Blue Steel

Overview

Megan Turner Jamie Lee Curtis is a rookie cop who witnesses a robbery in progress on her first night on the job. With her more experienced partner using the men's room, Megan decides to take action on her own. She creeps into the supermarket where a man Tom Sizemore in a small role is holding the clerk at gunpoint. Megan gets close enough to shoot the gunman, and calls out for him to drop his weapon. He spins the gun toward her, and she unloads her service revolver into his chest. His gun goes flying, and a ...
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Overview

Megan Turner Jamie Lee Curtis is a rookie cop who witnesses a robbery in progress on her first night on the job. With her more experienced partner using the men's room, Megan decides to take action on her own. She creeps into the supermarket where a man Tom Sizemore in a small role is holding the clerk at gunpoint. Megan gets close enough to shoot the gunman, and calls out for him to drop his weapon. He spins the gun toward her, and she unloads her service revolver into his chest. His gun goes flying, and a bystander, Eugene Hunt Ron Silver, surreptitiously picks it up and takes it home. Megan's superiors, unable to confirm that the man she shot was armed, suspend her. Eugene, a wealthy commodities broker, becomes obsessed with Megan. He sets up an "accidental" meeting between them and begins dating her, romancing her with fancy restaurants and helicopter rides over Manhattan. He also carves her name into the bullets he uses to gun down strangers in the street. A tough homicide detective, Nick Mann Clancy Brown of The Shawshank Redemption, gets Megan's gun and badge back so she can help him track down the psycho killer. Eventually, Megan realizes that Eugene is the killer, but he uses his money and influence to elude the law, and he starts coming after Megan's friends and family. Megan's determination to bring Eugene to justice quickly becomes a very personal obsession. This intense cop drama, Blue Steel, was director Kathryn Bigelow's major studio follow-up to her well-received indie vampire flick, Near Dark. Bigelow co-wrote both films with Eric Red The Hitcher.
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Josh Ralske
Blue Steel is an over-the-top police action-psychodrama with a decidedly feminist bent. The film manages to entertain, despite frequent lapses into silliness. Jamie Lee Curtis does excellent work as Megan Turner, a hardnosed rookie cop who resents the way people respond to her chosen line of work. Frequently asked why she decided to join the force, Megan resorts to sarcasm. "Ever since I was a kid," she tells her partner, "I wanted to shoot people." "I like to slam peoples' heads up against walls," she tells an obnoxious prospective suitor. If Megan's performance in the field shows her as courageous, and an excellent shot, her answers to these questions reveal just how brittle she is. Curtis does a good job of portraying both her strength and her underlying vulnerability. Eugene, the unhinged "master of the universe" portrayed by Ron Silver, predates the Patrick Bateman character in American Psycho, and seems to represent the same kind of consumerism gone amok. But Bateman is a far more interesting character. Silver's performance is so two-dimensionally villainous and transparently creepy that it's a wonder Megan doesn't just arrest him the moment she sees him. Then maybe we'd get to find out more about the family and friends he threatens, all played by fine actors, who are essentially treated as props in the film. The film gets very silly at times, particularly during the unnaturally attenuated final showdown between Megan and Eugene, but it's still enjoyable. The film critiques culture's obsession with guns, as the fascinating opening credit sequence lovingly lingers on close-ups of the shiny surface of Megan's service revolver. Writer/director Kathryn Bigelow also manages to make trenchant points about the barriers faced by women working in a predominantly male profession, a subject she is no doubt intimately familiar with.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 2/6/1996
  • UPC: 027616188533
  • Original Release: 1990
  • Rating:

  • Source: Mgm (Video & Dvd)
  • Format: VHS

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Jamie Lee Curtis Megan Turner
Ron Silver Eugene Hunt
Clancy Brown Nick Mann
Elizabeth Peña Tracy Perez
Louise Fletcher Shirley Turner
Philip Bosco Frank Turner
L. Peter Callender Reporter
Harley Flanagan
Markus Flanagan Husband
Skipp Lynch Instructor
William Jay Marshall Hood
Michael Philip del Rio John Perez
Kevin Dunn Assistant Chief Stanley Hoyt
Richard Jenkins Attorney Mel Dawson
Mary Mara Wife
Mike Hodge Police Commissioner
Mike Starr Superintendent
Chris Walker Officer Jeff Travers
Tom Sizemore Wool Cap
David Ilku Counterman
Andrew Hubatsek Cashier
Joe Jamrog Doorman
Matt Craven Howard
Reginald Wells TV Announcer #1
Heidi Kempf TV Announcer
Toni Darling Prostitute
James Shannon Maitre D'Hotel
Thomas Dorff Businessman Victim
William Wise Internal Affairs Man
Lauren Tom Reporter
Faith Geer Lady Bum
Doug Barron Reporter #1
Carol Schneider Reporter #2
Becky Gelke Nurse #1
Frank Girardeau Uniform Cop
Larry Silvestri Precinct Cop
Bellina Logan Rookie No. 1
Ralph Nieves Homicide Detective
James Drescher Punk
John Capodice Trial Commissioner
Sam Coppola PBA Representative
Al Cerullo Helicopter Pilot
Technical Credits
Kathryn Bigelow Director, Screenwriter
Risa Bramon Casting
Toby Corbett Production Designer
Brad Fiedel Score Composer
Michael Flynn Associate Producer
Jery Hewitt Stunts
Billy Hopkins Casting
Lawrence Kasanoff Executive Producer
Susan Kaufman Set Decoration/Design
Steve Kirshoff Special Effects
Amir Mokri Cinematographer
Oliver Stone Co-producer
Lee Percy Editor
Edward R. Pressman Co-producer
Michael Rauch Co-producer
Eric Red Screenwriter
Richard Shissler Costumes/Costume Designer
Toni Trimble Makeup
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Blue Steel an overlooked gem...

    A 1990 thriller from veteran action helmer Kathryn Bigelow, Blue Steel is point blank entertaining.

    Jamie Lee Curtis is an NYC rookie cop who unwittingly falls for a crazed futures trader, Ron Silver, who's responsible for a series of shooting deaths throughout the Big Apple. The creepy part is the stock broker's using a gun stolen from a robbery that the rookie cop helped thwart. Worse, he's become obsessed with her and carves her name lovingly into the bullets he's emptying into unsuspecting New Yorkers. This puts her under investigation from the police force, well-represented by a gruff detective, Clancy Brown (in a rare hero's role).

    The film's cinematography and editing are first rate, while the score by Brad Fidel (The Terminator and Terminator 2: Judgement Day) is moody and atmospheric. Bigelow and co-writer Eric Red (The Hitcher) worked together on the moody vampire western Near Dark and they achieve a similarly violent and menacing tone here.

    This is an ideal date-night thriller that still holds up nearly 20 years later. Sit back and relax... you're in for a few good thrills.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews