Broken Blossoms

( 3 )

Overview

Considered one of D.W. Griffith's best films, the silent Broken Blossoms comes to DVD with a standard full-frame transfer that preserves the original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.33:1. Supplemental materials include a filmed introduction from lead actress Lillian Gish, D.W. Griffith revealing his opinions on working with different actresses, and a recording of the 1919 song "Broken Blossoms." This is an excellent disc for anyone with an interest in the earliest days of film. ...
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Overview

Considered one of D.W. Griffith's best films, the silent Broken Blossoms comes to DVD with a standard full-frame transfer that preserves the original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.33:1. Supplemental materials include a filmed introduction from lead actress Lillian Gish, D.W. Griffith revealing his opinions on working with different actresses, and a recording of the 1919 song "Broken Blossoms." This is an excellent disc for anyone with an interest in the earliest days of film.
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Special Features

Filmed introduction by Lillian Gish including excerpts from Gish's film Romola (1925 MGM); The complete text of Thomas Burke's original story; A recording of the 1919 song "Broken Blossoms" ; D.W. Griffith on leading ladies; About the score
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Michael Hastings
Despite the great expense taken to recreate its London Limehouse-district setting, Broken Blossoms is one of D.W. Griffith's most intimate films, and some critics consider it his masterpiece. The director used his vast soundstage to tell the story of a young woman (Lillian Gish) whose love for a spiritual Chinese man (Richard Barthelmess) is thwarted by her abusive boxer father (Donald Crisp); the studio deemed the results too grim to be commercial, and Griffith was forced to buy Blossoms back and release it himself. The film is literally darker than anything the director had previously attempted: the controlled, non-location shoot allowed him to be more expressive with low light and shadow. In a pre-screening, the projectionist accidentally left on one of the theater's colored house lights, and Griffith liked the effect so much that he applied colored tints to subsequent prints. Aside from its technical achievements, Blossoms also features some of Gish's most evocative work. The actress' skills of gesture and pantomime are at their height, and her delicate, fragile performance deflects some of the attention away from Griffith's typically charismatic villain.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 12/10/2002
  • UPC: 738329019624
  • Original Release: 1919
  • Rating:

  • Source: Kino Video
  • Aspect Ratio: Pre-1954 Standard (1.33.1)
  • Time: 1:30:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 56,402

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Lillian Gish Lucy Burrows
Richard Barthelmess Cheng Haun, the Yellow Man
Donald Crisp Battling Burrows
Edward Peil Sr. Evil Eye
Arthur Howard Burrow's Manager
George Andre Beranger The Spying One
Ernest Butterworth Sr.
Wilbur Higby London Policeman
Kid McCoy A Prizefighter
George Nichols London Policeman
Karla Schramm
Technical Credits
D.W. Griffith Director, Score Composer, Producer, Screenwriter
Billy Bitzer Cinematographer
Karl Brown Cinematographer
Louis F. Gottschalk Score Composer
Hendrik Sartov Cinematographer, Special Effects
James Smith Editor
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Scene Index

Side #1 --
1. Opening Titles [9:40]
2. Sordid Realities [4:24]
3. Battling [3:25]
4. The Girl [10:22]
5. The Shopping Trip [9:55]
6. The Usual Rage [6:30]
7. A Fateful Collapse [4:16]
8. Waking in Heaven [6:40]
9. Word Travels [12:24]
10. The Lowering Storm [6:27]
11. Lucy's Homecoming [9:39]
12. Sanctuary [5:29]
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Menu

Side #1 --
   Feature Start
   Chapter Selection
   Special Features
      Introduction by Lillian Gish
      "The Chink & the Child" (The Complete Text by Thomas Burke)
      About the Score
      "Broken Blossoms" the Song
         Play Song
      D.W. Griffith on Leading Ladies
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Griffith's greatest film?

    This is a far more personal film than Birth of A Nation or Intolerance; Broken Blossoms only benefits from the more intimate scope. Lillian Gish is absolutely heartbreaking, and Richard Barthelmess conveys a restrained longing in a far more subtle manner than today's actors could ever dream of. Beware though: this version has a modern-sounding score and no packaging extras. Look closely at the Image edition before making your choice.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    This is breath taking.

    I Was so moved by This movie.I cryed . I love Lillian gish . This is lovely and pure . what love should be and not be.I was so happy she found what love was about.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A Must See!

    One of the BEST movies I have ever seen. Lillian Gish plays the unloved child of a prize fighter who treats her like a slave and abuses her endlessly. She finally finds gentleness in a Chinese shop owner. Look for the closet scene( Lillian actually passed out after filming that paticular scene). The movie is a little slow in the beginning, but makes up for it in intensity later on.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews