Dune: The Butlerian Jihad (Legends of Dune Series #1) [NOOK Book]

Overview


Frank Herbert's Dune series is one of the grandest epics in the annals of imaginative literature. Selling millions of copies worldwide, it is science fiction's answer to The Lord of the Rings, a brilliantly imaginative epic of high adventure, unforgettable characters, and immense scope.

Decades after Herbert's original novels, the Dune saga was continued by Frank Herbert's son, Brian Herbert, an acclaimed SF novelist in his own right, in ...
See more details below
Dune: The Butlerian Jihad (Legends of Dune Series #1)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$8.99
BN.com price

Overview


Frank Herbert's Dune series is one of the grandest epics in the annals of imaginative literature. Selling millions of copies worldwide, it is science fiction's answer to The Lord of the Rings, a brilliantly imaginative epic of high adventure, unforgettable characters, and immense scope.

Decades after Herbert's original novels, the Dune saga was continued by Frank Herbert's son, Brian Herbert, an acclaimed SF novelist in his own right, in collaboration with Kevin J. Anderson. Their New York Times bestselling trilogy, Dune: House Atreides, Dune: House Harkonnen, and Dune: House Corrino, formed a prequel to the classic Herbert series that was acclaimed by reviewers and readers alike. Now Herbert and Anderson, working from Frank Herbert's own notes, reveal a pivotal epoch in the history of the Dune universe, the chapter of the saga most eagerly anticipated by readers: The Butlerian Jihad.

Throughout the Dune novels, Frank Herbert frequently referred to the long-ago war in which humans wrested their freedom from "thinking machines." Now, in Dune: Butlerian Jihad, Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson bring to life the story of that war, a tale previously seen only in tantalizing hints and clues. Finally, we see how Serena Butler's passionate grief ignites the war that will liberate humans from their machine masters. We learn the circumstances of the betrayal that made mortal enemies of House Atreides and House Harkonnen; and we experience the Battle of Corrin that created a galactic empire that lasted until the reign of Emperor Shaddam IV.

Herein are the foundations of the Bene Gesserit Sisterhood, the Suk Doctors, the Order of Mentats, and the mysteriously altered Navigators of the Spacing Guild. Here is the amazing tale of the Zensunni Wanderers, who escape bondage to flee to the desert world where they will declare themselves the Free Men of Dune. And here is the backward, nearly forgotten planet of Arrakis, where traders have discovered the remarkable properties of the spice melange . . . .

Ten thousand years before the events of Dune, humans have managed to battle the remorseless Machines to a standstill . . . but victory may be short-lived. Yet amid shortsighted squabbling between nobles, new leaders have begun to emerge. Among them are Xavier Harkonnen, military leader of the Planet of Salusa Secundus; Xavier's fiancée, Serena Butler, an activist who will become the unwilling leader of millions; and Tio Holtzman, the scientist struggling to devise a weapon that will help the human cause. Against the brute efficiency of their adversaries, these leaders and the human race have only imagination, compassion, and the capacity for love. It will have to be enough.

At the publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management software (DRM) applied.


Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The sands of time have not diminished the impact Dune has had on the evolution of SF, and this new prequel by Frank Herbert's son and bestseller Anderson, following 2001's Dune: House Corrino (the concluding volume of their "House" trilogy), offers the kind of intricate plotting and philosophical musings that would make the elder Herbert proud. Reaching back into the beginnings of Arrakis, the authors show us Selim, a boy cast out by his tribe who discovers how to ride the fearsome giant sandworms. Selim tastes and learns the visionary power of the magical spice, melange, and how the future of Arrakis hinges on who controls it. At the same time, on planets far removed from the desolate dunes of Arrakis, others are involved in a Great Revolt. Free League World humans, led by Tercero Xavier Harkonnen and Serena Butler of Salusa Secundus, battle Omnius, a computer "evermind" intent on extending its dominion. The ominous Omnius seeks to conquer all planets not yet incorporated into his Synchronized Worlds system with the help of servile robotic extensions and colleagues, including Erasmus, a Thinking Machine "Hannibal Lecter" whose whimsical Mr. Spock-ish meditations enliven the proceedings immeasurably. Throughout, key revelations regarding the Zensunni Wanderers and their fight for freedom and other historical Dune elements lend an air of discovery to this fast-paced tale. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Ten thousand years before the fall of the Imperial House Corrino, two grand interplanetary organizations ruled the known universe: the Synchronized Worlds, presided over by thinking machines led by the evermind called Omnius, and the League of Nobles, beleaguered survivors of the machines' revolt against the Old Empire. In this era, a few individuals determined to overturn the rule of the machines sought every opportunity to gain insights into ways to defeat the human race's most intractable enemy. Herbert and Anderson (Dune: House Atreides; Dune: House Harkonnen; Dune: House Corrino) continue their prehistory of Frank Herbert's "Dune" series with a new trilogy opener set in the distant past of Herbert's galactic saga. The authors reveal the origins of the Spacing Guild and the Bene Gesserit, as well as the root of the ancient feud between Houses Atreides and Harkonnen. This compelling saga of men and women struggling for their freedom is required reading for Dune fans and an essential purchase for libraries. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher
"This is a good, steady, enjoyable tale...Fans who will be sorry to see the end of this series will be heartened by the hint that the Dune saga is far from over." -Publishers Weekly on Dune: House Corrino

"Rich interweaving of politics and plotting made tbhe Dune novels special. And Dune: House Atreides does its predecessors justice." - USA Today

"A spirited and entertaining adventure...The real pleasure here comes from watching the authors lay out the plot threads that will converge in Dune." -The Philadelphia Inquirer on Dune: House Atreides

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429955904
  • Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
  • Publication date: 4/1/2010
  • Series: Dune , #1
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 624
  • Sales rank: 56,555
  • File size: 878 KB

Meet the Author

Brian Herbert

Brian Herbert, the author of numerous novels and short stories, has been critically acclaimed by leading reviewers in the United States and around the world. The eldest son of science fiction superstar Frank Herbert, he, with Kevin J. Anderson, is the author of Hellhole and continues his father’s beloved Dune series with books including The Winds of Dune, House Atreides, Sandworms of Dune, among other bestsellers. He also wrote a biography of his father, Dreamer of Dune. Herbert graduated from high school at age 16, and then attended U.C. Berkeley, where he earned a B.A. in Sociology. Besides an author, Herbert has been an editor, business manager, board game inventor, creative consultant for television and collectible card games, insurance agent, award-winning encyclopedia salesman, waiter, busboy, maid and a printer. He and his wife once owned a double-decker London bus, which they converted into an unusual gift shop. Herbert and his wife, Jan, have three daughters. They live in Washington state.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt


Princess Irulan writes:

Any true student must realize that History has no beginning. Regardless of where a story starts, there are always earlier heroes and earlier tragedies.
Before one can understand Muad'Dib or the current jihad that followed the overthrow of my father, Emperor Shaddam IV, one must understand what we fight against. Therefore, look more than ten thousand years into our past, ten millennia before the birth of Paul Atreides.
It is there that we see the founding of the Imperium, how an emperor rose from the ashes of the Battle of Corrin to unify the bruised remnants of humanity. We will delve into the most ancient records, into the very myths of Dune, into the time of the Great Revolt, more commonly known as the Butlerian Jihad.
The terrible war against thinking machines was the genesis of our political-commercial universe. Hear now, as I tell the story of free humans rebelling against the domination of robots, computers, and cymeks. Observe the basis of the great betrayal that made mortal enemies of House Atreides and House Harkonnen, a violent feud that continues to this day. Learn the roots of the Bene Gesserit Sisterhood, the Spacing Guild and their Navigators, the Swordmasters of Ginaz, the Suk Medical School, the Mentats. Witness the lives of oppressed Zensunni Wanderers who fled to the desert world of Arrakis, where they became our greatest soldiers, the Fremen.
Such events led to the birth and life of Muad'Dib.
* * *
LONG BEFORE MUAD'DIB, in the last days of the Old Empire, humanity lost its drive. Terran civilization had spread across the stars, but grew stagnant. With few ambitions, most people allowed efficient machines to perform everyday tasks for them. Gradually, humans ceased to think, or dream…or truly live.
Then came a man from the distant Thalim system, a visionary who took the name of Tlaloc after an ancient god of rain. He spoke to languid crowds, attempting to revive their human spirit, to no apparent effect. But a few misfits heard Tlaloc's message.
These new thinkers met in secret and discussed how they would change the Empire, if only they could overthrow the foolish rulers. Discarding their birth names, they assumed appellations associated with great gods and heroes. Foremost among them were General Agamemnon and his lover Juno, a tactical genius. These two recruited the programming expert Barbarossa, who devised a scheme to convert the Empire's ubiquitous servile machines into fearless aggressors by giving their AI brains certain human characteristics, including the ambition to conquer. Then several more humans joined the ambitious rebels. In all, twenty masterminds formed the core of a revolutionary movement that took over the Old Empire.
Victorious, they called themselves Titans, after the most ancient of Greek gods. Led by the visionary Tlaloc, the twenty allocated the administration of planets and peoples among themselves, enforcing their edicts through Barbarossa's aggressive thinking machines. They conquered most of the known galaxy.
Some resistance groups rallied their defenses on the fringes of the Old Empire. Forming their own confederation--the League of Nobles--they fought the Twenty Titans and, after many bloody battles, retained their freedom. They stopped the tide of the Titans and drove them back.
Tlaloc vowed to dominate these outsiders one day, but after less than a decade in power, the visionary leader was killed in a tragic accident. General Agamemnon took Tlaloc's place as leader, but the death of his friend and mentor was a grim reminder of the Titans' own mortality.
Wishing to rule for centuries, Agamemnon and his lover Juno undertook a risky course of action. They had their brains surgically removed and implanted in preservation canisters that could be installed into a variety of mechanical bodies. One by one--as the remaining Titans felt the specter of age and vulnerability--all of the others also converted themselves into "cymeks," machines with human minds.
The Time of Titans lasted for a century. The cymek usurpers ruled their various planets, using increasingly sophisticated computers and robots to maintain order. But one fateful day the hedonistic Titan Xerxes, anxious to have more time for his pleasures, surrendered too much access to his pervasive AI network.
The sentient computer network seized control of an entire planet, followed quickly by others. The breakdown spread like a virulent infestation from world to world, and the computer "evermind" grew in power and scope. Naming itself Omnius, the intelligent and adaptible network conquered all the Titan-controlled planets before the cymeks had time to warn each other of the danger.
Omnius then set out to establish and maintain order in its own highly structured fashion, keeping the humiliated cymeks under its thumb. Once masters of an empire, Agamemnon and his companions became reluctant servants to the widespread evermind.
At the time of the Butlerian Jihad, Omnius and his thinking machines had held all of the "Synchronized Worlds" in an iron grip for a thousand years.
Even so, clusters of free humans remained on the outskirts, bound together for mutual protection, thorns in the sides of the thinking machines. Whenever attacks came, the League of Nobles defended themselves effectively.
But new machine plans were always being developed.

Copyright © 2002 by Herbert Limited Partnership
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Read More Show Less

Interviews & Essays

Inventing History for Dune
When Frank Herbert first created the Dune universe almost four decades ago, he placed his story on a canvas that spanned more than 20,000 years. A masterpiece of world building and history, Dune is richly detailed, full of characters and cultures, clearly giving the impression that the author knows much more than he's letting on.

One of the most tantalizing events mentioned in all six of Frank Herbert's Dune novels is the Butlerian Jihad, a titanic conflict of humans against thinking machines, which serves as the genesis for many of the familiar ingredients in Dune. This fascinating part of Dune history is the single event most hotly anticipated by Frank Herbert fans.

After completing three immediate prequels to Dune -- House Atreides, House Harkonnen, and House Corrino -- we reawakened the fervor for Frank Herbert's grand history. Many readers have returned to the original novels, and new fans have picked up the books. Our first prequel trilogy features all familiar characters and events, leading directly into Dune.

For The Butlerian Jihad, we had to travel back 10,000 years before the events in the original story. This posed a difficult, but entertaining, challenge -- to create an original universe, building our own characters and events, yet one that captures the flavor and essence of Dune.

Armed with Frank Herbert's unpublished notes and background material, we had some important clues to the events of the Butlerian Jihad, but none of the extensive details. Building on this material, The Butlerian Jihad answers the most vital questions fans have been asking: the circumstances behind the great betrayal that made mortal enemies of House Atreides and House Harkonnen, the foundations of the Bene Gesserit Sisterhood, as well as the creation of the Order of Mentats, the Suk doctors, the Swordmasters of Ginaz, and the Spacing Guild. We also show the dramatic struggle of the oppressed Zensunni Wanderers who escape their bondage and flee to an uncharted desert world, where they settle among the spice and sandworms and declare themselves "Free men" of Dune. Readers will recognize some familiar names and meet new friends and enemies.

