Dungeons & Dragons: 4th Edition Core Rulebook Gift Set

Overview

All three 4th Edition core rulebooks in one handsome slipcase.

The Dungeons & Dragons Roleplaying Game has defined the medieval fantasy genre and the tabletop RPG industry for more than 30 years. In the D&D game, players create characters that band together to explore dungeons, slay monsters, and find treasure. The 4th Edition D&D rules offer the best possible play experience by presenting exciting character options, an elegant and ...

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Seller since 2010

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(2390)

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0786950633 This item is brand new. Please allow 4 - 14 business days for Standard shipping, within the US. Thank you for supporting our small, family-owned business!

Ships from: ACWORTH, GA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

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  • International
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Overview

All three 4th Edition core rulebooks in one handsome slipcase.

The Dungeons & Dragons Roleplaying Game has defined the medieval fantasy genre and the tabletop RPG industry for more than 30 years. In the D&D game, players create characters that band together to explore dungeons, slay monsters, and find treasure. The 4th Edition D&D rules offer the best possible play experience by presenting exciting character options, an elegant and robust rules system, and handy storytelling tools for the Dungeon Master.

This gift set provides all three 4th Edition Dungeons & Dragons core rulebooks (Player's Handbook, Dungeon Master's Guide, and Monster Manual) in a handsome slipcase that looks great on any bookshelf.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786950638
  • Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
  • Publication date: 6/6/2008
  • Series: D&D Core Rulebook Series
  • Edition description: Box
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 832
  • Product dimensions: 8.70 (w) x 11.60 (h) x 2.40 (d)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 17, 2008

    This is the game that brought me back into tabletop gaming.

    For long time DnD fans a new edition can bring about strong emotions. 4th edtion is no exception. This edtion of DnD is the most radical change in the history of the game. It is more of a ground up rebuild than a refinement or update. Altough it sticks to the fundamentals of DnD, such as the classic six stats, level and class based play, and a d20 core mechanic, much is new, and much has changed. In my opinion, most of these changes are for the better.<BR/><BR/>A major goal of 4th edition was to adress balance issues between the classes, and I think for the most part it is a success in this area. All classes are usefull, all have something to contribute on a round to round basis during an encounter. Also, perhaps the biggest change from previous editions, all classes have powers. For the tradtional caster classes these are spells, but the melee classes have powers as well, based on special combat training and exploits. This makes sure the Rogue or Fighter has as many neat tricks as the Wizard, which is a change I greatly approve of.<BR/><BR/>Looking at the specific books included in the core rules, we have the traditional breakdown: Player's Handbook, Dungeon Master's Guide, Monster Manual.<BR/><BR/>The Player's Handbook includes all the basic rules for races and classes, character creation, combat, and now includes the magic item information, which in earlier version of the game was typcially included in the Dungeon Master's Guide. Read this first, and read it several times. <BR/><BR/>The 4th Edition Dungeon Master's Guide is perhaps the most useful version of the DMG that we have ever had. It contains much practical advice about running the game, and also excellent and easy to use rules for encounter and enemy design. Dungeon Master prep is vastly simpler compaired to the 3.x ed versions of the game. <BR/><BR/>The Monster Manual provides about 500 enemies of all power levels. Monster design has taked a major step forward in 4th edition. Even low level enemies are more dynamic and interesting than in pervious editions. Combats are, in general, more tactical and varied than pervious editions. This edtion is less about your character build and more about what you do with your build once you get to the table, another change I greatly approve.<BR/><BR/>My only real complaint about this edition is that the rules are silent on anything that doens't take place in the "dungeon", using that term in the broadest possible sense. The skill system is greatly simplified. In may ways, I like that change (did we really need seperate listen and spot skills?), but non-adventuring skills are abscent. If you want to model a character who is a expert crafter, or a skilled merchant, or for that matter anything other than a wandering tomb robber, your only tools are a handfull of very broadly defined social and knowledge skills. For a player who enjoys a more simulationist game, this is going to chafe. <BR/><BR/>In summary, 4th edition is an excellent game, focusing on cinimatic action and rules light role playing. Hard core simulationist players will likely find it lacking, but for those who enjoy an action oriented fantasy game this one is great fun once you actually get it over the table.

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2008

    Don't listen to the slack it's getting, it is genuinely a great game!

    If you've never played D&D before then I'll make this review significantly shorter for you. Buy 4th Edition it's designed for newcomers. Plain and simple. Now, for all those skeptical about the new version. Yes, it's easier, sure there isn't a rule for everything, and it's true there are less available classes but the better things far outweigh the minor setbacks. The nice thing about it being easier is that even the most incompetent of players would have no trouble reading and understanding the rules and even learning to DM is easier. The game focuses less on the NPCs and monsters and lets the players do all the cool stuff. Why do you need a profession skill? So NPCs make money and you take up time rolling how much everyone makes? How about it doesn't matter so we'll scrap that. They also made combat easier to understand. Can you recite how to grapple in v3.5? If you can that's good but do you ever do it? Didn't think so. In 4th they fixed it along with other combat maneuvers. Better yet, they balanced classes much better this time around while still having them be absolutely unique to their own purpose. No more spells per day, a wizard can cast magic missile every last turn if they want to, a fighter can actually tank now by causing the enemy to take penalties to attacks for not focusing on them, rogues can hit the enemy and then position them for combat advantage, and clerics aren't the only healers, anyone can heal now. I really can't do the new version justice but I am telling you now that 4th edition is absolutely the greatest D&D experience yet. Besides, they're not making anymore 3.5 material, I'd get going on 4th now especially if you're like me and you play at RPGA conventions. Or, don't play. You can sit with your 3.5e books and 4-page character sheets pausing the game every 5 minutes to look up a monster feat or roll for profession checks, or look up how to bull rush, or something like that while the rest of the world enjoys a fast paced, easy to manage, genius RPG.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2008

    Worst Edition of the Game To Date

    If you're a longtime fan of Dungeons & Dragons, this isn't the game for you. Much of the game's rich history and iconic elements have been sacrificed in an effort to simplify the game to attract new gamers. The game is far less flexible than 3rd Edition. Character classes are loaded with gonzo powers and forced into tighter niches than ever before. Multiclassing is nearly non-existant. Classic races that have been with the game from the beginning have been jettisoned to make room for bland, flavorless new ones like the dragonborn. Many of the iconic monsters have been drastically altered to fit into a new, unnecessary cosmology and core setting. Succubi are now devils, despite always being demons, and demons as a whole are now related to elementals. Angels are no longer exemplars of good. This is just the tip of the iceberg. Most of the iconic monsters have had their abilities stripped down to just a handful of powers, and nearly all non-combat abilities are gone. The names of many of the new creatures and variants are bland. The flavor text is nearly nonexistant. Monsters can only improve in a few cookie-cutter roles, such as 'skirmisher', rather than truly advanced to become better at what makes them unique. Worst of all, many iconic monsters (for example, frost giants) have been left out of the first Monster Manual and reserved for later books. With all the focus on per-encounter abilities, 'controllers' and 'strikers', bosses and minions, and 'marking' opponents, it feels more like an MMORPG like World of Warcraft than a good ol' pen-and-paper RPG. If you're a fan of the past editions of the game, save your money and wait until next year for Paizo's Pathfinder RPG, which looks more like the heir apparent to the D&D throne.

    7 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2008

    Don't fear change

    A lot of fans of the older editions are extremly unsatisfied with the new 4th edition books. While it isn't perfect and there certainly are some spots that the game's rules are lacking in, it's nothing that can't be worked around by a creative set of players. If you're new to the game, this is a great place to start and while it's not as deep as 3.5, it's also easier to play. The newer players will have less trouble catching on and have more fun. Some complain that it's just a replica of an online RPG, but it's not. It's up to the party to keep it from being monotonous, not just the rules. Try out 4th edition, there's no better place to start. Different isn't already bad. Try out the edition and put aside the bias for a short while. You just might have fun.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2008

    No D&D edition is utterly flawless, including this one.

