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Dusk and Summer

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Dashboard Confessional have earned a reputation and throngs of fans for the kind of spirited, sincere emo-rock that makes yearbook prose come to life. But after years playing the ultimate acoustic warrior, frontman Chris Carrabba plugs in big-time on Dusk and Summer, a disc that finds him exploring his usual heart-on-sleeve topics, with a bit more brawn palpable in the muscles beneath that sleeve. Always capable of crafting an irresistible sing-along, Carrabba goes one step further here, turning his contagious melodies into out-and-out arena-rock anthems -- like "The Secret's in the Telling" and the soaring "Reason to Believe" -- that are powered by chiming leads and ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
Dashboard Confessional have earned a reputation and throngs of fans for the kind of spirited, sincere emo-rock that makes yearbook prose come to life. But after years playing the ultimate acoustic warrior, frontman Chris Carrabba plugs in big-time on Dusk and Summer, a disc that finds him exploring his usual heart-on-sleeve topics, with a bit more brawn palpable in the muscles beneath that sleeve. Always capable of crafting an irresistible sing-along, Carrabba goes one step further here, turning his contagious melodies into out-and-out arena-rock anthems -- like "The Secret's in the Telling" and the soaring "Reason to Believe" -- that are powered by chiming leads and heady guitar arpeggios. At times, as on the spacious "Don't Wait," the new attitude brings Carrabba to the brink of U2 territory -- not entirely surprising, since producer Daniel Lanois has frequently worked with the Irish megastars -- but the singer almost always manages to retain his identity. The one exception is "So Long, So Long," a piano ballad on which Carrabba cedes a bit too much ground to duet partner Adam Duritz of Counting Crows, who drives the tune down the very middle of the soccer-mom road. Aside from that misstep, however, Carrabba manages to make his decision to "go electric" seem positively electrifying -- an affirmation that sometimes bigger is indeed better.
All Music Guide - Corey Apar
Dusk and Summer -- a cohesive album divergent from the modern-rock collection of songs on 2003's A Mark, a Brand, a Mission, a Scar -- finds Dashboard Confessional's path to maturity leading them, weirdly enough, back to their roots. Whether or not this is a reaction to mainstream success, Dashboard is still very much a full band, but the album is gentler and falls much closer to the feeling of The Places You Have Come to Fear the Most. Not only does it include more tracks with simpler arrangements that occasionally now include piano and violin, the general sonic vibe resembles more of its earlier work, just more seasoned. Though the lead track and single, "Don't Wait," has one of the most grating choruses on the album -- and the song also owns a weird underlying air of "Kiss Me" by Sixpence None the Richer -- the remainder of the suitably titled Dusk and Summer is very much full of satisfying heartfelt anthems that reflect its early evening beach artwork. Chris Carrabba's lyrical touchstone is again dominated by relationships, but that invigorating first date from 2003's "Hands Down" must have really taken off, since broken-heart brooding only appears sparingly. The gentle "Stolen" is a beautifully sincere song where the repeated "You have stolen my heart" is so tenderly spoken, it's like Carrabba is taking care to not wake his sweetheart sleeping beside him. Leaving one's hometown is delicately reflected upon in the piano-tinged "So Long, So Long," where Counting Crows' Adam Duritz provides wonderful guest vocals, while the band proves it can rock out in tracks like "Reason to Believe" and "Rooftops and Invitations." And damn if "Slow Decay" isn't the dirtiest, darkest song Dashboard Confessional has written to date "Heaven Here" might have been a contender with its trashy percussion, but the song quickly goes soft and remains a muddled mess that never quite gets worked out. Dashboard Confessional may have been embraced by the masses with the ├╝ber-success of Spider-Man 2's "Vindicated," but Dusk and Summer doesn't care about that. It's an album from a matured Carrabba now in his early thirties directly to his grassroots fan base. He may have grown beyond six-strings and a wooden stool, but when the result is this good, who can really complain?
Billboard - Sven Philipp
Slower paced and more atmospheric than any of its predecessors, "Dusk" is an ambitious showcase of maturity.

