Blade Runner: 30th Anniversary Collector's Edition

( 87 )

Overview

A blend of science fiction and noir detective fiction, Blade Runner 1982 was a box office and critical bust upon its initial exhibition, but its unique postmodern production design became hugely influential within the sci-fi genre, and the film gained a significant cult following that increased its stature. Harrison Ford stars as Rick Deckard, a retired cop in Los Angeles circa 2019. L.A. has become a pan-cultural dystopia of corporate advertising, pollution and flying automobiles, as well as replicants, ...
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Overview

A blend of science fiction and noir detective fiction, Blade Runner 1982 was a box office and critical bust upon its initial exhibition, but its unique postmodern production design became hugely influential within the sci-fi genre, and the film gained a significant cult following that increased its stature. Harrison Ford stars as Rick Deckard, a retired cop in Los Angeles circa 2019. L.A. has become a pan-cultural dystopia of corporate advertising, pollution and flying automobiles, as well as replicants, human-like androids with short life spans built by the Tyrell Corporation for use in dangerous off-world colonization. Deckard's former job in the police department was as a talented blade runner, a euphemism for detectives that hunt down and assassinate rogue replicants. Called before his one-time superior M. Emmett Walsh, Deckard is forced back into active duty. A quartet of replicants led by Roy Batty Rutger Hauer has escaped and headed to Earth, killing several humans in the process. After meeting with the eccentric Eldon Tyrell Joe Turkel, creator of the replicants, Deckard finds and eliminates Zhora Joanna Cassidy, one of his targets. Attacked by another replicant, Leon Brion James, Deckard is about to be killed when he's saved by Rachael Sean Young, Tyrell's assistant and a replicant who's unaware of her true nature. In the meantime, Batty and his replicant pleasure model lover, Pris Darryl Hannah use a dying inventor, J.F. Sebastian William Sanderson to get close to Tyrell and murder him. Deckard tracks the pair to Sebastian's, where a bloody and violent final confrontation between Deckard and Batty takes place on a skyscraper rooftop high above the city. In 1992, Ridley Scott released a popular director's cut that removed Deckard's narration, added a dream sequence, and excised a happy ending imposed by the results of test screenings; these legendary behind-the-scenes battles were chronicled in a 1996 tome, Future Noir: The Making of Blade Runner, by Paul M. Sammon.
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Special Features

The Rare Workprint Version, Documentary Dangerous Days, HD Stills Gallery with more than 1,000 Images
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Lucia Bozzola
Critics and audiences didn't care for it in 1982, but Ridley Scott's Blade Runner has since risen from cult object to classic of postmodern science fiction. A dystopian view of the future as a decaying, nostalgia-ridden junk culture, it features enormous neon billboards, ad blimps, and soaring Mayan temple-esque skyscrapers, evoking an infernal consumer society divided between those divinely living in the clouds and the multi-cultural exploited masses inhabiting the permanently dank streets. Only the robot "skin job" replicants understand the value of life and freedom. As Deckard's search for the replicants becomes a philosophical rumination on man, machine, and life, Blade Runner's striking production design and visual effects (supervised by FX maestro Douglas Trumbull) underline the cost to humanity of technology-obsessed late capitalism. Blade Runner's increasing stature merited the 10th anniversary release of the "Director's Cut," which rendered the film even more evocatively ambiguous by adding a brief unicorn dream and eliminating the studio-mandated voice-over narration and tacked-on "happy" ending.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 10/23/2012
  • UPC: 883929255467
  • Original Release: 1982
  • Source: Warner Home Video
  • Time: 3:47:00
  • Format: Blu-ray

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Harrison Ford Rick Deckard
Rutger Hauer Roy Batty
Sean Young Rachael
Edward James Olmos Gaff
M. Emmet Walsh Harry Bryant
Daryl Hannah Pris
William Sanderson J.F. Sebastian
Brion James Leon
Joe Turkel Tyrell
Joanna Cassidy Zhora
James Hong Chew
Morgan Paull Holden
Kevin Thompson Bear
John E. Allen Kaiser
Hy Pyke Taffey Lewis
Kimiko Hiroshige Cambodian Woman
Charles Knapp Bartender
Robert Okazaki Sushi Master
Technical Credits
Ridley Scott Director
Bud Alper Sound/Sound Designer
Newt Arnold Asst. Director
Charles Breen Set Decoration/Design
Jordan S. Cronenweth Cinematographer
Peg Cummings Set Decoration/Design
Linda de Scenna Set Decoration/Design
Michael Deeley Producer
David Dryer Special Effects Supervisor
Hampton Fancher Executive Producer, Screenwriter
Jane Feinberg Casting
Mike Fenton Casting
Michael Kaplan Costumes/Costume Designer
Brian Kelly Executive Producer
Charles Knode Costumes/Costume Designer
Marci Liroff Casting
Louis Mann Set Decoration/Design
Lawrence G. Paull Production Designer, Set Decoration/Design
David Peoples Screenwriter
Gregory Pickrell Set Decoration/Design
Darryl Ponicsan Screenwriter
Ivor Powell Associate Producer
Terry Rawlings Editor
Thomas Roysden Set Decoration/Design
William Ladd Skinner Set Decoration/Design
David Snyder Art Director
Douglas Trumbull Special Effects Supervisor
Vangelis Score Composer
Marvin Westmore Makeup
Bud Yorkin Producer
Richard Yuricich Special Effects Supervisor
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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Blade Runner: The Final Cut
1. Credits and Foreword [2:58]
2. Eye On The City [1:33]
3. Emotional Response [2:52]
4. Interrupted Sushi [3:53]
5. Old Blade Runner Magic [1:40]
6. Replicants In Question [3:59]
7. Rachael: Voight-Kampff Test [5:40]
8. Leon's Hotel Room [2:25]
9. Chew's Visitors [2:53]
10. If Only You Could See [2:23]
11. Someone Else's Memories [5:57]
12. Pris Meets Sebastian [5:10]
13. Deckard's Dream [:53]
14. Esper Enhancement [3:32]
15. Manufactured Skin [2:47]
16. Miss Salome [6:34]
17. Pursuing Zhora [2:08]
18. Retirement...Witnessed [2:17]
19. How Many To Go? [2:04]
20. Wake Up, Time To Die [1:26]
21. I Owe You One [2:37]
22. Say "Kiss Me" [1:50]
23. Only Two Of Us Now [4:54]
24. We Need You, Sebastian [3:33]
25. Right Moves [3:58]
26. Prodigal Son Brings Death [2:22]
27. No Way To Treat A Friend [4:38]
28. Death Among The Menagerie [1:32]
29. Proud Of Yourself? [5:16]
30. Wounded Animals [2:51]
31. Building Ledge [4:17]
32. The Roof [1:24]
33. To Live In Fear [1:54]
34. Like Tears In Rain [1:24]
35. Souvenir [3:08]
36. End Credits [3:17]
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Menu

