Barbarella

Barbarella

2.9 12
Director: Roger Vadim

Cast: Jane Fonda, John Phillip Law, Anita Pallenberg

     
 

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In 1965 Jane Fonda married French director Roger Vadim, who had enjoyed spectacular success with his convention-breaking film And God Created Woman, which starred his then-wife Brigitte Bardot. Vadim cast Fonda as the title character in his colorful 1968 Panavision film Barbarella, Queen of the Galaxy, and the results shine on DVD. The film is presented

Overview

In 1965 Jane Fonda married French director Roger Vadim, who had enjoyed spectacular success with his convention-breaking film And God Created Woman, which starred his then-wife Brigitte Bardot. Vadim cast Fonda as the title character in his colorful 1968 Panavision film Barbarella, Queen of the Galaxy, and the results shine on DVD. The film is presented in widescreen format which does the bizarre sets and landscapes justice. It also comes in Dolby Digital stereo and can be played in English or French. Also included are the standard interactive menus and scene selections, as well as the original theatrical trailer, which in and of itself is a great example of true kitsch from this bygone era. Unfortunately, the DVD does not include any information on the actors or director, or a history of the film's production. For such a bizarre and campy film, some sort of additional information would have been appreciated, especially for the uninitiated, who are probably wondering how on earth Jane Fonda came to make this film.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Brian J. Dillard
A coy European sex comedy with space-opera trappings and an American accent, this frothy Roger Vadim/Jane Fonda collaboration reads like a grown-up, sci-fi update of Alice in Wonderland. Although it often pops up on "Worst Movies Ever" lists, it's actually something of a treat if one approaches it with the right attitude. From the eye-popping plasticity of the production design to the gentle grooviness of the Bob Crewe Generation's campy lounge soundtrack, Barbarella is a defiantly trivial film. But Fonda's studied vacuity, Anita Pallenberg's kinky glamour, and John Phillip Law's bronzed pecs and hippie truisms keep things sexy, sweet, and funny. Fonda has spent more than three decades trying to live down the zero-gee peep show that opens the film, but besides a few bare breasts and countless double entendres, nothing here crosses the line between erotic comedy and pornography. (In fact, the MPAA bizarrely let the film off with a mere PG.) The gender roles aren't particularly progressive, especially given the running gag about Barbarella getting her first few tastes of physical copulation after a lifetime of "advanced" virtual sex. But unless you're a humorless dogmatist, a puritan, or a holdover from the anti-"Hanoi Jane" school of patriotism, it's hard to be anything but amused and entertained by this campy classic.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/22/1999
UPC:
0097360681277
Original Release:
1968
Rating:
PG
Source:
Paramount
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[monaural]
Time:
1:38:00
Sales rank:
4,618

Special Features

Widescreen version enhanced for 16x9; Dolby Digital: English mono; French mono; Interactive menus; Scene selection; Theatrical trailer

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Jane Fonda Barbarella
John Phillip Law Pygar
Anita Pallenberg Black Queen
Milo O'Shea Durand-Durand, The Concierge
David Hemmings Dildano
Joan Greenwood The Great Tyrant [uncredited]
Maria Theresa Orsini Suicide Girl (uncredited)
Catherine Chevallier Stomoxys
Marie Therese Chevallier Glossina
Marcel Marceau Prof. Ping
Talitha Pol Pipe-smoking girl
Antonio Sabato Jean-Paul (uncredited)
Ugo Tognazzi Mark Hand
Franco Gula Actor
Claude Dauphin President of Earth
Veronique Vendell Captain Moon
Serge Marquand Captain Sun
Nino Musco Actor
Umberto DiGrazia Actor
Giancarlo Cobelli Actor
Charles Fox Conductor

Technical Credits
Roger Vadim Director,Screenwriter
Vittori Bonicelli Screenwriter
Claude Brule Screenwriter
Bob Crewe Score Composer,Musical Direction/Supervision
Dino de Laurentiis Producer
Brian Degas Screenwriter
Enrico Fea Art Director
Jacques Fonteray Costumes/Costume Designer
Jean-Claude Forest Screenwriter
Charles Fox Score Composer
Mario Garbuglia Production Designer
Tudor Gates Screenwriter
David Hildyard Sound/Sound Designer
Carlo Lastricati Asst. Director
Victoria Mercanton Editor
Claude Renoir Cinematographer
Terry Southern Screenwriter
Clement Biddle Wood Screenwriter

Scene Index

Scene Selection
0. Scene Selection

Videos

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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Barbarella 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I first saw this as a theatrical release when I was 16. I had the album and wore it out-great soundtrack. Tell me if I'm wrong, are some of the more risque scenes altered or cut? I thought Ms. Fonda was a lot more nude in the original. Rumor has it she had it done to protect her more recent image. It is still a wonderfully fun adult-themed movie. Pure joy.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Barbarella, is simply a campy vehicle for spouting about the 60's more than anything else. With its psychedelic rock score, it's hallucinogenic surrealism, and it's sexually charged plot line, not to mention utter silliness, it does fulfill its purpose of getting Jane Fonda naked, but folks, make no mistake about it, this is truly awful cinema.
beansy More than 1 year ago
This movie is entertaining. It is based on a comic or scifi book and I think it has that comic feel. There is a costume change every ten minutes and they are some awesome costumes. This movie is not a serious film and is perfect for those underground/B movie fans!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
AlchemystAZ More than 1 year ago
"An angel has no memory..." is worth the whole movie. Forgiveness? And the music during the aerial battle scence is really fun. But nothing surpasses the machine-attempt to overload Barbarella, and Anita Pallenberg's try too. Puritans in sheep's clothing may say it's bad, but we know it's a young boy's wet dream on film. It was originally a funny-paper CARTOON, and you can do anything in a cartoon. Some lack of tolerance should be ignored by freethinkers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have been trying to see this movie for ages, since I have a love for cheesy grade B type flicks. (Yes, I do own Attack of the Killer Tomatoes, and I do know the theme song by heart!) I was laughing so hard at the barely disguised sexual inuedo throughout the entire movie, and loved the costuming- where else can a girl get a new outfit every ten minutes? And the love organ? I want one of those!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I remember the first time I saw this movie when I was about 13 years old - maybe younger (I know, I was a little young, but their wasn't anything in the movie I couldn't figure out). I am an major fan of sci-fi (particularly Dr.Who) and I remembered how awsome the music in this movie was. I reason why I like it so much, other then the fact that it had good music and had an awsome storyline, is that it moves around alot and you see alot of the area where Barbarella moves around in. I miss seeing this movie (I went looking for it in the rental store and couldn't find it). But I still remember how great it was.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This DVD would better serve as a drink coaster, folks.....it's that bad.
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