A Clockwork Orange

( 37 )

Overview

Stanley Kubrick dissects the nature of violence in this darkly ironic, near-future satire, adapted from Anthony Burgess's novel, complete with "Nadsat" slang. Classical music-loving proto-punk Alex Malcolm McDowell and his "Droogs" spend their nights getting high at the Korova Milkbar before embarking on "a little of the old ultraviolence," such as terrorizing a writer, Mr. Alexander Patrick Magee, and gang raping his wife who later dies as a result. After Alex is jailed for bludgeoning the Cat Lady Miriam Karlin...
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Overview

Stanley Kubrick dissects the nature of violence in this darkly ironic, near-future satire, adapted from Anthony Burgess's novel, complete with "Nadsat" slang. Classical music-loving proto-punk Alex Malcolm McDowell and his "Droogs" spend their nights getting high at the Korova Milkbar before embarking on "a little of the old ultraviolence," such as terrorizing a writer, Mr. Alexander Patrick Magee, and gang raping his wife who later dies as a result. After Alex is jailed for bludgeoning the Cat Lady Miriam Karlin to death with one of her phallic sculptures, Alex submits to the Ludovico behavior modification technique to earn his freedom; he's conditioned to abhor violence through watching gory movies, and even his adored Beethoven is turned against him. Returned to the world defenseless, Alex becomes the victim of his prior victims, with Mr. Alexander using Beethoven's "Ninth" to inflict the greatest pain of all. When society sees what the state has done to Alex, however, the politically expedient move is made. Casting a coldly pessimistic view on the then-future of the late '70s-early '80s, Kubrick and production designer John Barry created a world of high-tech cultural decay, mixing old details like bowler hats with bizarrely alienating "new" environments like the Milkbar. Alex's violence is horrific, yet it is an aesthetically calculated fact of his existence; his charisma makes the icily clinical Ludovico treatment seem more negatively abusive than positively therapeutic. Alex may be a sadist, but the state's autocratic control is another violent act, rather than a solution. Released in late 1971 within weeks of Sam Peckinpah's brutally violent Straw Dogs, the film sparked considerable controversy in the U.S. with its X-rated violence; after copycat crimes in England, Kubrick withdrew the film from British distribution until after his death. Opinion was divided on the meaning of Kubrick's detached view of this shocking future, but, whether the discord drew the curious or Kubrick's scathing diagnosis spoke to the chaotic cultural moment, A Clockwork Orange became a hit. On the heels of New York Film Critics Circle awards as Best Film, Best Director, and Best Screenplay, Kubrick received Oscar nominations in all three categories.
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Special Features

Disc 1: ; Commentary by Malcolm McDowell and historian Nick Redman; Theatrical trailer; Languages: English & Français; Subtitles: English, Français, & Español; (Main feature. Bonus material/trailer may not be subtitled).; ; Disc 2: ; Channel Four documentary Still Tickin': The Return of Clockwork Orange; New featurette Great Bolshy Yarblockos!: Making A Clockwork Orange; Career profile O Lucky Malcolm! produced/directed by Jan Harlan, edited by Katia de Vidas
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Mark Deming
After the visionary journey through space and time of 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick offered a very different look at the future (which seemed uncomfortably close to the present) in A Clockwork Orange. But if one has to compare A Clockwork Orange to any of Kubrick's other films, it comes closest to Dr. Strangelove: for all its horrific violence and troubling moral ambiguity, it is ultimately a satire, and, like Dr. Strangelove, it wrings a shocking amount of humor from situations that few people would think of as funny. With the notable exception of Alex (Malcolm McDowell in the best performance of his career), most of the characters are little more than cartoons (with dialogue to match), while a great deal of the violence walks a fine line between Looney Tunes absurdity and crushingly vivid brutality. Kubrick's future state is often garish and ugly, veering between an amusingly hideous riot of color and texture gone wrong and the decaying remnants of a cinder-block nation (remarkably, Kubrick and production designer John Barry built only one set for the entire film, with everything else shot on existing locations that were dressed in "futuristic" style). And Kubrick throws in plenty of crude comic relief that suggests some degenerate variation on a Carry On film; from the overexcited school representative to the doctor and nurse enjoying recreational sex as Alex regains consciousness, Kubrick places his grim vision in an England where foolish absurdity is the order of the day. And while Alex seems one of the few characters capable of making a complex moral choice (never mind how sinister his choices happen to be), he also takes his choice more seriously than anyone else in the film. Alex has adopted violent hedonism not out of profit, politics, or pragmatism, but because he likes it, and, while this makes him difficult to admire, he's still the smartest and freest man in the film's moral universe.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 10/23/2007
  • UPC: 012569806726
  • Original Release: 1971
  • Rating:

