300: Rise of an Empire

( 2 )

Overview

Greek general Themistokles Sullivan Stapleton assembles his troops to fend off an invading Persian army led by the immortal Xerxes Rodrigo Santoro and the vindictive Persian navy commander Artemisia Eva Green in this sequel to 300 based on the graphic novel Xerses by Frank Miller. In the wake of the Persians' victory over King Leonidas and his 300 Spartans, the God King Xerxes Santoro appears poised to conquer Greece. As the ruthless Artemisia Eva Green assembles a massive fleet of ships and sets sail for ...
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Overview

Greek general Themistokles Sullivan Stapleton assembles his troops to fend off an invading Persian army led by the immortal Xerxes Rodrigo Santoro and the vindictive Persian navy commander Artemisia Eva Green in this sequel to 300 based on the graphic novel Xerses by Frank Miller. In the wake of the Persians' victory over King Leonidas and his 300 Spartans, the God King Xerxes Santoro appears poised to conquer Greece. As the ruthless Artemisia Eva Green assembles a massive fleet of ships and sets sail for conquest, Greek general Themistokles Sullivan Stapleton strives to rally his countrymen to fight for freedom, and he manages to gain the upper hand over the invaders by confronting them at sea. Meanwhile, Leonidas' former advisor and wife Queen Gorgo Lena Headey is reluctant to sacrifice any more Spartans in a fight that appears to be unwinnable. When the Greeks enjoy an early victory over Artemisia and her soldiers, however, it appears that Themistokles' unconventional tactics are more effective than the Persian Empire's formidable brawn. But later, after Artemisia's attempt to seduce Themistokles to her side proves unsuccessful, the spurned naval commander deals a devastating blow to her Greek opponents. In the aftermath of that skirmish, Themistokles is presumed dead and Athens falls. The Persian Empire seems on the verge of victory, though when Xerxes and Artemisia learn that Themistokles lives, they realize the fight won't be over until he takes his final breath.
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Special Features