    The more I read about this heated debate between the two camps of thought concerning the development and distribution of the latest rule set for the world¿s most recognized pen-and-pencil role-playing game, the more I just wish the argument would come to a conclusion. On one hand, I don't blame 4th Edition critics for being upset with some of the changes made to their favorite tabletop RPG, but I still think their judgment of D&D¿s latest incarnation is pretty harsh in certain respects. Then again, anyone who thinks of 3e (either 3.0 or 3.5) as ¿the evil that killed Dungeons & Dragons¿ or otherwise outrageously inferior to this new rules system seriously needs to spare the rest of us their hatred and get over their apparent need to retaliate vehemently against 4e¿s detractors. The way I see it, both sides of this story carry a grain of truth in them. On one hand, the mechanics in this edition are simpler so that newcomers and casual gamers alike can easily grasp them and feel more at ease playing the game. Likewise, 4e still uses a few features from 3e¿s d20 system--saves, AC rules, character attributes, and the like--so as to make campaign conversions from 3e rules to 4e rules less of a hassle than most critics might otherwise think. However, while role-playing and character interaction IS possible in spite of 4e¿s unmistakable preoccupation with combat, the depth of the former isn¿t really covered all that much, and it¿s up to the DM and his/her players to incorporate such substance into their own play sessions. Moreover, the ¿Rituals¿ that wizards and clerics can cast come from the exact same list, which really prevents a lot of the versatility that made earlier editions of D&D so time-honored. Likewise, even though characters gaining At-Will, Encounter, and Daily Powers at the same select levels helps in a way to promote balance between the classes, it also homogenizes them and makes one class seem all too similar to another at times (e.g., the Warlock in respect to the Wizard or the Fighter in respect to the Paladin). On the whole, Dungeons & Dragons 4th Edition is still very much playable, but it nonetheless has enough flaws to bring about legitimate complaints. In short, I sincerely think there¿s plenty of refinement needed before 4e can hope to attain even half the glory that earlier editions have received. On that note, let¿s all give these newer rules a chance, and hopefully in the next couple of years, they¿ll evolve into something really special. In the meantime, though, fellow gamers, no more bickering¿please¿

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2008

    The Best Edition of D&D Yet

    None of the elements that made sitting down and playing D&D with your friends such an enjoyable experience have been lost in the switch to 4th Edition. The game now flows better, is easier to pick up, is more fun to play (and run, for you DMs out there!) and has me genuinely excited for the future of the role-playing game. Yes, there are some out there who can't stomach a change to something they've grown accustomed to, even if that change is for the better. But please don't let yourself be one of these. Give 4th Edition a shot - sit down and roll some dice with friends. I guarantee you that by the end of the night you'll swear that this is the best thing to happen to Dungeons & Dragons, ever.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2008

    Different, but not bad at all

    The claims about non-combat powers being gone are vastly overstated. 4th Edition is the first edition to offer solid, playable, rules for non-combat encounters, XP awards for same, and so on. Other editions had guidelines some people might figure out and use 4E offers good design advice for making them work, and concrete numbers. Overall, yes, this is a bit streamlined, and in some ways probably newbie-friendly. As someone who's been playing D&D for about 25 years, I think this is absolutely going to be my favorite edition to play. Like every edition, it will need some house rules to make it fit my mood and play style. This will, by far, be the easiest edition to write balanced rules for. If you've been afraid that D&D would be too hard to learn, or you've been overwhelmed by the complexity of previous editions, or the reliance on 'well, everyone KNOWS you need to have this mix of classes' things, try 4th Edition. It may work for you.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2008

    A reviewer

    I was one of the first to pre-order, and I immediately got a group together to test this out and figure out the Mechanics. It's a bit complicated starting out, as the rules have obviously changed a bit. WotC made certain to explain a number of rules in great depth, then just glossed over several, such as the fact that the only mention of Utility Powers is a single Side note, and whatever you can glean from the Power Descriptions.

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    Posted September 1, 2009

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