  • Source: Warner Home Video
  • Region Code: 1
  • Presentation: Remastered / Special Edition / Wide Screen
  • Sound: Dolby AC-3 Surround Sound
  • Language: Français
  • Time: 2:17:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 9,973

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Malcolm McDowell Alex
Patrick Magee Mr. Frank Alexander
Michael Bates Chief Guard
Adrienne Corri Mrs. Alexander
Warren Clarke Dim
Aubrey Morris P.R. Deltoid
Steven Berkoff Constable
Gaye Brown
Peter Burton
Lindsay Campbell Inspector
Vivienne Chandler Handmaiden
Carol Drinkwater Nurse Feeley
Lee Fox
Gillian Hills Sonietta
Barbara Scott Marty
Virginia Wetherell Stage Actress
Neil Wilson
Katya Wyeth Girl
James Marcus Georgie
John Carney C.I.D. Official
John Clive Stage Actor
Carl Duering Dr. Brodsky
Paul Farrell Tramp
Clive Francis Lodger
Michael Gover Prison Governor
Miriam Karlin Cat Lady
Godfrey Quigley Prison Chaplain
Sheila Raynor Mum
Madge Ryan Dr. Branum
John Savident Conspirator
Anthony Sharp Minister
Philip Stone Dad
Pauline Taylor Psychiatrist
Margaret Tyzack Conspirator
David Prowse Julian
Richard Connaught
Jan Adair
Barrie Cookson
Prudence Drage
Cheryl Grunwald Rape Victim
Craig Hunter Dr. Friendly
Shirley Jaffe
Michael Tarn Pete
Technical Credits
Stanley Kubrick Director, Producer, Screenwriter
John Alcott Cinematographer
John Barry Production Designer
Bill Butler Editor
Milena Canonero Costumes/Costume Designer
Wendy Carlos Score Composer
Derek Cracknell Asst. Director
Barbara Daly Makeup
Dusty Symonds Asst. Director
Russell Hagg Art Director
John Jordan Sound/Sound Designer
Si Litvinoff Executive Producer
George Partleton Makeup
Max Raab Executive Producer
Roy Scammell Stunts
Peter Shields Art Director
Bernard Williams Associate Producer
Freddie Williamson Makeup
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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- A Clockwork Orange: Feature Presentation
1. Alex and His Droogs [2:15]
2. The Old Ultraviolence on a Tramp [2:10]
3. Battling Billy Boy [3:04]
4. Through the Real Country Dark [1:26]
5. Country House [4:23]
6. Disciplining Dim [3:24]
7. At Home With Ludwig Van [3:15]
8. Home Ill; Mr. Deltoid [5:45]
9. The Music Shop [2:17]
10. Two Ladies [:58]
11. Dissent Among Droogs [4:14]
12. A Real Leader [3:11]
13. The Cat Lady's House [7:01]
14. Now a Murderer [3:48]
15. Prisoner #655321 [5:35]
16. The Chaplain's Remarks [2:33]
17. Big Book Fantasies [5:48]
18. The Minister's Visit [6:00]
19. Arrival at Ludovico [3:53]
20. "And Vidi Films I Would." [4:19]
21. "I'm Cured. Praise God!" [3:42]
22. On Display [4:44]
23. The Sickness [2:17]
24. Your True Christian [1:50]
25. Family Reunion [3:44]
26. No Room for Alex [4:01]
27. Three Familiar Faces [3:35]
28. Droogs With Badges [2:52]
29. Return to the Country House [7:12]
30. Mr. Alexander's Hospitality [11:33]
31. The Hospital [2:53]
32. A Slide Show [3:34]
33. A Very Special Visitor [4:56]
34. "I Was Cured, All Right." [1:22]
35. End Credits [2:40]
Disc #2 -- A Clockwork Orange: Special Features
1. Opening Montage [2:49]
2. Come on, Come On [4:11]
3. If.... [5:35]
4. A Clockwork Orange [7:40]
5. Weird Effect [8:14]
6. O Lucky Man! [7:11]
7. Caligula [1:58]
8. Time After Time [5:20]
9. McDowell Generations [5:46]
10. Gangster No. I, Between Strangers [6:12]
11. I'll Sleep When I'm Dead [5:20]
12. Diabolical Storyteller [4:56]
13. The Company [3:19]
14. Red Roses and Petrol [4:08]
15. As Great As Film Acting Gets [1:52]
16. Evilenko [8:05]
17. Summing up; End Credits [3:21]
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Menu

Disc #1 -- A Clockwork Orange: Feature Presentation
   Play Movie
   Scene Selections
   Special Features
      Commentary by Malcolm McDowell and Nick Redman
      Theatrical Trailer
   Languages
      Spoken Languages: English 5.1
      Spoken Languages: Français 5.1
      Subtitles: English (For the Hearing Impaired)
      Subtitles: Français
      Subtitles: Off
Disc #2 -- A Clockwork Orange: Special Features
   Still Tickin': The Return of A Clockwork Orange
   Great Bolshy Yarblockos! Making A Clockwork Orange
   O Lucky Malcolm!
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 37 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(29)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(2)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 37 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 6, 2011

    a colt classic, and a must see !