Because The Butlerian Jihad is so far removed from the original classic novel, we felt we had a greater freedom but also a greater responsibility. We are opening a new chapter in this grand history, yet it must be familiar enough to belong beside the other Dune novels. We created a new set of characters that we found remarkable in their own right -- the half-machine tyrant Agamemnon and his brainwashed son Vorian Atreides, the dedicated free human Xavier Harkonnen, the genius scientist Tio Holtzman, and of course the incomparable heroine, Serena Butler. The independent robot Erasmus -- whom Publishers Weekly calls "a Thinking Machine Hannibal Lecter with whimsical Mr. Spock-ish meditations" -- is probably the best villain either of us has ever concocted. The Butlerian Jihad is just the first of a projected trilogy. Frank Herbert has left us a vast landscape to explore, but at least we have a map. We still have a lot more history to create. Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 81 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(31)

4 Star

(29)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(9)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 81 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2014

    Great read

    I could not put this book down. A great introduction to the Dune universe.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 15, 2014

    The prequel that explains the origins of many of Dune's mysteries

    Entertaining story behind the mysterious concepts that form the original Dune. It is well written and I found myself making time to read it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2014

    Great

    As a new comer to the Duniverse, I decided to travel through it chronological. Although I'm 201% sure that this comes nowhere near the fansty that the late Frank Herbert wrote, I still found it a fun and exciting tale of the 11,000 year off future, and I will countinue to journy throughout it. A*

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2013

    Good

    I love anything by these authors, nd frank, I live in the dune universe everytime I feel the pages on my fingertips (or touchscreen) lol..

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 10, 2012

    The Book & The Service

    The Butlerian Jihad is, as I knew it would be a fantastic work of science fiction which transcends its genre. Once again Brian Herbert & Kevin J Anderson prove themselves worthy inheritors of the legacy of Frank Herbert.

    I would also like to Give my thanks and commend Barnes & Noble Books for their fantastic service. When I lived in my home town of New York City there was always a particular joy in my visits to any of the local B&N branches, and now that I live abroad I continue to enjoy the courtesy and effectiveness of their on-line

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2004

    To Many Pages for Kids Book

    I did enjoy some of the previous books by Anderson and Herbert before they teamed up with Koontz, Clancy and their ilk. This book should be about 10 pages with colorful graphics. Then maybe I could finish reading it. I would recommend getting it from the library if your that interested.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2012

    Bro

    Me too

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2012

    Oh thank u

    I am soo bored, with nuthin to do.... that stuff that their doin in the other result is just gross....

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2012

    Dune series

    I have read the entire series in the order they were written over the years. Now i am re-READING in chronological order and i can say that i appreciate the additions to the original series much more. This book is packed full of adventure and really adds a nice foundation to the entire series

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 9, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I think it stinks that Barnes and Noble mixed in reviews from th

    I think it stinks that Barnes and Noble mixed in reviews from the classic Frank Herbert's Dune in with reviews of Brian's, The Butlerian Jihad, in order to bring up the rating of this abominable book. Brian Herbert couldn't pass a college level essay course. If his father wasn't Frank Herbert, there's not one publisher that would give him the time of day. This book is terrible even with Kevin Anderson contributing to it.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2011

    Great Book

    Was disappointed to end the book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 11, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Highly Recommended A Must Read!

    Perhaps the best book of the Legends of Dune trilogy. It was my favorite of the three novels. 'The Butlerian Jihad' sets up the story of how Arrakis will eventually become the center of the universe. It shows us the beginnings of the Sisterhood prior to the Dune Chronicles. One of my favorite characters by far of the entire trilogy Norma Cenva's spectacular contribution to humanity with the gift of space folding technology is told in length. Without introduction, (perhaps Kevin J. Anderson & Brian Herbert will write a book about the beginnings of the Titan cymeks,) the Titan cymeks are a very interesting instance in Dune history that will slowly and eventually develop into the beginnings of the rivalries between House Atriedes, House Harkonnen, and House Corrino. Also, humanity's war for freedom against the thinking machines is one of several hypocritical elements that are not ignored throughout the saga. The possession of slaves, by those planets that slavery is legal, is rationalized with the argument that they are indebted to do their part in the war against Omnius. No one human is allowed to be neutral, having no part in the war. Erasmus is an A.I. machine that is all his own. His individuality, actions, and thoughts are childish, horrific, and entertainingly funny. I would most definitely recommend reading this trilogy before you continue the saga with Dune 7, 'Hunters of Dune' and 'Sandworms of Dune', which wrap-up the story from Frank Herbert's 'Heretics of Dune' and 'Chapterhouse Dune'.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2007

    A reviewer

    Ok I have always been a huge fan of Frank Herberts main series so i thought i would enjoy this. It is nice to get a few more answers and a bit more color added to the storyline. It is not a bad story at all actually if it werent for the god awfull and insulting presentation. This book is written at a 6th grade reading level and removes a good level of the philosophizing i enjoyed in the other books, and replaces it with mindless pointless action. if i wanted action id go see a movie. I want to think when i read. If you are a dune fan its a nice little read. If your not stear clear of this.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2007

    Erasimus is not Mr. Spock!