Slower paced and more atmospheric than any of its predecessors, "Dusk" is an ambitious showcase of maturity.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 6/27/2006
  • Label: Vagrant Records
  • UPC: 602498893401
  • Catalog Number: 000606102

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Don't Wait (4:05)
  2. 2 Reason to Believe (3:43)
  3. 3 The Secret's in the Telling (3:24)
  4. 4 Stolen (3:53)
  5. 5 Rooftops and Invitations (3:54)
  6. 6 So Long, So Long (4:15)
  7. 7 Currents (4:27)
  8. 8 Slow Decay (4:08)
  9. 9 Dusk and Summer (4:38)
  10. 10 Heaven Here (4:08)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Dashboard Confessional Primary Artist
Adam Duritz Vocals
Mike Marsh Percussion, Drums
Scott Schoenbeck Bass, Bass Guitar
Chris Carrabba Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals
John Lefler Guitar, Keyboards
Susan Sherouse Violin, Vocals
Technical Credits
Don Gilmore Producer, Audio Production
Ted Jensen Mastering
Daniel Lanois Producer, Vocal Producer
John O'Mahoney Digital Editing
Daniel Mendez Engineer
Ben Patterson Executive Producer
Mark Kiczula Engineer
Chris Carrabba Composer
Fox Phelps Engineer
Rich Egan Management
Gary Copeland Producer
Amanda Hayward Producer
Tim Pechmann Executive Producer
Jon Marc Sandifer Executive Producer
Adam Samuels Engineer
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 22, 2012

    <3 Dashboard Confessional

    &lt;3 Dashboard Confessional

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    DC Shows Depth and Vitality on Fourth Album

    “Dusk and Summer” provides Dashboard Confessional with a new lease on life on their fourth hit album. While some internet chat compares them to U2, they set their own tone and redefine themselves. The first track, “Don’t Wait”, lyrically encourages enjoyment of life. Part of the chorus, “lay your armor down” describes the band’s direction with the album and is medium paced with excellent vocals and a great mix of guitars. Starting strong, the album packs an early punch rocking with power chords. “Breathe” would be a better title for the song “Reason to Believe.” In this, Carrabba, lead vocalist, mentions his resolve on a track full of life. There is a change of pace from the first two tracks to an appealing song for all punk funs. In it, Carrabba sings “tonight might be the last chance we are given” in a song about making the most of the moment, specifically with a friend or lover. Carrabba’s voice is multi-dimensional across the sound board never making for a dull moment on the album. “Stolen”, one of the slowest tracks, brings slow electrics to a ballad. Read the full review at punkpressonline.com along with other great reviews, news, and interviews from bands across the spectrum.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Nobody here can live forever, quiet in the grasp of dusk and summer.

    Dusk and Summer, a slightly cliché title, labels the latest CD by Christopher Ender Carrabba and band. Though a little less pop-y that his last endeavor, A Mark A Mission A Brand A Scar, Dusk and Summer still has that more hip feel than his old classics such as Places You Have Come To Fear The Most. Carrabba is known for his interesting lyrics with a strong vocabulary, as well as his acoustic guitar- each of which certainly appear more in this album than the last. The first song, Don't Wait, is already released with a video. It's not his strongest song- but it's easily sellable. It speaks out to the mainstream, but still has that Dashboard taint to it. The second and third tracks, Reason to Believe and The Secret's in the Telling, are both fine songs on their own, with a more modern rock feel compared to Carrabba's previous acoustic dealings, but when juxtaposed next to each other, they seem to blend into one long song. Stolen, the fourth track, has a reccuring cliché phrase- "you have stolen my heart." Though it sounds corny, Carrabba's voice and the rest of the song manages to pull it off with grace. Rooftops and Invitations, the fifth track, opens up with a pizzazz that makes you want to drive around, windows down, with music blared- very enjoyable. The sixth track, which includes piano, is So Long So Long, which many Dashboard fans have already heard, so it's a familiar track for many. Slow and endearing, it's a nice intro for the other vocalists in the band as they start to use more harmonies. Track seven, Currents, is a little corny, but sounds genuine coming from Carrabba, and it's very agreeable. Slow Decay has a great bass rift in the intro, and the lyrics, vocals, and meaning really hits back to the old Dashboard that we know and love. Dusk and Summer, despite its already stated cliché name, is acoustic and easy to fall in love with, simply put... it's very old-school Dashboard style. The last track, Heaven Here,didn't catch my ear the first listen through. Upon multiple listenings, however, it starts to grow on you. Overall, though the CD still has some traces of mainstream influence and more AMAMABAS traits than Carrabba's earlier works, Dusk and Summer is a strong album that came out just in time. It's great to listen to while blasting out your stereo speakers, screaming along as you drive with your windows down- I suggest you all try it at least once. It touches back to its roots, though the progress from the one man show to the full-band sound is still obvious. I'd suggest buying it at your earliest convenience- but if you're a new Dashboard fan, I'd encourage buying some of his old albums along with it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Great for Summer

    I'm a die hard Dashboard Confessional fan: the know every song by heart and wait for 7 hours to be in the front row type. And so, like most DC fans, I was very nervous about this album as it had been pushed back after Chris scrapped all of his original songs (So Long, So Long survived- thank God.) and his last album was my least favorite of all those he's released (I like Dusk and Summer over A Mark, A Mission, A Brand, A Scar) Anyway- I like early DC best (So Impossible EP is what got me hooked in the first place.), but I feel that Dusk and Summer has its place: it's the type of music that you want to be with someone you care about on a hot summer night. It's fun and relatable: in other words? A strong album that most fans- even if they aren't completely blown over will at least respect. And as for critics dismissing Chris's angsty and syrupy lyrics? I can see their point, but people relate to them and while they may be trite at times, Chris gives them meaning. His voice sends shivers down your back. My biggest dissapointment in the album is what many others have mentioned: a similarity to Bono who DC toured with. It seems almost like a transfer... and while it's not necessarily a bad thing, it doesn't sound as original. Well- there's my two bit! :)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    It's Dashboard, but not as you know them

    So, not taking into account the single "Vindicated", this is the first proper studio release from Dashboard Confessional since the million-selling "A Mark, A Mission, A Brand, A Scar"". That album itself divided a lot of DC fans - some liked the newer, electric direction, whilst some pined for the older acoustic style. So does this new record go back to these earlier routes, or continue along the new-found harder-edged sound? Well, a little bit of both. The opening track, and first single, "Don't Wait", is an uplifting melodic track that continues where "Vindicated" left off. With soaring vocals (both main and backing) and trademark lyrics from Chris Carabba, this is the song that will convert new fans to the DC sound. This is followed by "Reason To Believe", which opens with a searing guitar riff that wouldn't be out of place on a Van Halen-type song. Yet further proof that Chris is moving away from the acoustic stuff that won so many fans over. "The Secret's In The Telling" is a strange one. One of the new songs that DC has debuted at their recent live shows, this was originally thought by fans to be called "Awake", and was much slower with really beautiful harmonies. Here, it's at a higher tempo, and I'm not sure it's better for it. But, the lyrics are pure DC - "your name is pounding through my brain, can't you hear how it is sung" amongst many highlights. Next track, "Stolen", opens with a gentle lilting drum/guitar trade, and is the first song that drops the pace a little. This could easily be the next single, as it has the perfect mix of radio-friendly melody and still appeal to the "rock" masses. It also features some of the best singing I've yet heard from Chris. This leads into "Rooftops And Invitations", which sounds like a hybrid of U2 and Dashboard (the band toured with U2 last year and you can see some influence here). Whether it's because you can hear this influence or not, I just feel this is probably the weakest track on the album. There's been a lot of interest in the next song on the album, "So Long, So Long", due to the fact that here, Chris duets with Adam Durritz of Counting Crows fame - and to beautiful effect. A piano-led track, the trading between Chris and Adam gives us one of the standout tracks of the album, with possibly one of the most melodious songs recorded by DC, along with really touching lyrics - "..how the girls can turn to ghosts before your eyes..". Definitely single contender. This is followed by "Currents", another slow-tempo song. Led in by trademark DC guitar work, this is probably the track that older DC fans will relate to most. Almost like a pseudo-sequel to "Several Million Ways To Die Trying" from the previous album, it's a slow burning track that just builds and builds, with beautiful floating harmonies behind an impressive vocal performance from Chris, and is my personal favourite from the album. "Slow Decay" picks the pace up again, with a thumping bass line behind the main track. It's probably one of the heaviest songs Chris has done, and should be a good live song. The title track itself, "Dusk And Summer", is definitely old-school Dashboard, with a gentle acoustic performance and heartfelt lyrics that we've come to expect from Chris - ".. and she said nobody can lie here forever, quiet in the grass, of dusk and summer". It's a bittersweet love song, supplemented beautifully by violin, and the most gentle track on the album. The closing track, "Heaven Here", opens with a drum intro and just Chris singing over keyboards, before an almost-psychedelic sitar feel takes the song into an uplifting melody that grows and grows, before closing with Chris imploring "..so let it last all night, so let it last all night", over and over, until the tra

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    Posted December 1, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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