Overview

"Every country (if she’s lucky) gets the Mark Twain she deserves, and Winkler is ours, bristling with savage Jamaican wit, heart-stopping compassion, and jaw-dropping humor all at once."—Marlon James, author of John Crow’s Devil

With his characteristic outrageousness, Anthony C. Winkler defies taboos and subverts conventional thinking in this entertaining, thought-provoking, and ultimately uplifting novel.

Anthony C. Winkler was born in ...

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The Duppy

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Overview

"Every country (if she’s lucky) gets the Mark Twain she deserves, and Winkler is ours, bristling with savage Jamaican wit, heart-stopping compassion, and jaw-dropping humor all at once."—Marlon James, author of John Crow’s Devil

With his characteristic outrageousness, Anthony C. Winkler defies taboos and subverts conventional thinking in this entertaining, thought-provoking, and ultimately uplifting novel.

Anthony C. Winkler was born in Kingston, Jamaica, in 1942, and is widely recognized as one of the island’s finest and most hilarious exports. His Caribbean classic The Lunatic (Akashic Books) was turned into a feature film, and his last novel, Dog War, was published in May 2007 by Akashic. He lives with his wife in Atlanta, Georgia.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Jamaican-born novelist Winkler recounts the journey of Taddeus Augustus Baps, a 47-year old Jamaican man who becomes a "duppy," or spirit, after he dies. Shocked by his unexpected death, Baps discovers he's unable to touch anything earthly and quickly surmises his new status will enable him to "overhear scandal and rumor, eavesdrop on backbiting and tale-telling" and witness men "grind" on their housekeepers. But before Baps can have any fun, a deceased thief arrives to escort him to heaven, where nothing measures up to Baps's expectations, especially the minibus-not chariot-trip to the Promised Land. Once in heaven, Baps meets Miss B, a country general store proprietress who takes him as her lover until she's called to another duty. After her departure, a perennially cranky Baps takes control of her shop and struggles to get the other heavenly villagers to respect him. In addition, Baps befriends God, bickers with a conflicted American philosopher and travels in an effort to expand his otherworldly horizons. Winkler (Dog War) earns a lot of chuckles as he pokes fun at cultural stereotypes and the afterlife. (Mar.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

One Saturday morning, Jamaican shopkeeper Baps dies. He watches in horror as his maid and gardener empty the money from his pockets and then discovers that he has to catch a minibus. The bus takes him to a culvert, and when he crawls through, he is in Heaven. Heaven is not what you think, however; in fact, it is a lot like the Jamaica he just left except that you get whatever you want. Soon he meets a woman who runs a shop, and they spend the afternoon having sex. Helping to run the shop, Baps is disturbed to find that they don't charge for merchandise in Heaven and decides to set some prices; people have no problem paying because there is a money tree out back. Finally, Baps meets God and takes a trip to American Heaven, which is quite different from Jamaican Heaven; the people there are upset that there is no hell and have been after God to create one. Winkler (The Lunatic) uses a Jamaican accent to turn Dante's Paradiso on its head. Although there is not much depth here, the comic and philosophical narrative is stimulating, and the critique of religion is brought to a clever and positive resolution. Recommended.
—Joshua Cohen

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781617750489
  • Publisher: Akashic Books
  • Publication date: 3/1/2008
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 175
  • File size: 639 KB

Meet the Author

Winkler was born in Kingston, Jamaica, in 1942. His first novel, The Painted Canoe, was published in 1984 to critical acclaim. This was followed by The Lunatic (1987), The Great Yacht Race (1992), Going Home to Teach (1995) and The Duppy (1997). A short story collection, The Annihilation of Fish and Other Stories, was published in 2004 by Macmillan.
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2000

    God as a Peeniwallie

    Americans may view Jamaica as paradise - but Jamaicans view the US as the promised land. Life is easy, the horn of pleanty abounds - no dutty johncrows to deal with. In this book, our hero dies at the beginning and is taken to heaven. But heaven is divided into nation states and cultures. God is a wanted deity in the US heaven for not punishing sinners. Our hero meets and makes friends with God, who has taken haven in the Jamaican heaven in the shape of a peeniwallie (or lightning bug), and travels with him around heaven and the universe. On the face of it, in this book Anthony Winkler - a Jamaican professor based in a US university - writes about a Jamaican's ideal heaven. This heaven is much like Jamaica, but with a free and easy life style - devoid of any of the Christian hang-ups which otherwise prevent Jamaicans from procreating and enjoying themselves to the fullest. But just as intriguing is the American heaven he portrays, with puritanical angels, harps, clouds and sheep. But in this short, hysterical book there are many truths hidden along with an intriguing philosophy on the meaning of life, God and the creation of man. This book is for anyone from Jamaica, any American with a self-depreciating sense of humour, anyone who has difficulty being religous in an age of reason and anyone who likes to laugh their socks off. I've read three of Anthony's books so far - but this is the best. It captures the essence of Jamaicans and their inherent conflict of religiousness vs. bachaanal. I can't wait for his next book....

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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