    I heard of the notorious film, but decided to read Burgess's novel first, and although I observed that it could have probably been better adapted to the book, for example the complete omission of the symbolic twenty-first chapter. It was an amazing film, well shot, and Mcdowell acted very well, also raw and gritty, like the book, the film will be an iconic piece of work, as will the novel, a must read and a must see, in that order

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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A Clockwork Orange: the Movie is a very Odd Duck

    I read the book first and they kept the movie on task with the book fairly well. It was like trying to learn a new language and was very strange, though the point that they were trying to make could be useful in todays society if it was understandable. A classic...I didn't really think so. Very Odd...to be for sure.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    The Good Old Days

    A Clockwork Orange is Definitely a Cult Classic. It has been one of my favorite movies of all time and having it on Blu-Ray makes it even more intense. Malcolm McDonald has certainly outdid himself with this movie, but for some, this movie may become a little too intense. The audio and visual becomes more alive on Blu-Ray then on regular DVD. I love how Blu-Ray brings the movie alive through both visual and audio and the extra material on the disc is a definite bonus. I am in the Baby-Boomer Generation and this movie is a Must Have movie.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Unique, Brilliant and Narrated

    The extremely violent gang lead by an ultra aggressive "alpha dog" who, in contrast, is the good boy at home with Mom and Dad and is a Beethoven fan, self destructs. I was fascinated by the inventive slang and "uniforms," but perhaps the biggest thing for me is that it is narrated. Maybe I don't like to think too much, or I like to be literally told a story. Narrated movies have an advantage with me. My favorite movie is "Little Big Man." Despite the evil main character with no redeeming qualities except perhaps his love of Beethoven's music, I really like this movie. It is like a strange, debased, but poetic dream.

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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Welly well.

    I believe that A Clockwork Orange has a lot of things in common with our present day world. Such violent acts exist whether you want to believe it or not. Kubrick does not exceed the depiction of these happenings, he mearly shows just enough to keem major plot points enbedded in your head. To not watch the Kubrick's movies simply because you don't want to have to decipher it because of it's shock value is completely up to you, but all and all this is a well put together movie. Sides, it's not like the bible didn't have graphic scenes throughout.

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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Brightly Painted Hooker

    "A Clockwork Orange" is one of the most lyrically beautiful, ritualistically brutal films ever made. The violence can be so off-putting that you feel compelled to turn away from the screen, but the sheer beauty of Kubrick's stylized barbarism makes it impossible to look away.<BR/><BR/>The visual poetry of the film is entrancing. The premise is fascinating: that a quasi-Hobbesian futuristic society attempts to cure a nihilistic cutthroat thug (Alex) by treating him like a Pavlov dog. The rights of the individual are subjugated to the rights of the state. The film presents us with the horns of a dilemma: do we sympathize with a bloodthirsty punk like Alex, or with a cold-blooded omnipotent state that employs the methods of stimulus-response behaviorism to brainwash its individuals to conform in the name of the group?<BR/><BR/>All in all, "A Clockwork Orange" comes off as emotionally bankrupt (like the society it lampoons), and therefore, emotionally uninvolving and devoid of passion, all gussied up like a brightly painted hooker, like Alex himself, for that matter, tricked out in his meretricious, eye-catching costumes.<BR/><BR/>--Bryan Cassiday, author of "Fete of Death"

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    AVERSION-THERAPY WORKS!

    The thing that astounds me the most about this movie is the staggering volume of different interpretations it's generated over the years from fans and critics trying to understand Kubrick's message. The man is genius at creating moods and using a deftly-choreographed interplay between memorable music, atypical dialogue and highly-visceral images to evoke powerful emotions from his audience members. In the end though, I wonder if it's not just his capacity to captivate that leaves us wanting to find a meaning to his madness. In other words, aren't we all just grasping for understanding when we've had our sentimentalities stretched to the maximum? Why did I sit through this? Why did the director feel the need to inflict those images and sounds on my psyche? Will I ever be able to eat spaghetti and listen to classical music again? The commonality between all Kubrick apologists is that it's all fair game because, hey, it's art. Fair enough. But while I'm willing to pay money for entertainment, I like to get my philosophy for free. So without trying to evaluate whether or not Kubrick is justified in marketing a movie of such torturous imagery because of some loosely-grasped meaning or ideology that only a few elite film critics and sociology grads are priviledged enough to understand, I will say that this movie takes advantage of its audience. And if that's not enough reason to dislike it, I'm afraid it has made it impossible for me to ever again hear Singin' in the Rain without wanting to vomit.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    What the deuce is the point?

