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Blind Spot: Hitler's Secretary
  • Alternative view 1 of Blind Spot: Hitler's Secretary
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Blind Spot: Hitler's Secretary

4.2 5
Director: Andre Heller, Othmar Schmiderer

Cast: Traudl Junge

 
This documentary about Traudl Junge and her working relationship with Adolf Hitler has been given a simple but adequate presentation for its North American release on DVD. Blind Spot: Hitler's Secretary (aka Im Toten Winkel: Hitlers Sekretarin) has been transferred to disc in the full-frame aspect ratio of 1.33:1, and the audio is mastered in Dolby

Overview

This documentary about Traudl Junge and her working relationship with Adolf Hitler has been given a simple but adequate presentation for its North American release on DVD. Blind Spot: Hitler's Secretary (aka Im Toten Winkel: Hitlers Sekretarin) has been transferred to disc in the full-frame aspect ratio of 1.33:1, and the audio is mastered in Dolby Digital Mono. The film is in German, with optional subtitles in English, French, and Spanish. The film's trailer has been included as a bonus.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Josh Ralske
Blind Spot: Hitler's Secretary is a deceptively simple documentary, and a compelling example of the form. Some may complain that the film lacks the breadth and power of such Holocaust documents as Claude Lanzmann's Shoah, which used a similarly direct, bare-bones technique in its interviews with both survivors and collaborators. But the film does illuminate its subject, which is not Hitler himself, who remains a fairly unfathomable figure, but Traudl Junge. Junge was once a naïve and optimistic young woman who accepted a job working for the Nazis more out of curiosity than ideology. The film presents her in her dotage, but her recollection of her experiences is vivid. For a while, the film just shows Junge relating her carefree earlier days working for the Nazis, and her girlish interests, and she doesn't seem especially remorseful about her past. She describes her family as "apolitical," and claims that she came to work for the Nazis through "coincidence, chance, and foolishness." She describes how she won Hitler over during her initial interview with him by making him laugh. But filmmakers Andre Heller and Othmar Schmiderer cannily convey the extent of Junge's remorse by sporadically cutting to a shot of her watching her own testimony as it unfolds. She watches herself in a tremulous and agitated state, mouthing her words back as she listens to them, interrupting with corrections and clarifications. It's clear that she's still wrestling demons. The information she provides is sometimes limited to banal details about Hitler's eating habits and the like, but her distinct point-of-view is critical to improving our understanding of the events she witnessed.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/28/2003
UPC:
0043396002678
Original Release:
2002
Rating:
PG
Source:
Sony Pictures
Region Code:
1
Sound:
[Dolby Digital]
Time:
1:27:00

Special Features

[None specified]

Cast & Crew

Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Start [3:11]
2. Traudl Junge [2:22]
3. "He Was an Absolute Criminal" [:51]
4. Hitler as a Father Figure [1:29]
5. Junge Family Principles [1:08]
6. Chance and Foolishness [1:13]
7. A Passion for Dancing [1:44]
8. The Typing Competition [1:08]
9. Wolf's Lair [1:51]
10. Trial Dictation [2:26]
11. Hitler's New Secretary [2:14]
12. Meals with the Fuhrer [1:13]
13. Blind Spot [1:20]
14. Public vs. Private Speech Habits [:46]
15. An Unhealthy Way of Life [2:21]
16. Blondie [2:35]
17. The Issue of Jews [1:36]
18. Frau von Schirach [3:07]
19. The Subject of Women [2:23]
20. July 20, 1944 [6:06]
21. A Huge Panic & Rage [1:54]
22. "He Had Lost Touch with Reality" [1:42]
23. A General Policy of Denial [1:14]
24. Dead Flowers [:19]
25. April 22, 1945 [6:21]
26. April 24, 1945 [3:30]
27. The Final Days [26:42]
28. "It's No Excuse to Be Young" [3:54]

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Blind Spot: Hitler's Secretary 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Historical account, in the first person, by one of Hitler's personal secretaries reveals how easily people can fool themselves into believing in and blindly following the tryanny and treachery of cruel dictators. Denial doesn't change one thing about reality, and this DVD clearly exposes this truth! Watching this woman's first-hand account of being Hitler's secretary will make you look at THE WAY YOU ARE RAISING YOUR CHILDREN--how you are developing their self-esteem, sense of automony, critical thinking habits, and ability to AVOID being fooled by 'slick' talkers and con-artists.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Blind Spot (Im toten Winkel) is technically a disappointing film--it utilizies one fixed camera and a sometimes iffy mike to record a single woman sitting in chair over two days of recording--but that woman was one of Hitler's personal secretaries. Traudel H. was a then teenaged secretary whose stenographic skills landed her a job at the Führer's headquarters as one of a half-dozen or so female secretaries hand-picked to serve Hitler and be on call around-the-clock. Because Hitler was adverse to taking meals with government officials and having to talk shop, he usually invited his secretaries to join him for lunch, which allowed them to observe Hitler in a far more informal and agreeable manner than for anyone else. As the Third Reich began to collapse and the Russians neared Hitler's headquarters, the gloom and impending doom surrounded the staff but no one dared, or indeed wanted, to leave, all choosing to remain true to their leader to the end. The same holds true for Traudel, who ends up being one of the last people to see Hitler and Eva Braun before they retire to their apartment and commit suicide. All of this comes from the first-person recollections of Traudel, who managed to escape Berlin and her questionable past to spend the rest of her adult life in obscurity. However, reaching her old age and facing increasing illness, she decided to contact André Heller, the famous Viennese author, director and performer, and ask him to record her recollection of working for Hitler and seeing him more as a man than an icon. While the format Heller has chosen is dull, her delivery of events and recollections is electrifying, all the more so when you realize she was truly one of the last living witnesses to the demise of Hitler and the rulers of the Third Reich. She herself has died since the making of this film, and she has done history and herself a service by making sure she left a permanent record behind. For anyone interested in the life of Adolf Hitler and a first-person account of his last days, this film is invaluable and an absolute must-see.
concon More than 1 year ago
Hitler's life from the inside..from a woman who lived near him and saw it all....fascinating and compelling....hard to put down, hard to look away..
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago