Brady Bunch: Complete Third Season

Brady Bunch: Complete Third Season

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Season 3 of The Brady Bunch is pretty much the same as seasons one and two, not that anyone is complaining. Once again, the diverse members of the Brady clan, brought together two seasons earlier by the wedding of widow Carol Martin (Florence Henderson) and widower Mike Brady (Robert Reed), doSee more details below

Overview

Season 3 of The Brady Bunch is pretty much the same as seasons one and two, not that anyone is complaining. Once again, the diverse members of the Brady clan, brought together two seasons earlier by the wedding of widow Carol Martin (Florence Henderson) and widower Mike Brady (Robert Reed), do their darnedest to live harmoniously under the same suburban roof, with sensible housekeeper Alice (Ann B. Davis) acting as sidelines observer and occasional plot motivator. The season opens with the series' first multi-episode story, in which the Bradys embark upon a memorable trip to the Grand Canyon -- and along the way are detained by an eccentric old prospector played by Jim Backus, here working for producer Sherwood Schwartz for the first time since the cancellation of Gilligan's Island. Subsequent episodes worth mentioning include "The Wheeler Dealer, in which oldest son Greg Brady (Barry Williams) buys his first car; "The Personality Kid," which finds middle son Peter (Christopher Knight) adopting a zany new personality and living to regret it (remember the "Porkchops and Applesauce" scene?); "Juliet Is the Sun," wherein oldest daughter Marcia (Maureen McCormick) develops a swelled head the size of Massachusetts when she lands the lead in her school play; "Her Sister's Shadow," an exercise in frustration for middle daughter Jan (Eve Plumb), who for the first -- and, astonishingly the last -- time utters the immortal rant "Marcia, Marcia, Marcia!"; "Getting Davy Jones," the celebrated episode featuring the titular ex-Monkee; "The Teeter-Totter Caper," a potent warning against incipient juvenile delinquency spotlighting youngest Brady kids Bobby (Mike Lookinland) and Cindy (Susan Olsen); and "Sergeant Emma," in which series regular Ann B. Davis delivers a bravura performance in the dual role of housekeeper Alice and her martinet cousin Emma.

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Donald Liebenson
When oldest son Greg prepares to plunk down a hard-earned $100 on a car in this third season’s fifth episode, "The Wheeler Dealer," his dad, Mike, sagely advises him, "Caveat emptor." This being a ‘70s sitcom, you know the car is doomed. No such buyer's advisory is necessary for this four-disc set. No Brady buff (Bunch-head?) could pass on a set that includes "Getting Davy Jones," the landmark outing in which Marcia pledges to get the former Monkees singer to perform at her school prom. And the hits just keep on coming for this generation-defining guilty pleasure. In "Her Sister's Shadow," middle daughter Jan utters her immortal lament, "Marcia, Marcia, Marcia." In "The Wallflower Kid," Peter gets his own catchphrase, courtesy of Humphrey Bogart: "Porkchops and applesauce." The season begins auspiciously with the Bradys at the Grand Canyon, for a three-parter that anticipates their Hawaiian adventure in Season 4. Several venerable character actors grace this season, including Jim Backus as a grizzled prospector in "Ghost Town U.S.A." and Imogene Coca as "Jan's Aunt Jenny," whose childhood resemblance to Jan -- and homely senior appearance -- give Jan pause. Paul "Tigger" Winchell makes an impression as a director who loses his cool when he casts the Bradys in a commercial in "And Now a Word from Our Sponsor." "The Fender Benders" features Jackie "Uncle Fester" Coogan as an unscrupulous motorist who takes the Bradys to court. And, of course, it wouldn’t be a Bunch without Ann B. Davis, who gets a juicy role in "Sergeant Emma" as Alice's cousin, a retired drill-team instructor who runs the Bradys ragged while Alice is on vacation. This is quintessential comfort television from the days before irony, and never is that more evident than in the episode "Dough-Re Mi": When the family attempts to record a song entitled "We Can Make the World a Whole Lot Brighter," it’s pure, squeaky-clean '70s nostalgia.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/13/2005
UPC:
0097360453843
Rating:
NR
Source:
Paramount
Region Code:
1
Time:
9:54:00

Special Features

Closed Caption; Full-screen format; Dolby Digital English Mono

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