    I had no idea what the plot of this movie was. It was confusing from minute one and only led me into more confusion. I grew weary of the language of the main character, because I never knew what he was talking about. It was also very boring.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Raw and wicked. Stanley Kubrick's take on the mind and macabre

    I've never read the book, but I bet many others have not either, though I had read a lot of reviews about `A Clockwork Orange' before seeing it, basically because I was unable to see it. Alex de Large(Malcolm McDowell) is the leader of four droogs who steel, rape, and fight for pleasure in a futuristic society. They spend every minute of their spare time causing absolute chaos anywhere they please. But after being challenged for his leadership, Alex puts his own droogs in their place by beating them. Wanting revenge for Alex's betrayal, the gang betrays Alex and leaves him for the police by whom he is told that he will be prosecuted for murder. Alex is sentenced for 14 years in prison, but after a while with good behavior, he is given the opportunity to get out early through an experiment that reforms criminals through brainwashing to be perfect citizens. Now, a totally reformed Alex must go back and face the society that he once terrorized as a human being with no free will. What amazed me most about this movie was the classical music that was played throughout horrific violent acts that Alex committed, showing that his violence was in nature. The music assisted the idea that he was a criminal at heart and he doesn't want to change. With the movie originally being rated X, you can probably guess that the criminal acts are very graphic. But that it was makes the movie even more brilliant. It doesn't hesitate to show the viewers every aspect of brutal fight scenes or disgusting rape visuals. Every detail adds to the idea that he is a sinner, plain and simple. The acting was also great in here. Malcolm McDowell did a masterful job at his character's changes throughout the movie. The mood changes throughout the movie also. When Alex is "allowed" to be sinister, the mood is dark but yet happy. But when he is forced to be good (either in prison or after the reformation) the mood turns very dark and you can see Alex's unhappiness at what he has become. The movie shows very strong opinionated themes: Society cannot forgive other's sins and criminals are naturally evil and cannot be reformed. Disagree with this you may, but you have to respect the epic masterpiece that is A Clockwork Orange. Overall, the movie is completely flawless and is everything it was meant to be and more. The idea of a criminal being transformed into being the idol citizen was captured rather nicely, through the graphic genius of Stanley Kubrick. I highly recommend this movie.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Kubrick's deep visual style strikes again

    There were times in this movie that really made me sick, scenes of violence, sex, or rape.I tried to think why Kubrick put those scenes in at all, but the answer is simple, Kubrick needed those scenes to get the audience to understand Alex's dark emotions. This movie first came out with an X-rating, but after all these years they pulled it down to an R-rating, does it deserve an R-rating, yes. This movie does have a lot of nudity, but it is not used as nudity, it is used as art.Kubrick paints a vivid picture of England's grim future in this unsettling satire, which boasts wit, drama, 'romance', and beautiful scenes.This is one of Kubrick's best, and it should be watched for ages to come.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Most movies Don't even compare to this

    This is what makes this movie so interesting. For the fact it is different than any common movie you see out there. The strangeness, the poetry, the characters, but most of all...the story. In order to really understand it, watch it a few times. Stanley Kubrick made this to entertain movie buffs, and it did more than that.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Greatest movie ever

    I love this movie so much I bought the poster and put it in my living room. This is the best andie mcdowell movie and his last one before her change. This and the Duplex are my favortie Stanley Kubric movies. Its unfortunate that he was assinated after his wife had a miscarriage.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Unlike any piece of sinny I've ever viddied before.

    This film is like, real horrorshow. It'll give ya a nice feeling all through your guttiwutts, like ya just peeted a chasha of the ol' knifey moloko. But may I suggest, my little droogies, that you itty on down to the biblio, and viddy the novel as well. You won't soon forget it. I do think it's the best piece of sinny ever, what with all the tolchoking ultra-violence, and the old in-out. Real horrorshow, my little droogies!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    weird

    awsome, very sick and twisted.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Favorite movie of all time

    I am a big fan of Kubrick...this is his best...(eyes wide shut is the worst).... Not for the kids

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2002

    great movie

    This is classic cinema. Truely a great film

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2001

    Disturbing, but Around #15 on Top Movies

    Well, I first saw this movie after my sister's boyfriend strongly recommended it. It was very disturbing, like he said, but it is amazing because of it's originality. It leaves you thinking about it after its over and wanting to watch it again. I don't want to get into it, because I hate long reviews.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 37 Customer Reviews