the Font dialog box and then click the text box or list box under Font Style.

    As Figure 1-5 shows, a yellow box appears with a synopsis of the Word 97 font styles. If you don't know what an option does or are searching for an option in a dialog box, you can get help this way.

  8. Click Cancel or press Esc to close the Font dialog box.

Now you will open the Word 97 Help program to seek Help. Read on.

Getting help in an Office 97 program

These techniques for accessing Help in any Office 97 program serve you whether you're working in Word 97, Excel 97, PowerPoint 97, Outlook, or Access 97. To access the Help program, follow these steps:

  1. Choose Help-->Contents and Index.

    The Help dialog box offers two tabs that are very useful for finding Help: the Contents and Index tabs.

  2. Click the Contents tab, if necessary, and then double-click one of the book icons.

    Beside each book icon is a topic name. After you find a topic that interests you, double-click its book icon. You see either more book icons or question mark icons with subtopic names beside them. I hope the subject you need help with is listed here. If not, click the down arrow on the scroll bar to view more topics and subtopics.

  3. Double-click a subtopic icon.

    The Help program opens and displays a list of instructions. Notice that the Help program appears in its own window. If you want, you can click the Word 97 document, start working away, and read instructions from the Help window as you go. Or you can click the Help window's Minimize button and, if you need instructions, click the Help program button on the taskbar to see the instructions again.

  4. Click the Help Topics button in the Help window.

    You return to the Help Topics dialog box, where you can get Help another way.

  5. Click the Index tab.

    As shown in Figure 1-6, you see the Index tab. On the Index tab, topics are arranged in alphabetical order, as they are in the index of a book.

  6. In the text box (box 1), type the name of a topic you are interested in.

    The list of topics in box 2 scrolls to the topic you entered -- or to a similarly spelled topic if your topic isn't on the list. To get to a topic, you can either type its name or use the scroll bar on the right side of box 2.

  7. Double-click a topic in the list in box 2 or click a topic in the list and then click the Display button.

    A new set of instructions appears in the Help program window.

  8. Click the Back button in the Help program window.

    By clicking this nifty button, you can go back to the Help screen you saw previously -- in this case, the one you got to by way of the Contents tab. Click the Back button if you're investigating several topics at once and you want to backtrack.

  9. Click the Close button to exit the Help program.

    Now you can test the Office Assistant, the other means of getting Help in Office 97.

  10. Click the Office Assistant button or press F1.

    The Office Assistant button is the rightmost button on the Standard toolbar (it has a light bulb and a balloon with a question mark on it). After you click the button, the Office Assistant, an animated figure you're likely to find either indispensable or pesky, depending on your point of view, appears on-screen.

    Under What would you like to do?, you can type a question, click the Search button, and pray for an answer.

  11. Type a question in the white box in the Office Assistant window and hope for the best.

    Questions should be short and to the point. The Office Assistant is not particularly intelligent. With luck, an answer to your question appears on-screen. (Personally, I think the Office Assistant is a bother, but you may like the feature.)

  12. Click the Office Assistant's Close button (the X in the upper-right corner) to make the Office Assistant leave the screen.

So ends our foray into the Help program. Very soon, you will become a crackerjack user of Office 97 and find yourself delving into the Help program to discover how to do new things. Happy hunting!

Unit 1 Quiz

For the following questions, circle the letter of the correct answer or answers. This short quiz is designed to help you remember what you learned in Unit 1. Each question may have more than one right answer.

  1. Where is the taskbar located?

    A. Beside the toolbars.

    B. Beside the scroll bar.

    C. In the gym.

    D. Along the bottom of the screen.

    E. In a corner of the garage.

  2. To start an Office 97 program, you perform this action:

    A. Press F1 and ask the Office Assistant for Help.

    B. Shake the Magic 8-Ball.

    C. Click the Start button on the taskbar, choose Programs, and then choose the Office 97 program you want to open.

    D. Choose File-->Open.

    E. None of the above.

  3. To open a file, you perform the following action:

    A. Grab the handle on the file cabinet and give the drawer a pull.

    B. Choose File-->Open, find and click the file's name in the Open dialog box, and then click the Open button.

    C. Click the File menu to open it, and if the file is one the four listed at the bottom of the menu, click the file's name in the menu.

    D. Choose File-->New.

    E. B and C.

  4. Where are the Word 97 View buttons on the screen?

    A. In the lower-left corner of the screen.

    B. On the toolbar below the menu bar.

    C. Where the view is best.

    D. On the View menu.

    E. Way up there in the right corner of the screen.

  5. To go quickly to the start of a document, press which of the following:

    A. F1.

    B. Home.

    C. The up arrow key.

    D. Ctrl+Home.

    E. Close and then open the document real fast.

  6. To move through a document with the scroll bar along the right side of the screen, you perform the following action:

    A. Click the down arrow to move down a line at a time.

    B. Click the scroll bar to move a screen at a time.

    C. Drag the scroll box.

    D. Click the up arrow to move up a line at a time.

    E. All the above.

  7. Which of the following techniques for getting Help in Office 97 costs $30?

    A. Pressing F1.

    B. Choosing Help-->Contents and Index.

    C. Choosing Help-->What's This.

    D. Calling Microsoft Tech Support at (206) 635-4948.

    E. Clicking the question mark button in a dialog box.

Unit 1 Exercise

  1. Close and then reopen Word 97.
  2. Open the file called Open in the Office 101 folder.
  3. Switch to Page Layout View.
  4. Move to the bottom of the document by using the vertical scroll bar and then read the secret message in the footer.
  5. Move to the top of the document by pressing keys.
  6. Get Help on the following topics: fonts, menus, and footers. (You can use any method you want to find Help.)
  7. Close the Open document and click No after Word 97 asks whether you want to save your changes.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)