Disc #1 -- Blade Runner: The Final Cut
   Introduction To Ridley Scott
   Play
   Scenes
   Features
      Introduction By Ridley Scott
      Commentaries
         Commentary By Director Ridley Scott
         Commentary By Executive Producer/Co-Screenwriter Hampton Fancher, Co-Screenwriter David Peoples, Producer Michael Deeley and Production Executive Katherine Haber
         Commentary By Visual Futurist Syd Mead, Prodution Designer Lawrence G. Paull, Art Director David L. Snyder and Special Photographic Effects Supervisors Douglas Trumbull, Richard Yuricich And David Dryer
   Languages
      Spoken Languages
         English
         Français
      Subtitles
         English (For The Hearing Impaired)
         Français
         Español
         Subtitles: Off
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 87 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(56)

4 Star

(12)

3 Star

(12)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(2)

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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Seminal sci-fi film noir

    This film remains one of the most influential and worthwhile of all time. It works because it can be simply a detective/sci-fi film that one enjoys with the theater popcorn and walks away from. Or it is an incredible film noir of a dark time where of lawlessness and where big business are more powerful than government and stays with you through the decades. The climax scene with Harrison Ford and Rutger Hauer on the roof in the rain is one of the most poignant cinematic moments of all time.What does it mean to be human? I hated this film the first time I saw it when it first arrived on screens in the 1980s, but grew to see more in it with each successive visit to the theater. It remains in my top five films now, 20+ years later. I'm a not sure removing Deckard's voiceovers in the Director's cut was the best move. In the original they provided an important backdrop to the film. Great performances by Edward James Olmos, Ford, Hauer, et al are not lost. Watch it more than once and you will pick up missed nuances that enhance one's understanding of the film.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    At least a narration OPTION please?

    If you don't like the original narration, fair enough and if you do, that's fair enough also. But it really seems to me like there should be an option of whether or not to have it. The other one-disc edition of the DVD doesn't have the narration either, and my fiancee really likes the narration. You'd think that over FOUR DISCS with all the crazy things they can do with DVDs they'd have an option to put the narration on, or another version of the DVD. Ridiculous, and a missed market.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Another Look

    I have taken another look at my past criticism of the Director’s cut. That fine-tuning improved and clarified the narrative. The added footage of the unicorn did the same. The two disc set was a great joy and the four disc set was well worth buying. I am tempted to write more, but the film deserves better than I can give it today. This is a great set to own. The film is a masterwork. The final cut is the best version. I think that the voice over can be fun to hear, but it adds nothing essential to the narration.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A Beginning and an End, Lacking Substance

    Blade Runner, while undoubtedly an imaginative feat, cannot be logically elevated to the position of "remarkable", and barely attains "passable". The beginning is compelling and forces the viewer immediately into the story, and Harrison Ford is quick to display his lovable roguish personality, yet gradually descends from there. In addition, the ending is masterful and heartrenching, as well as thought-provoking and intelligent. Yet the concept of humanoid robots, regardless of the fancy name "replicants" they are embellished with, is far from original (Look at I Robot, Robot Series, Foundation Series, 2001 Space Oddyssey, etc. etc.). Additonal concepts within the film, such as the gravitic cars, large digital billboards, etc. are present in films such as the Fifth Element, I Robot, Starship Troopers, and even Star Wars. In other words, the film lacked substance, and was often dull and repetitive. This is not to discredit Harrison Ford, however, who remains commanding in any role. In regards to those certain reviwers who refer to Star Wars fans as "childish", I personally very deeply regret that you lack the depth and penetration of thought to appreciate true art and a saga that embraces all of mankind when it is thrust so obviously before you.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    blade runner

    i remember seeing a little bit of this i think on tv maybe scifi or something. but now i finally get the see the whole thing on dvd, and its the director's cut. this movie was weird but very very imaginative. and was seeing this because of hauer after seeing him in the hitcher and ladyhawke. harrison's cool too. anyway, this is about a guy who has to find 5 replicants in a city that seems almost too real but still in the future. it was interesting and glad that i saw the director's cut which was the only one i could find at my library. and batty was one bad ass yet sad villian and love the hair. but will always remember hauer from hitcher and ladyhawke and this of course. and harrison has always been in any classic ish movie from star wars to indiana to witness. same with kurt russell and keith david.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2008

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2008

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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews