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And This is Free
     

And This is Free

5.0 1
 
For nearly a century, sociologists termed Chicago's famed Maxwell Street "The Ellis Island of the Midwest," given its heterogeneous blend of races, religions, and social types running the gamut from businessmen to hustlers. The locale, of course, is perhaps best known for its rollicking blues and stirring gospel music. The 1964 documentary And This is Free

Overview

For nearly a century, sociologists termed Chicago's famed Maxwell Street "The Ellis Island of the Midwest," given its heterogeneous blend of races, religions, and social types running the gamut from businessmen to hustlers. The locale, of course, is perhaps best known for its rollicking blues and stirring gospel music. The 1964 documentary And This is Free travels to the Maxwell Street of the early '60s for a direct cinema plunge into the fray of on-street activity, with a particularly strong emphasis on the musical element.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Steve Futterman
A remarkable documentary that preserves a time and place now gone, And This Is Free captures the sights and sounds of an urban environment that helped lend Chicago much of its legendary character. Director Mike Shea spent 16 weekends combing the Maxwell Street shopping district, where disparate ethnic groups came together to form a homogenous neighborhood market. Released in 1964, the beautifully photographed and imaginatively edited film retrieves an era before standardization of urban commerce -- read: shopping centers and malls -- became the norm. Rows upon rows of street vendors selling every imaginable product stood cheek-by-jowl with street musicians singing the blues, religious groups preaching and vocalizing, and hucksters trying to get over on the crowd, all bordered by legitimate shops, department stores, and restaurants. African Americans, Jews, Puerto Ricans, Gypsies, slumming suburbanites, college kids soaking up atmosphere, and down-at-the-heels families all mingle in harmony, the lure of the bargain and cheap entertainment drawing them together. Shea’s narrator-free direction makes use of artful montages of interlocking images and sounds that emphasizes the area’s melting-pot unity. The 50-minute And This Is Free, is joined by two short documentaries: one on the Jewish legacy of Maxwell Street, the other, a portrait of the area making use of valuable found footage. Additional treats arrive by way of a music CD stocked with atypical Chicago blues performances, and a 36-page booklet that brings the neighborhood to life through photos and firsthand accounts of its vivid history.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/10/2008
UPC:
0016351680198
Original Release:
1964
Source:
Shanachie
Region Code:
0
Time:
1:40:00
Sales rank:
27,688

Cast & Crew

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- And This is Free: The Life and Times of Chicago's Legendary Maxwell St
1. Opening / Arvella Gray [3:53]
2. If You've Got a Corn On Your Foot... [2:17]
3. Hey Sol, Ya Got Size 50? [2:13]
4. Johnny Young [4:53]
5. Wise Man Incense Huckster [2:53]
6. World's Smallest Saxophones [2:27]
7. Carrie Robinson "Power To Live Right" [5:32]
8. Fannie Brewer "I Shall Overcome" [2:47]
9. Back Yard Boogie [5:12]
10. Robert Nighthawk "Cheating & Lying Blues" [3:22]
11. Chicken Man [5:24]
12. Jim Brewer Group "I'll Fly Away" [6:47]
13. Opening [6:03]
14. World's Largest Sporting Goods Store [2:55]
15. Lyon's Delicatessen [6:15]
16. Anything and Everything For Sale [5:01]
17. Bargaining Made Maxwell Street Vibrant [3:21]
18. Some of This Should Be Saved [5:18]
19. Photo Show On Historic Maxwell Street [10:54]
20. Casey Jones, the Chicken Man [1:58]
21. Maxwell Street, 1940s [:50]
22. Daddy Stovepipe & Arvella Gray [:35]
23. Come Shop the Maxwell Street Market [1:01]
24. Gordon Quinn Interview [5:34]

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And This is Free 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
poughkeepsiejohn More than 1 year ago
If all you know about Chicago's Maxwell Street is that scene in "The Blues Brothers" movie where John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd see John Lee Hooker playing in the street, then you should check this movie out. "And This Is Free" is not one but two movies about the legendary Chicago block that became a consumer bonanza, an immigrant's hope, a huckster's paradise, a hotbed for preachers and of course, a launching pad for many blues musicians. The first movie was made in 1964 by Mike Shea. Shot in a black-and-white cinema verite style that recalls D. A. Pennebaker and The Maysals Brothers, "And This Is Free" captures a lot of what Maxwell Street was like just as the British Invasion was taking more than a few cues from the blues and making it big. We see a number of musicians who would become popular like Little Walter as well as a few who should have such as Johnny Young and Robert Nighthawk. However, we also get to see some terrific, spirited Gospel music by street preachers such as Jim Brewer and Carrie Robinson. In between all of this, we see people hawking things like The Rocket, guaranteed to make your car run faster without using too much gas. We see someone selling The World's Smallest Saxophone. We see a preacher who acts more like a hustler giving away Wise Man Incense. And then there's Casey Jones, The Chicken Man, a 80-something fellow who plays the accordian with a chicken on his head (and he gives a good performance until the police chase him away). The second film looks at the very early Maxwell Street at the turn of the 20th Century, when Jewish immigrants were coming to America and settled in the Maxwell area to open businesses and get a shot at the American dream. Some of them were successful, some were not. Much of the footage from the first film finds its way here as well because---and this is what makes this DVD so unique---there is a great feeling of camaraderie among these residents. There's a very good story of Lyon's Delicatessen, which started in the 1920's and its owner was forced to sell it off to a black man in the 1970's. Yet, the new owner spoke good Hebrew and kept the Kosher menu along with some soul food stuff. If this isn't enough for you, the set also comes with a CD of 17 songs from many of Maxwell Street's most prominent musicians. Most of it is blues like Snooky Pryor ("Cryin' Shame"), Arvella Gray ("John Henry"), Johnny Young ("Money Takin' Women") and Daddy Stovepipe ("The Spasm"). But it just so happens that there's a group called The Baby Face Leroy Trio which featured a musician named Muddy Waters---and we all know what happened to him. The old Maxwell Street is gone now; it was demolished in the early 1990's to make way for the expansion of a university. Still, if a business did well in Chicago, it's a good bet it got its start on Maxwell Street. If you heard good blues from the Windy City, chances are they played on Maxwell Street. The diverse influence was undeniable, as well the sensational music that came from here. You watch this DVD and even if you've never been to Chicago before, you really miss it.