Afterschool

Afterschool

Director: Antonio Campos

Cast: Antonio Campos, Ezra Miller, Jeremy White, Emory Cohen

     
 

Violence and voyeurism lurk beneath the surface of life at an exclusive prep school in this independent drama. Robert (Ezra Miller) is a high school student who has made a hobby out of dulling his senses with violent pornography that he finds on the Internet. While Robert doesn't have many friends, he does have a habit of documenting theSee more details below

Overview

Violence and voyeurism lurk beneath the surface of life at an exclusive prep school in this independent drama. Robert (Ezra Miller) is a high school student who has made a hobby out of dulling his senses with violent pornography that he finds on the Internet. While Robert doesn't have many friends, he does have a habit of documenting the habits of his classmates with a digital video camera, and he happens to be on hand when two girls from his class succumb to fatal drug overdoses. As the deaths leave the school's faculty at a lost for what to do and send many of the students into a state of depression and denial, Robert finds himself becoming even more alienated from the world around him. Afterschool was the first feature film from writer and director Antonio Campos, and was screened as part of the "Un Certain Regard" series at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Josh Ralske
Robert (Ezra Miller), the central character of writer-director Antonio Campos's feature debut, Afterschool, is an alienated sophomore at a posh New York-area boarding school. "I think I might be a bad person," he tells his mother on the phone. A few days later, while working on an extracurricular video project, he witnesses and records a tragic incident in a school hallway, and his response brings up further questions about his character and his relationship to the often-disturbing images that constantly bombard him. Campos's film has polarized audiences on the festival circuit, and it's easy to see why. It's a challenging film, both formally and thematically, and it's genuinely disturbing. There are some brilliant moments that cunningly play on audience expectations: a boy and girl playfully struggle for control of a video camera, but we sense something more serious at stake; we hear some kids watching Robert's video of the aforementioned horrific incident, and make a terrifyingly incorrect assumption about its provenance. Afterschool has been compared to Gus Van Sant's Elephant. They're both high school tragedies with a self-conscious visual aesthetic (long takes, slowly moving camera), so it seems like a natural comparison, but while Harris Savides's camera smoothly tracks along with Elephant's kids, Afterschool DP Jody Lee Lipes pans right past them, often coming to rest with the characters cut off by the frame. These gorgeously off-kilter widescreen images are blurred together with consumer-quality video. Campos's script is similarly more knotty and unsettled than Van Sant's. Point-of-view is frequently called into question, as are assumptions about what is genuine. "Are they seriously doing this?" one witness is heard remarking while a hallway altercation is recorded on cell phones. Campos may not get all the credit he deserves for his film's ambition because it's a milieu that feels very familiar -- over-mediated (and over-medicated), bored privileged high school kids wreak havoc -- but Afterschool is unusually thoughtful, and thought-provoking. Many contemporary arthouse filmmakers have ventured into the kind of content associated with pornography and horror, but Campos is more than a provocateur. His depiction of sex, drugs, violence, and death at a bucolic upscale boarding school is harrowing and haunting because he is interested in a genuine interrogation of contemporary adolescence, in all its exasperating complexity.

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Product Details

Release Date:
09/14/2010
UPC:
0030306977096
Original Release:
2008
Rating:
NR
Source:
Ifc Independent Film
Region Code:
1
Time:
1:47:00
Sales rank:
74,647

Special Features

Trailers and Posters; Unused Video from the Film; Storyboards; Deleted and Alternate Scenes; Stuhlbarg Uncut and Virgil Montage, Outtakes from the Film; The Last 15, Short Film by Antonio Campos; Interview with Actor Ezra Miller

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Ezra Miller Robert
Jeremy White Dave
Emory Cohen Trevor
Michael Stuhlbarg Mr. Burke
Addison Timlin Amy
Rosemarie DeWitt Teacher
Lee Wilkof Mr. Wiseman
Paul Sparks Detective
Bill Raymond Mr. Williams
Gary Wilmes Mr. Virgil
Christopher McCann Mr. Ullman

Technical Credits
Antonio Campos Director,Editor,Screenwriter
Victor Aaron Executive Producer
Catherine Akana Costumes/Costume Designer
Micah Bloomberg Sound/Sound Designer
Micah Bloomberg Sound/Sound Designer
Andrew Corkin Associate Producer
T. Sean Durkin Producer
Rose Ganguzza Executive Producer
Randi Glass Casting
Jody Lee Lipes Cinematographer
William Logan Art Director
Josh Mond Producer
Kris Moran Production Designer
Jesse Ozeri Co-producer
Gael Rakotondrabe Score Composer
Andrew Renzi Executive Producer
Susan Shopmaker Casting,Executive Producer
Zac Stuart-Pontier Asst. Director

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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Afterschool
1. The 'Net [6:58]
2. Malefactions [4:26]
3. Lunch [6:22]
4. Afterschool Activities [4:24]
5. Crew #2 [8:18]
6. The Twins [5:12]
7. Questioning [6:53]
8. Remembrance [5:02]
9. Mr. & Mrs. Talbert [5:15]
10. First Time [4:35]
11. Angles [5:00]
12. "What Are You Thinking?" [4:12]
13. New Rules [4:51]
14. Alone [4:24]
15. Real Moments [4:32]
16. Director's Cut [5:42]
17. "You Killed Them!" [7:19]
18. Producer's Cut [4:39]
19. Why [4:08]
20. End Credits [4:24]

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