Discover how the historic battles of 300 and 300: Rise of an Empire converged to create 3 days in Hell! Bringing the war machine to the water in Taking the Battle To Sea Meet the military geniuses and vengeful queens who changed history in Real Leaders & Legends and Women Warriors Witness the physical, mental and performance challenges of Becoming a Warrior
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Jason Buchanan
If 300: Rise of an Empire isn't irrefutable proof that the MPAA is hopelessly biased and broken, then may Zack Snyder be forced to eat King Leonidas' bloodstained sandals off of his cold, dead feet. An artfully crafted piece of comic-book propaganda, director Noam Murro's sequel to Snyder's stylized historical hit may well be the bloodiest spectacle ever released into mainstream theaters. From the vivid POV decapitation that opens the film to the screaming charge that closes it, 300: Rise of an Empire subjects us to a relentless barrage of stabbings, slashings, impalements, beheadings, and skull splittings -- frequently in a single scene -- that are only occasionally interrupted by exposition or macho, fist-pumping speeches intended to inspire the battle-scarred Greeks to victory. Likewise, with all of the testosterone-fueled braggadocio about Greek nobility, justice, and vengeance versus Persian cruelty and oppression, not to mention the film's portrayal of what may be history's very first suicide bombing, there's no escaping the nagging thought that 300: Rise of an Empire is a jingositc bid to whip draft-age males into a frenzy of freedom-loving bloodlust -- a suspicion that isn't helped by the fact that more bodies are dismembered in one sequence of this movie than in the entire Friday the 13th series (which frequently suffered the wrath of MPAA snipping throughout the conservative 1980s) and yet it managed to squeak by with an R rating. The story here is a simple one: In the wake of the Persians' victory over King Leonidas and his 300 Spartans, the God King Xerxes (Rodrigo Santoro) appears poised to conquer Greece. As vindictive Persian navy commander Artemisia (Eva Green) assembles a massive fleet of ships and sets sail for conquest, Greek general Themistokles (Sullivan Stapleton) strives to rally his countrymen to fight for freedom, and he manages to gain the upper hand over the invaders by confronting them at sea. Meanwhile, Leonidas' former advisor and wife Queen Gorgo (Lena Headey) is reluctant to sacrifice any more Spartans in a fight that appears to be unwinnable. When the Greeks enjoy an early victory over Artemisia and her soldiers, however, it appears that Themistokles' unconventional tactics are more effective than the Persian Empire's formidable brawn. But later, after Artemisia's attempt to seduce Themistokles to her side proves unsuccessful, the spurned naval commander deals a devastating blow to her Greek opponents. In the aftermath of that skirmish, Themistokles is presumed dead and Athens falls. The Persian Empire seems on the verge of victory, though when Xerxes and Artemisia learn that Themistokles lives, they realize the fight won't be over until he takes his final breath. Regardless of how you feel about the politics of 300: Rise of an Empire, one has to admit that director Murro has done an exceptional job of recreating the distinctive look and feel of Snyder's previous film. From the hyper-saturated colors to the lucidly rendered battle sequences, viewers could almost be fooled into thinking that Snyder had returned to the helm here, if not for the eye-popping closing credits. Even if he was too busy reinventing Superman to be lurking over Murro's shoulders, Snyder still managed to leave a distinctive mark on the production as co-screenwriter (along with Kurt Johnstad) and producer. Also, given the film's overt theme of nationalism, few will find it surprising that original comic-book creator Frank Miller has returned in executive-producer capacity as well. To their credit and Murro's, 300: Rise of an Empire retains the aesthetics of the original movie like few other sequels in history -- an impressive feat considering the seven-year gap that separates them. Despite his relative lack of experience in the genre, Murro stages action scenes with a competent eye here as Snyder and Johnstad's flimsy screenplay drives the plot forward. Though their efforts are appropriately aided by a cast whose epic posturing is only exceeded by their commendable green-screen acting abilities, the historical figures are still painted in childishly broad strokes. Outside of his majestic costuming, Santoro offers practically no indication of just what it was about Xerxes that inspired such fierce devotion among his soldiers, and while Eva Green occasionally evokes the sensual malevolence of Barbara Steele, her character comes off more as the world's worst boss than the Persian Empire's most brilliant tactician. The fact that revenge drives the story line of virtually every character in 300: Rise of an Empire would make the movie hopelessly dull if it weren't for the "strong sustained sequences of stylized bloody violence throughout," not to mention "a sex scene" that may be the most hilariously hateful one ever filmed. Additionally, Australian television star Stapleton, despite his best efforts, never summons the intensity that Gerard Butler so effortlessly exuded in the previous film. As a result, we long to root for Themistokles' men as underdogs, even though his cries to action never stir us on the same visceral level as Butler's bellowing of "THIS IS SPARTA!" But that isn't likely to matter much in the end, because chances are good that young men will still flock to the theaters in droves, where their judgment will be blinded by the geysers of blood spewing forth from the screen in glorious 3D. Meanwhile, when the credits roll, they'll pour out into the parking lot itching for a fight, and perhaps be inspired to finally approach those recruiters who've been turning up at their schools, encouraging them to "Go Army."
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 6/24/2014
  • UPC: 883929256969
  • Original Release: 2014
  • Rating:

  • Source: Warner Home Video
  • Region Code: 1
  • Presentation: Bonus DVD
  • Time: 1:43:00
  • Format: Blu-ray
  • Sales rank: 2,599

