All the Vermeers in New York

Overview

Mark is a broker who is nearly burned out from the terrible pressures and stresses of working on Wall Street. He finds solace in the cool confines of the Vermeer Room in the Metropolitan Museum. He is there one day when he encounters a beautiful French woman whose countenance closely resembles one of his favorite paintings, Head of a Young Woman. She is Anna, a struggling young actress who longs for home, and he asks her out for coffee. Later, she shows up at the cafe with her roommate Felicity in tow. At first ...
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Overview

Mark is a broker who is nearly burned out from the terrible pressures and stresses of working on Wall Street. He finds solace in the cool confines of the Vermeer Room in the Metropolitan Museum. He is there one day when he encounters a beautiful French woman whose countenance closely resembles one of his favorite paintings, Head of a Young Woman. She is Anna, a struggling young actress who longs for home, and he asks her out for coffee. Later, she shows up at the cafe with her roommate Felicity in tow. At first she pretends that she doesn't speak or understand English, but Mark is not fooled. They soon begin seeing each other and a bittersweet romance ensues, for neither is able to overcome the pressure of their personal agendas and allow themselves to fall in love. Made by noted experimental auteur Jon Jost, All the Vermeers in New York features largely improvised dialog and operates at different levels as a romance, a subtle satire making arch observations about the intermingling of art and business, a fantasy, and a visual work of art.
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Special Features

Original theatrical trailer; Vermeers Suite: concert version of score by Jon A. English; Filmographies/awards; Production notes; Scene selection
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
Jon Jost has described All the Vermeers in New York as "an elegy" for the '80s. The greed, consumption, and alienation that have become associated with that decade are portrayed as obstacles that keep the main characters Mark and Anna from connecting to each other and to what makes life meaningful. As true as this may be, it's a somewhat awkward thematic concept, and it tips the movie into the heavy-handedness that occasionally infects Jost's work. As a filmmaker, Jost has always seemed constricted in urban settings. The American West is a better fit for his visual sensibility, and his social and political convictions come across more forcefully when filtered through the lives of individual characters isolated in its vastness. He takes the opposite approach with Vermeers. The characters seem to be illustrations of ideas rather than people, and the result is one of his most arch and mannered efforts. Even the film's visual beauty feels strained. As if repaying a debt to Vermeer himself, Jost uses his phenomenal talent for light and composition to make repeated references to Vermeer's work that come across as a little too self-conscious. Vermeers was more widely distributed than Jost's other films -- it's one of the few that can be readily found on video -- and even with its flaws, audiences and critics unfamiliar with his more experimental work found it alternately frustrating, thought-provoking, and moving.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 5/7/2002
  • UPC: 723339113899
  • Original Release: 1990
  • Rating:

  • Source: World Artists
  • Region Code: 0
  • Aspect Ratio: Theatre Wide-Screen (1.85.1)
  • Presentation: Letterbox
  • Language: English
  • Time: 1:27:00
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Emmanuelle Chaulet Anna
Stephen Lack Mark
Grace Phillips Felicity
Gracie Mansion Gallery Owner - Herself
Gordon Joseph Weiss Gordon
Laurel Lee Kiefer Ariel Ainsworth
Roger Ruffin Max
Katherine Bean Nicole
Technical Credits
Jon Jost Director, Art Director, Cinematographer, Editor, Screenwriter
Jon A. English Score Composer
Lidsay Law Executive Producer
Henry Rosenthal Producer
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Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Main Title: Chaos [4:20]
2. The Commerce of Art [11:28]
3. The Art of Commerce [4:38]
4. Indoor Aerial [1:06]
5. Met Meet [8:37]
6. Literary Stroll [:59]
7. The Cafe Babel [8:10]
8. La Prisonniere [3:24]
9. Father Knows Best [4:19]
10. Over Ant Street [5:22]
11. Letter From Home [:50]
12. It Ain't Over... [3:33]
13. The Art of Power [8:41]
14. Flight [2:18]
15. Schmeist [10:46]
16. The Power of Art [8:28]
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Menu

Side #1 --
   Play Movie
   Scene Selection
   Special Features
      Original Theatrical Trailer
      Filmographies and Awards
         Jon Jost
            Awards
         Emmanuelle Chaulet
         Stephen Lack
      All the Vermeers in New York Suite - Concert Version of Score by Jon A. English
      Production Notes
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