Aida (Gran Teatre del Liceu)

Aida (Gran Teatre del Liceu)

5.0 1
Director: Toni Bargallo

Cast: Daniela Dessi, Elisabetta Fiorillo, Fabio Armiliato

     
 

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Opus Arte presents this 2003 performance of Giuseppe Verdi's opera Aida by the Gran Teatre del Liceu. With a cast featuring such notables as Daniela Dessi, Fabio Armiliato, Elisabetta Fiorillo, Roberto Scandiuzzi, and Juan Pons, this production was also performed using the historic "trompe-l'oeil" paper sets of Josep Mestres Cabanes (made from 1936-1945).

Overview

Opus Arte presents this 2003 performance of Giuseppe Verdi's opera Aida by the Gran Teatre del Liceu. With a cast featuring such notables as Daniela Dessi, Fabio Armiliato, Elisabetta Fiorillo, Roberto Scandiuzzi, and Juan Pons, this production was also performed using the historic "trompe-l'oeil" paper sets of Josep Mestres Cabanes (made from 1936-1945).

Product Details

Release Date:
07/20/2004
UPC:
0809478000945
Original Release:
2003
Rating:
NR
Source:
Bbc / Opus Arte
Region Code:
0
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[stereo, DTS 5.1-Channel Surround Sound]
Time:
3:06:00

Special Features

Cast gallery; Set gallery; Illustrated synopsis; Josep Mestres Cabanes at the Liceu

Related Subjects

Cast & Crew

Scene Index

Side #1 -- Disc 1
2. Prelude [3:50]
3. Scene I: Sì: Corre Voce [1:33]
4. Scene I: Se Quel Guerrier Io Fossi!/Celeste Aida [4:48]
5. Scene I: Quale Insolita Fiamma [2:42]
6. Scene I: Dessa! [3:31]
7. Scene I: Alta Cagion V'aduna [3:21]
8. Scene I: Su! Del Cor Prorompa il Grido/Su! Del Nilo al Sacro Lido [2:56]
9. Scene I: Ritorna Vincitor!/L'Insana Parola [8:17]
10. Scene II: Possente Fthà [3:23]
11. Scene II: Sacred Dance of the Priestesses [3:03]
12. Scene II: Nume, Custode e Vindice [5:39]
1. Scene I: Chi Mai Fra Gl'inni e i Plausi/Ah! Vieni [3:33]
2. Scene I: Dance of the Little Moorish Slaves [3:12]
3. Scene I: Fu la Sorte del l'Armi/Amore, Amore! Gaudio... Tormento [11:22]
4. Scene II: Processional/Gloria All'egitto - Triumphal March [4:55]
5. Scene II: Ballet [4:44]
6. Scene II: Vieni, O Guerriero Vindice [2:13]
7. Scene II: Salvator Della Patria [4:03]
8. Scene II: Ma Tu, Re/Struggi, O Re/Gloria All'egitto [12:45]
Side #2 -- Disc 2
1. O Tu Che Sei d'Osiride [5:12]
2. Qui Radamès Verrà/O Patria Mia [8:23]
3. Ciel! Mio Padre! [1:29]
4. Rivedrai le Foreste Imbalsamate [7:07]
5. Pur Ti Riveggo [10:56]
6. Tu!... Amonasro!/Io Son Disonorato! [3:47]
1. Scene I: L'Abborrita Rivale a Me Sfuggia [4:11]
2. Scene I: Già i Sacerdoti Adunansi [7:30]
3. Scene I: Ohimè! [3:02]
4. Scene I: Spirto del Nume [9:05]
5. Scene II: La Fatal Pietra/Morir!... Sì Pura e Bella! [12:35]
6. Credits and Applause [5:54]

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Aida (Gran Teatre del Liceu) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Beirut768 More than 1 year ago
'Very Good interpretation'
This is the comment I have been receiving from those who saw this Opera, live.
The DVD is not different.

As far as I am concerned it has been able to provide proper appreciation of the creative work of such dramatic presentations set to music.
Aida, Opera of grandiose libretto and refined orchestra (The Grand March and Ballet), was supposed to see its premier in Cairo in 1869.
Ismail Pasha, the Khedive of Egypt, was the father eternal of the Grand Opera-House of Cairo.

The Pasha aimed at excelling Western cultures as art paramour and he asked Verdi to write an opera to be a masterpiece for posterity and take perpetual patriotic touches on the opening of the Cairo Opera House in 1869. (Not the opening of the Suez Canal as many believe so)
Eventually it had premiered in December 1871 due to the Franco-Prussian war, which created difficulties to transport the costumes and related paraphernalia from Paris to Egypt. The Acts scenes are at Memphis, the capital of ancient Egypt, and require large number of players, Priests, Egyptian populace, Ethiopians prisoners of war, slaves, guards and soldiers and a spacious stage.

I wonder how the people in charge of any theatre should be able to provide the necessary accommodations...