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Sullivan Stapleton Themistokles
Eva Green Artemisia
Lena Headey Gorgo
Hans Matheson Aeskylos;, Aeskylos
Rodrigo Santoro Xerxes
David Wenham Dilios
Andrew Tiernan Ephialtes
Andrew Pleavin Daxos
Callan Mulvey Scyllias
Jack O'Connell Calisto
Igal Naor Persian King Darius
Peter Mensah Persian Emissary
Ben Turner General Artaphernes
Ashraf Barhom General Bandari
Christopher Sciueref General Kashani
Steven Cree Decapitated Greek Marine
Caitlin Carmichael 8 Year Old Artemisia
Kevin Fry Lascivious Greek
Kevin Fry-Bowers Lascivious Greek
David Sterne Old Statesman
Clive Leviev-Sawyer Senator
Christopher Boyer Senator
Fred Ochs Senator
Price Carson Senator
John Michael Herndon Senator
David Pevsner Senator
Dimo Alexandrov Alexiev Rope Puller
Peter Ferdinando Greek Ambassador
Gregor Truter Small Ambassador
Vincent Walsh Naval Commander
Nick Court Theban Commander
Mark Killeen Greek Commander
Anthony Valentine Young Greek Soldier
Alexander Nikolov Dimitrov Greek Marine
Atanas Srebrev Blacksmith
Luke Roberts Butcher
George Georgiou Greek Citizen
Stefan Nikolaev Ivanov Persian Commander
Farshad Farahat Persian Officer
Daniel Rashev Persian General 1
Dimitar Martinov Persian General 2
Technical Credits
Noam Murro Director
Anton Bakarski Camera Operator
Lucy Bevan Casting
David Brenner Editor
Alexandra Byrne Costumes/Costume Designer
Mark Canton Producer
David Chow Set Decoration/Design
Wesley Coller Co-producer
Paul Deely Special Effects
Valentin Dimitrov Production Manager
Simon Duggan Cinematographer
Jeff Elliott Special Effects
Glenn Evans Special Effects
Joe Farrell Art Director
Nikolay Fartunkov Special Effects
Craig Flores Executive Producer
Mark Frazier Associate Producer
Fractured FX Makeup Special Effects
Alex García Co-producer
Bernie Goldmann Producer
Matthew Hall Special Effects
Claas Henke Art Director
Jon Jashni Executive Producer
Daniel R. Jennings Set Decoration/Design
Kurt Johnstad Screenwriter
Stephen Jones Executive Producer
Alexey Karagiaur Art Director
Mark Koivu Special Effects
Tammy Lee Set Decoration/Design
Richard Mays Set Decoration/Design
Peter McCaffrey Camera Operator
Frank Miller Executive Producer
Eric A. Norris Sound/Sound Designer
Gianni Nunnari Producer
Tom Ozanich Sound/Sound Designer
Philip A. Patterson Asst. Director
Roee Sharon Peled Co-producer
George Perez Associate Producer
Darren M. Poe Art Director
Anshuman Prasad Set Decoration/Design
Justin Raleigh Makeup Special Effects
Sonya Savova Art Director
Lorenzo Senatore Cinematographer
Wyatt Smith Editor
Deborah Snyder Producer
Zack Snyder Producer, Screenwriter
Patrick Tatopoulos Production Designer
Thomas Tull Executive Producer
Ivan Vatzov Camera Operator
Randy D. Wilkins Set Decoration/Design
Junkie XL Score Composer
Yordan Yordanov Special Effects
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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- 300: Rise of an Empire
1. Chapter 1 [10:25]
2. Chapter 2 [10:27]
3. Chapter 3 [10:20]
4. Chapter 4 [9:42]
5. Chapter 5 [9:51]
6. Chapter 6 [1:18]
7. Chapter 7 [7:56]
8. Chapter 8 [9:45]
9. Chapter 9 [9:58]
10. Chapter 10 [11:15]
11. Chapter 11 [2:49]
12. Chapter 12 [8:37]
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Menu

Disc #1 -- 300: Rise of an Empire
   Play
   Scene Selections
   Languages
      Audio
         English
         Français
         Español
      Subtitles
         English Subtitles (For The Deaf And Hard Of Hearing): On
         Français Subtitles: On
         Español Subtitles: On
         Subtitles: Off
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 14, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    I love the way this sequel overlaps with the original, in both s

    I love the way this sequel overlaps with the original, in both story and characters. Poetic License for sure, with the true history, but that is not good enough a reason to complain. Every few years the CGI multiplies in resolution and number of elements, and on my 75 inch watched at 10 feet, the realism is breathtaking. I have one of those friends who yelps and jumps up and down when the battles explode, and other violent evens happen, and he was on the edge of his seat all the way through. I had to try hard to ignore him, since beheadings of The Bad Buys are not to be missed. Now I wonder what will happen when I watch this again alone. It will be my turn to cheer. And I am happy with the gorgeous women NOT looking like muscle-bound weight-room freaks. If we wanted to see Reality, we could put in a disc from The Great Courses. These actors do well enough for me, especially in the slam-every-surface sex. The Triumph of Democracy has not looked so perfect since the original 300. Bravo!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2014

    Great follow- up to 300. The only criticism I can proffer here

    Great follow- up to 300. The only criticism I can proffer here is that 110 lb women like Lena Headey and Eva Green are not gonna mix it up with jacked up Immortals and Spartans/Athenians and come out in one piece. They should have hit the weight room before filming started Ahhh Wooooo!!

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews