×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

500 Years Later
     

500 Years Later

3.2 4
Director: Owen Alik Shahadah, Molefi Kete Asante, Maulana Karenga, Trevor Marshall

Cast: Owen Alik Shahadah, Molefi Kete Asante, Maulana Karenga, Trevor Marshall

 
In an effort to encourage children and leaders to work towards a more stable future for generations to come, filmmaker Owen Alik Shahadah explores the history of atrocities which resulted when, 500 years ago, countless Africans were forced to migrate from their continent. Interviews with such notable figures as cultural activist Dr. Maulana Karenga, Hidden History<

Overview

In an effort to encourage children and leaders to work towards a more stable future for generations to come, filmmaker Owen Alik Shahadah explores the history of atrocities which resulted when, 500 years ago, countless Africans were forced to migrate from their continent. Interviews with such notable figures as cultural activist Dr. Maulana Karenga, Hidden History author Andrew Muhammad, writer Dr. Francis Wesling, and Dr. Molefi K. Asante, the father of Afrocentricity, and interviews with everyday laypeople are inter-cut to offer telling insight into the conflicts brought about by racial inequalities. Accompanying these interviews are a broad spectrum of images from the beaches of Barbados to the streets of London and the cities of the United States, as well as a haunting score by composer Tunde Jegede.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/08/2008
UPC:
0883476001210
Original Release:
2005
Rating:
NR
Source:
Code Black Ent
Region Code:
1
Time:
1:56:00
Sales rank:
37,965

Special Features

African Slavery by Dr. Kimani Nehusi; Tukufu Suberi interview - How Many

Related Subjects

Cast & Crew

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- 500 Years Later
1. Opening Credits [8:08]
2. The Gun Trade [10:08]
3. Legacy [8:26]
4. Racism [8:59]
5. Generations [7:44]
6. Identity [10:54]
7. Education [8:43]
8. Mission Schools [7:45]
9. Reparations [8:32]
10. Changes [12:14]
11. Sankofa [6:46]
12. End Credits [7:37]

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

500 Years Later 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think this is an ok documentory to watch and learn about what the African people went through. I think it was terrible how they were treated and how they are still treated today. How would white people feel if it had been the other way around? I'm white. Sometimes wish I were black so I could truely understand their pain. One day it will all be over. Thanks be to God our savior.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Our brave and hearty ancestors walked down the long dusty dangerous roads of the South after the Civil War, for the most part uneducated,dead broke, with no legal rights or protection, with enemies at every turn. They chose life. They did not despair, they did not allow their enemies to define them or to dictate to them a world view. They defined themselves and created strong stable communities that allowed us to come into being....if our enslaved African  ancestors had the philosophy of endless victimhood of this documentary they would have curled up and died in the woods. None of us would be here!! The video puts forth a cowardly pusillanimous  chump-like &quot;negro&quot; response to American bigotry and oppression. The spirit of a Martin R. Delany or a Malcolm X or a Nat Turner or a Paul Robeson or a Martin Luther King never ever makes an appereance.  The tone of this documentary was one of hopelessness and despair. Only rarely did a fleeting positive perspective manage to rise above the noise of long dreary antedotes and self-deprecating opinions. In the background, sad and melodramatic sounds of violins (European style) only added to the sense of depression and gloom. According to this documentary, our history starts and ends with the horrors of slavery-not with the ancient Egypto-Nubian cultures along the mighty Nile.  At times, one would think they were watching a typical 5:30 evening news telling us of the &quot;crises in the inner city&quot;. Bill Cosby even spewed out his criticism of African people in America more than once. Babies out of wedlock. Jail populations; you have heard it all before!! We all know that Bill Cosby remains silent when he has a chance to criticize the racism and bigotry in American culture. Bill Cosby's remarks only creates more problems for this flimsy effort. I was on the verge of turning off the DVD player when I saw a picture of several of Diop's books. Maybe an informative interview with some new presenters, maybe this will mark a shift in tone and outlook. Maybe Paul Robeson Jr. would speak about his father . Maybe Maulana Karenga will talk about Ifa or Maat, or maybe Asante will offer helpful insights from the works of Diop or Obenga..maybe somebody would explain the concept of Ori of the Yoruba or Chi of the Ibo...? Maybe Dr. Obenga would be interviewed.....Maybe someboby would rise out of the mire and speak boldly and confidently in the spirit of Diop or Garvey or Malcolm. I waited only to be dissapointed when the long line of dreary presenters ,from various parts of the world, started all over again: &quot;we need to do this....or that&quot;... One obscure musician with a British accent and a sad and depressed look on his face, managed to mumble something about&quot;other people&quot; do this why can't black people..... This transatlantic PITY PARTY went on and on and on with a seemingly endless number of depressing observations and whining opinions. They simply repeated again and again  all the negative themes used by the West in their attempt to demoralize African people. They all seem to have been chosen for the severity of their depression or the complexity of their neurosis. Most of them seemed dead on a cultural, spiritual and intellectual level. Perhaps they had one foot in and one foot out of the Euro-centric intellectual paradigm and thats enough to depress and confuse anybody!!!They appeared to have been shattered psychologically by the Euro-centric intellectual tyranny that dominates academia in the United States and Europe. Did they want the Western world to validate their opinions? They seemed troubled and trying to convince themselves that they really believed or even understood the works of Obenga and Diop. Finally it was over. And a pensive and weary looking Dr. Molefi Asante appeared on screen and uttered with force and conviction an almost Diopian closing statement, but it was far too little and far too late to save this long, sorry, dreary film. May I have my money back please!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago