Attila

( 8 )

Overview

Attila the Hun, fabled leader of a band of nomadic warriors who fearlessly took on the might of the Roman Empire, has his life story brought to the screen in this two-part miniseries. Attila Gerard Butler raised an army from the people of Caspia, and in time created a fighting force so strong that they received an annual tribute from the leaders of Rome as an inducement not to attack. Not all Romans were happy with this situation, and in time it was decided that General Aetius Powers Boothe, a brave yet ...
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Overview

Attila the Hun, fabled leader of a band of nomadic warriors who fearlessly took on the might of the Roman Empire, has his life story brought to the screen in this two-part miniseries. Attila Gerard Butler raised an army from the people of Caspia, and in time created a fighting force so strong that they received an annual tribute from the leaders of Rome as an inducement not to attack. Not all Romans were happy with this situation, and in time it was decided that General Aetius Powers Boothe, a brave yet unscrupulous leader who attempted to usurp the rule of Empress Placidia Alice Krige, was the only man who could confront Attila on his own terms. Aetius recognized Attila's skills as a leader, and decided the best way to prevent him from invading Rome was to lead him into an alliance, as Rome and the Huns joined forces against a third nation. But despite their mutual respect, it soon became apparent that only one man could be the undisputed leader in a meeting between Rome and the Huns. Attila also features Tim Curry as Theodosius, Simmone Jade MacKinnon as N'Kara, and Reg Rogers as Valentinian. Attila was first aired on the USA Cable Network on January 30 and 31, 2001.
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Mike Cummings
Director Dick Lowery mangles history in this 2001 TV miniseries in which Attila the Hun becomes Attila the Hunk, fifth century warriors use 12th century war machines, Attila's brother dies 13 years too soon, and Byzantine Emperor Theodosius II (Tim Curry) is still alive four years after his recorded death. However, the battle scenes and horsemanship are thrilling, and some of the acting is above average. In particular, Powers Booth plays Roman general Flavius Aetius -- the power behind the throne of Roman Emperor Valentinian III (Reg Rogers) -- with the right mix of political artifice, soldierly know-how, and fatherly love (for the adopted daughter he must give up for the good of the empire). Alice Krige is good, too, as nincompoop Valentinian's scheming mother, and Steven Berkoff and Liam Cunningham demonstrate that barbarians can think as well as fight. But as Attila, Gerard Butler lacks the gravity and depth of the cunning and ruthless Flagellum Dei, or Scourge of God, as Attila was known. Fault the casting directors, in part, for this failure, for Butler -- who is tall and blue-eyed with a Herculean physique -- bears no resemblance to the historical Attila, who was short and snub-nosed. Another glaring weakness is Lowery's failure to depict language barriers between the Huns and the Romans, and between the Romans and the Visigoths. Everybody speaks a universal lingua franca, with British and American accents. To hold the interest of the audience, the production surrounds Attila and Valentinian with buxom beauties and throws in soothsaying, a magical sword (à la Excalibur), and plenty of throat-slitting and poisoned goblets. No mention is made of what ultimately chased Attila from Rome: plague. Attila is an okay action film, but not much more.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/18/2001
  • UPC: 696306018636
  • Original Release: 2001
  • Rating:

  • Source: Polygram Usa Video
  • Format: VHS

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Gerard Butler Attila
Powers Boothe Flavius Aetius
Simmone Mackinnon N'Kara/Ilidico
Tim Curry Theodosius
Reg Rogers Valentionian
Alice Krige Placidia
Steven Berkoff Rua
Tommy Flanagan Bleda
Pauline Lynch Galen
Liam Cunningham King Theodoric
Jolyon Baker Mundzak
Sian Phillips Grandmother
Jonathan Hyde Felix
Technical Credits
Dick Lowry Director
Caldecot "Cotty" Chubb Executive Producer
Robert Cochran Screenwriter
Sean Daniel Executive Producer
Tod Feuerman Editor
Steven Fierberg Cinematographer
Kenn Michael Fuller Sound/Sound Designer
Nick Glennie-Smith Score Composer
Ros Hubbard Casting
James Jacks Executive Producer
Michael R. Joyce Executive Producer
Robin Lippin Casting
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    How funny

    This was just too funny not to like, even if it was historically inaccurate. I liked its how stupid "predictions" and "pretexts" that Attila took so much to heart from the magician's Galan's prophecies. Its seductiveness of the women was nice as well!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Wonderful!

    I LOVE this movie, and although it was historically inaccurate, you can forgive them, because it is highly entertaining, and Gerry did a WONDERFUL job!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Attilla the fun and gorgous Hun

    This is a fun and engrossing film. You definitely have to 'suspend disbelief', but once you embrace the cheesy costumes and some silly characters (Galen, for instance) this movie is a total blast. It isn't historically accurate and was obviously not made on a Braveheart kind of budget, but despite this it is a very worthwile movie. Gerard Butler as Attilla was fantastic. His acting was sincere and high quality. He made Attilla seem a lot more glamorous than he probably was, but most women would rather see Attilla die gorgous in the bedroom, tragically murdered by his betraying bride than passed out with a bloody nose as he is rumored to have died in real life. Butler is perfect for these historical roles and combines celtic warrior looks with sensitive acting. Powers Boothe also stood out, almost stealing the show. Since they were making up history it would have been nice to tie up a few loose ends, (like what happened to Atius's daughter?) but other than that this was a fun and thoroughly enjoyable movie. Perfect for when you have the flu and need a long movie to cheer you up.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Attila In Hollywood

    Gerard Butler plays Attila as the king of the Huns with a sensitive side and as a visionary. The movie is entertaining but is light on historical and anthropological accuracy. The movie does allude to the fact that the Huns were people of the steppes and cared for little else than their nomadic existence. Following the spirit of Genghis Kahn's famous quote of almost eight centuries later, what was best in life for the Huns was to crush the enemy; see them driven before them; take their cattle; and hear the lamentation of their women. Unfortunately, Butler's performance fails to show that ethos. His performance is forced and his dilemma is partially due to a poor script; this is made all too obvious in his apologetically soft and withheld exclamation, 'We should rule the world!' The movie would have held more sway if it would have depicted the Huns for what they really were, Asiatic nomads, supreme cavaliers, and masters of archery who plundered their victims by pillage, massacre and extortion. The Huns must have been barbaric indeed if they struck fear in the still very barbaric Gothic tribes of Northern Europe. On the Roman side, Powers Boothe as Aetius is probably one of the better performances in this film but it's nothing to brag about. The mannerisms and culture of Rome depicted are stereotypical. The movie tries to create an impression of Rome as a pagan and decadent state but Christianity had significantly taken its hold since it was made the official state religion by Constantine almost two centuries before. The ritualized orgy depicted in the film was therefore out of place. The costumes were also either a mix between futuristic or more of the early empire and late republic. In terms of historical accuracy, the battle scenes were obviously under a limited budget. The actual battles involved far more than the few hundred shown in the film. The legionary tactics and equipment were also horribly out of date by several centuries. The tactics of the legions had shifted from using the traditional infantry cohorts and maniples to the extensive use of fluid cavalry tactics: the infantry had been relegated to marginal roles for over a century. The age of the legendary Roman infantry with pilum and gladius was a thing of the past. The movie was a brave attempt and not too bad for a T.V. miniseries and, in that context, deserves three stars. Definitely something worth renting.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Tremendous Acting But...

    Although I thought the cast was magnificent and the sets and costuming (particularly in Rome) were lavishly beautiful, I have my doubts that Attila was as warm and fuzzy as this film portrays him. If he had been as handsome and articulate as Gerard Butler's portrayal the Roman women would have torn down the walls of Rome to let him and his people in. I do not know if the Huns were any more or any less savages than any other conquerors but the key word here is savage. Still, the entertainment level of this film is great!!! In an ironic twist of fate, Gerard Butler is cast as Dracula in the film ''Dracula 2000.'' As any Dracula enthusiast knows, the Count claims descent from Attila and the Huns. It's kind of fun to have two films where the two characters resemble each other.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Epic Fun

    This large tv movie is so much visual and dramatic fun that you almost feel guilty watching it. Most people, I think, have at least a vague idea that Attila (the Hun) was a warrior/leader of some merit and that he was supposedly, short, dark and ugly. So when Attila shows up in this movie as tall, dark and handsome and with green eyes, we know the filmmakers decided to amuse themselves and us by taking dramatic license with the idea of Attila as well as his life. Go with it because if you're a purist looking for historically accurate filmmaking, watch public broadcasting. But look past Gerard Butler's exceptional exterior (and he IS great looking) and the ''Zena Warrior Princess''-style costumes and you'll find solid acting propelling the film. Butler is really wonderful as is the rest of the cast: Powers Booth, Tim Curry, Steven Berkoff, Pauline Lynch and Alice Krige. My only quarrel, Reg Rogers as the stereotypical Hollywood version of an idiotic Roman emperor, very over-the-top. If Roman emperors were as moronic as Hollywood would have us believe, their empire wouldn't have stretched from Britain to North Africa to the Persian Gulf and it wouldn't have lasted one day let alone officially from 27BC - AD395. Forget him and enjoy the production, the acting and Butler who has that ''star'' quality of being beautiful enough for the ''women to want him'' and of being ''real guy'' enough that the ''men want to be him.'' A taller, Scottish Mel Gibson, if you will.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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