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Bad Education
     

Bad Education

5.0 3
Director: Pedro Almodóvar, Fele Martínez, Gael García Bernal, Daniel Jiménez Cacho

Cast: Pedro Almodóvar, Fele Martínez, Gael García Bernal, Daniel Jiménez Cacho

 
Pedro Almodóvar's Bad Education arrives on DVD with a widescreen anamorphic transfer that preserves the original theatrical aspect ratio of 2.35:1. The Spanish soundtrack is rendered in Dolby Digital 5.1. English subtitles are accessible. Supplemental materials include a commentary by the Oscar-winning director (consumers should be aware that the commentary is

Overview

Pedro Almodóvar's Bad Education arrives on DVD with a widescreen anamorphic transfer that preserves the original theatrical aspect ratio of 2.35:1. The Spanish soundtrack is rendered in Dolby Digital 5.1. English subtitles are accessible. Supplemental materials include a commentary by the Oscar-winning director (consumers should be aware that the commentary is in Spanish and is not subtitled), deleted scenes, a look at many of the posters worked up to help promote the film, the original trailer, and footage from the film's screening at the AFI Film Festival. This disc offers the uncut NC-17 version of the film; an R-rated version is available on a different release.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Bill Pearis
One of current cinema's most audacious directors, Pedro Almodóvar has never been one to shy away from hot-button topics such as sex, religion, and politics. This remains true with his latest film, a brilliantly lurid tale of lust, jealousy, betrayal, murder, and revenge. The story begins in 1980, as talented young director Enrique (Fele Martínez) is scanning the tabloids in search of an idea for his next film, when inspiration literally comes knocking at his door. It is a young man (The Motorcycle Diaries' Gael García Bernal) claiming to be Ignacio, an old friend whom Enrique has not seen in 16 years. Ignacio is now an actor and has brought with him a story, "The Visit," based on his and Enrique's Catholic schoolboy experiences. Ignacio wants Enrique to make "The Visit" his next film, with him as the star. His story details how Ignacio and Enrique fell in love -- which enraged the school's headmaster, Father Manolo, whose interest in Ignacio became an obsession. From here, Bad Education's plot turns exceedingly labyrinthine, blurring the lines between the present, flashbacks, and the film version of "The Visit." This is not another story about priests molesting choirboys. Almodóvar has much more on his mind than that, and we wouldn't dare give anything away. More than anything, Bad Education is an homage to Hitchcock -- Vertigo in particular -- from its opening titles to Alberto Iglesias' Bernard Herrmann-inspired score to its tragic, pitch-black finale. It's hard to imagine Hitch making a movie quite like this, but he probably would approve.
All Movie Guide - Josh Ralske
It seems that with each passing film, Pedro Almodóvar's palette gets a little darker. Bad Education is his most somber film to date (with the possible exception of Live Flesh), a brooding drama about past demons returning to the present, about lost love, lost faith, and mistaken identity, all haunted by the strains of "Moon River" and an ancient image of legendary Spanish singer-actress Sara Montiel. The film is filled with allusions to the past, to the repression and corruption of fascist Spain and a Catholic boarding school (like the one Almodóvar attended), but also to a cinematic past that is clearly just as crucial to the world view of Almodóvar and his tormented cast of characters. While Bad Education owes a tremendous debt to classic film noir, it's also an unquestionably personal work, beyond the simple fact that it's about a filmmaker, Enrique Goded (Fele Martínez) grappling with his influences, and with fiction's ultimate usefulness (and inadequacy) in dredging up the truths of the past. Almodóvar has always excelled at writing strong female characters, but he seems to be growing less interested in that kind of projection, as in his last film, Talk to Her, they were all comatose, and in this one they're nonexistent, unless you count the film's cross-dressing "femme fatale," seductively played by Gael García Bernal, and his uproarious sidekick, Paca (Javier Cámara). Almodóvar is an increasingly precise filmmaker, in terms of both image and sound, and this film, while rich and intricate, sacrifices some of the joyful spontaneity of his earlier work. It feels just a bit airless.

Product Details

Release Date:
04/12/2005
UPC:
0043396069466
Original Release:
2004
Rating:
NC-17
Source:
Sony Pictures
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby AC-3 Surround Sound]
Time:
1:45:00
Sales rank:
9,378

Special Features

Audio commentary with director Pedro Almodóvar; Deleted scenes; Red carpet footage from AFI Film Festival; Making of Bad Education; Photo gallery: poster explorations; Original Spanish theatrical trailer; Bonus previews

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Fele Martínez Enrique Goded
Gael García Bernal Angel,Juan,Zahara
Daniel Jiménez Cacho Father Manolo
Lluís Homar Sr. Berenguer
Javier Camára Paca
Petra Martínez Ignacio's Mother
Nacho Perez Young Ignacio
Raul Garcia Forneiro Enrique Kid
Alberto Ferreiro Enrique Serrano
Leonor Watling Actor
Francisco Boira Ignacio Rodriguez
Francisco Maestre Father Jose
Juan Fernandez Martin
Ignacio Perez Ignacio Kid
Sandra Carter Productions Sandra
Roberto Hoyas Galicia's Barman

Technical Credits
Pedro Almodóvar Director,Screenwriter
Jose Luis Alcaine Cinematographer,Editor
Agustín Almodóvar Producer
Esther Garcia Executive Producer
Antxon Gomez Art Director
Alberto Iglesias Score Composer
Ana Lozano Makeup
Joaquin Manchado Camera Operator
Miguel Rejas Sound/Sound Designer
José Salcedo Editor

Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Start [3:01]
2. Ignacio [4:47]
3. Connection [3:55]
4. Enrique Again [5:26]
5. Two by Two [3:10]
6. Stealing From the Church [3:39]
7. Father Manolo [4:43]
8. Blackmail [3:10]
9. Torna a Sorrento [4:53]
10. Cinema Sin [2:48]
11. Predator [4:41]
12. Greenlighted [3:03]
13. La Perla [4:14]
14. Hungry Crocodiles [3:48]
15. Research [2:20]
16. Galacia [1:32]
17. Twist [4:02]
18. Audition [4:22]
19. Ignacio's End [5:10]
20. Mr. Berenguer [2:30]
21. Alternate Blackmail [3:25]
22. One Week [1:55]
23. Juan [3:47]
24. Death Plot [4:04]
25. Killing Time [3:27]
26. Split [4:12]
27. Goodbye to Juan [3:47]
28. Wrap Up [5:27]

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Bad Education 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This cinematic masterpiece was one of the highlights of 2004. Pedro Almodovar gets better with each and every movie. He is the best writer/director working in movies today. Gael Garcia Bernal is a an actor who is absolutely fearless in what he will do on screen. In this movie he does it all---in three different roles. He is the great new actor of the age. And no one working in movies is sexier.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Once more, Pedro Almodovar surprises us with a dark but, at the same time, colorful movie. Do not expect a moving and poetical movie as Talk to her. Bad education is a movie which leaves you cold and full of dark feelings (just the way the story goes on). Bad education grows up thanks to a complex narrative, that envolves you so much that sometimes you feel you are walking around a passion maze. Actually, this is the key word which envolves all Bad education's essence: passion. Passion for living, passion for loving, passion for shotting, passion for killing, passion for enjoying, this case, an incredible masterpiece: Bad Education.