    The book was ok and granted I have been spoiled by Frank Herberts elaborate epic storytelling, but I could have done without the robot who wants to understand humans(better to compare him to a sadistic Mr. Data then to Spock). Unfortunatly Erasimus is crucial to the storyline. Points in favor for the story are that we get to see the beginnings of house Atreides and of the frendship between Vorian Atreides and Xaviar Harkonnen that begin the sequence of events leading to the betrayal and downfall of house Harkonnen. Also, many other new beginnings such as the Bene Gesserit. Points against the book: Most of Frank Herberts loyal fans have college reading skills and are downright insulted by how often a summary of what happened before is given. If we took out all the repeat information and the reminders of what happened last the book would be half the size! Overall I would say the book is worth reading for the background and the answers given to all those questions we have had about humanity's origins. However do not expect the depth of plot and intricate, interwoven character development and interaction that you have enjoyed in Frank Herberts books.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2005

    i know i know, i've only read 208 pages

    C'mon people,,, I've read 208 pages of this book and what do you expect ? if you've read the origional Dune novels this book should please you, you should know what is coming to a certain extent.. but in 208 pages of this first book in this series, it already has a dramatis persone that should turn out to be VERY interesting when it begins to weave.. at least, they are building up to it i believe. Very pleased in the novel so far,, although it seems to be written in more of a 'fantasy' style compared to the Origional Dune Chronicals.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2004

    Good in spite of most critic's opinions

    This book is an entertaining read that tells us about the origins of Frank Herbert's expansive universe, introduces interesting new characters and concepts, and delves into the concept that I have seen written in every single dune novel, which is 'history is always written by the winners.' We learn that the characters in the original dune novels were misinformed in many areas. I won't spoil it for those who want to read this, and leave out details. On a final note, to those who have spoken negatively of this book, of course it's not as good as the original trilogy. Only a simpleton would expect it to be. In my opinion, most people who give negative reviews to continuations of old series like Dune, are small- and close-minded and unwilling to accept anything but what they have deemed 'the right way' to write. Cut Brian and Kevin a break, stop wishing they were as good as Frank, and just enjoy a well thought out piece of work.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2004

    Best Book they have written

    The Butlerian Jihad is a remarkable book that approaches the sheer genious and excellence of the original Dune by Frank Herbert. This is the finest book yet by these two authors to date.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2004

    IF you like Dune then you will love these

    This book brings new light to the past and how the Dune universe came to be. Anyone looking for a way to pass some time that doesnt reguire batteries or a remote should look into all of Frank and his son Brian's master piece.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2003

    Answering many questions

    Brian and Kevin ignore your critics!!! This book takes a controversial view of the 'actual' events behind the history written in the original Dune novels. This is often the case in reality. Just because history is written, doesn't mean it is true. So Tio Holzman STOLE credit for the holzman generator, SO WHAT!!! Leto is the decendent of a Cymek who kept his sperm in a bank, SO WHAT!!! This book is a great read. The author's will have to apologize with the human race for not letting EVERYONE write this story for them. If everything was ROSY than there wouldn't be much point in the story, would there?? Many GREAT heroes are born from adversity and so is the case with Paul in the original books. If you want a bed of roses read a romance, here in the SCIFI world, I have to say that this is an awesome book. Many questions have been answered and many more questions asked. I will be reading the rest of this trilogy!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2003

    Terrible

    The Butlerian Jihad is, by far, one of the worst books I've ever read. To say that the characters are one-dimensional is to ascribe to them one more dimension than they deserve. The book is extremely redundant, simplistic, and spends far too much time exploring the worn out relationship between the unfeeling robots and the creative and emotional humans that has plagued every last piece of bad science fiction out there. The entire book is really Star Wars/Trek-ish. Vorian Atreides' rapport with his robot (or should I say 'droid'?) companion is mind-numbing and could have come straight from any Star Wars movie. Serena's dialogues with Erasmus could have been lifted verbatim from those insipid Data/Pulaski conversations in TNG. The back cover promises 'the amazing tale of the Zensunni Wanderers, who escape bondage to flee to the desert world where they will declare themselves the Free Men of Dune,' but fails to deliver on that promise. If you haven't read this book yet, save yourself the trouble and leave the story of the Jihad up to your imagination.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 81 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)