Blind Spot: Hitler's Secretary

( 5 )

Overview

Blind Spot: Hitler's Secretary is a feature-length interview with 81-year-old Austrian Traudl Junge, who served as Hitler's personal secretary from 1942 to 1945, when she was in her early twenties. She saw Hitler in his everyday life, right up until his final days, and she witnessed, firsthand, the collapse of the Nazi regime. After the war, Junge was "de-Nazified" by Allied forces as part of a program of amnesty for young people. She remained silent about her experiences for nearly 60 years, until she agreed to ...
See more details below
This VHS is Not Available through BN.com

Overview

Blind Spot: Hitler's Secretary is a feature-length interview with 81-year-old Austrian Traudl Junge, who served as Hitler's personal secretary from 1942 to 1945, when she was in her early twenties. She saw Hitler in his everyday life, right up until his final days, and she witnessed, firsthand, the collapse of the Nazi regime. After the war, Junge was "de-Nazified" by Allied forces as part of a program of amnesty for young people. She remained silent about her experiences for nearly 60 years, until she agreed to be interviewed by artist Andre Heller, whose own Jewish father escaped Austria as the Nazis came to power. Heller and documentarian Othmar Schmiderer edited ten hours of interview footage into the 90-minute film, which uses no archival footage, photos, or background music. It's just Junge describing her experiences on camera and occasionally watching the video playback of herself as she describes those experiences. Junge denies any real knowledge or understanding of what the Nazis were doing while she worked for them. She discusses how she was taken in by Hitler, who seemed fatherly and kind. She describes his personality. She goes into harrowing detail about the last days in the bunker. At times, she seems overwhelmed by her sense of shame at her own ignorance and naïveté. Presumably unburdened after decades of guilt, Junge passed away just hours after Blind Spot was shown at the 2002 Berlin Film Festival, where it won the Panorama Audience Prize. The film was also shown at the 2002 Toronto Film Festival, and the 2002 New York Film Festival.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Josh Ralske
Blind Spot: Hitler's Secretary is a deceptively simple documentary, and a compelling example of the form. Some may complain that the film lacks the breadth and power of such Holocaust documents as Claude Lanzmann's Shoah, which used a similarly direct, bare-bones technique in its interviews with both survivors and collaborators. But the film does illuminate its subject, which is not Hitler himself, who remains a fairly unfathomable figure, but Traudl Junge. Junge was once a naïve and optimistic young woman who accepted a job working for the Nazis more out of curiosity than ideology. The film presents her in her dotage, but her recollection of her experiences is vivid. For a while, the film just shows Junge relating her carefree earlier days working for the Nazis, and her girlish interests, and she doesn't seem especially remorseful about her past. She describes her family as "apolitical," and claims that she came to work for the Nazis through "coincidence, chance, and foolishness." She describes how she won Hitler over during her initial interview with him by making him laugh. But filmmakers Andre Heller and Othmar Schmiderer cannily convey the extent of Junge's remorse by sporadically cutting to a shot of her watching her own testimony as it unfolds. She watches herself in a tremulous and agitated state, mouthing her words back as she listens to them, interrupting with corrections and clarifications. It's clear that she's still wrestling demons. The information she provides is sometimes limited to banal details about Hitler's eating habits and the like, but her distinct point-of-view is critical to improving our understanding of the events she witnessed.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 10/28/2003
  • UPC: 043396002708
  • Original Release: 2002
  • Rating:

  • Source: Sony Pictures
  • Format: VHS

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Traudl Junge Participant
Technical Credits
Andre Heller Director
Othmar Schmiderer Director, Cinematographer, Sound/Sound Designer
Daniel Krausz Producer
Danny Kravsz Producer
Daniel Pohacker Editor
Kurt Stocker Producer
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Raise Your Children to NOT be fooled by Others

    Historical account, in the first person, by one of Hitler's personal secretaries reveals how easily people can fool themselves into believing in and blindly following the tryanny and treachery of cruel dictators. Denial doesn't change one thing about reality, and this DVD clearly exposes this truth! Watching this woman's first-hand account of being Hitler's secretary will make you look at THE WAY YOU ARE RAISING YOUR CHILDREN--how you are developing their self-esteem, sense of automony, critical thinking habits, and ability to AVOID being fooled by 'slick' talkers and con-artists.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    One of the last eye witnesses to Hitler up close and personal

    Blind Spot (Im toten Winkel) is technically a disappointing film--it utilizies one fixed camera and a sometimes iffy mike to record a single woman sitting in chair over two days of recording--but that woman was one of Hitler's personal secretaries. Traudel H. was a then teenaged secretary whose stenographic skills landed her a job at the Führer's headquarters as one of a half-dozen or so female secretaries hand-picked to serve Hitler and be on call around-the-clock. Because Hitler was adverse to taking meals with government officials and having to talk shop, he usually invited his secretaries to join him for lunch, which allowed them to observe Hitler in a far more informal and agreeable manner than for anyone else. As the Third Reich began to collapse and the Russians neared Hitler's headquarters, the gloom and impending doom surrounded the staff but no one dared, or indeed wanted, to leave, all choosing to remain true to their leader to the end. The same holds true for Traudel, who ends up being one of the last people to see Hitler and Eva Braun before they retire to their apartment and commit suicide. All of this comes from the first-person recollections of Traudel, who managed to escape Berlin and her questionable past to spend the rest of her adult life in obscurity. However, reaching her old age and facing increasing illness, she decided to contact André Heller, the famous Viennese author, director and performer, and ask him to record her recollection of working for Hitler and seeing him more as a man than an icon. While the format Heller has chosen is dull, her delivery of events and recollections is electrifying, all the more so when you realize she was truly one of the last living witnesses to the demise of Hitler and the rulers of the Third Reich. She herself has died since the making of this film, and she has done history and herself a service by making sure she left a permanent record behind. For anyone interested in the life of Adolf Hitler and a first-person account of his last days, this film is invaluable and an absolute must-see.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A peek inside Hitler's life

    Hitler's life from the inside..from a woman who lived near him and saw it all....fascinating and compelling....hard to put down, hard to look away..

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews