Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

4.3 21
Director: George Roy Hill

Cast: George Roy Hill, Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Katharine Ross

     
 

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Opening with a silent "movie" of Butch Cassidy's Hole in the Wall Gang, George Roy Hill's comically elegiac Western chronicles the mostly true tale of the outlaws' last months. Witty pals Butch (Paul Newman) and Sundance (Robert Redford) join the Gang in successfully robbing yet another train with their trademark non-lethal style. After the pair rests at the home of

Overview

Opening with a silent "movie" of Butch Cassidy's Hole in the Wall Gang, George Roy Hill's comically elegiac Western chronicles the mostly true tale of the outlaws' last months. Witty pals Butch (Paul Newman) and Sundance (Robert Redford) join the Gang in successfully robbing yet another train with their trademark non-lethal style. After the pair rests at the home of Sundance's schoolmarm girlfriend, Etta (Katharine Ross), the Gang robs the same train, but this time, the railroad boss has hired the best trackers in the business to foil the crime. After being tailed over rocks and a river gorge by guys that they can barely identify save for a white hat, Butch and Sundance decide that maybe it's time to try their luck in Bolivia. Taking Etta with them, they live high on ill-gotten Bolivian gains, but Etta leaves after their white-hatted nemesis portentously arrives. Their luck running out, Butch and Sundance are soon holed up in a barn surrounded by scores of Bolivian soldiers who are waiting for the pair to make one last run for it.

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Ed Hulse
Two of the Wild West’s most notorious outlaws were effectively whitewashed in this lighthearted romp, a box-office champion and multiple Oscar winner that marked the first teaming of superstars Paul Newman and Robert Redford. Newman stars as Butch, the quick-witted leader of Old Wyoming’s Hole-in-the-Wall Gang, while Redford portrays the Sundance Kid, a fast-draw artist who serves as Cassidy’s right-hand man but also rivals him for the affections of comely Katharine Ross. Finally driven from Wyoming by indefatigable pursuers, the pair flee to Bolivia in an attempt to begin their crime careers anew. The most successful western ever made at the time of its 1969 theatrical release, this breezy star vehicle either avoided or mocked cowboy-movie clichés; it served up equal portions of romance, comedy, and adventure to savvy Vietnam-era audiences weary of hackneyed horse operas. (Additionally, the film introduced the decidedly nonwestern, Oscar-winning song, "Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head.") William Goldman’s clever screenplay teems with snappy dialogue, and the direction by George Roy Hill (who later reunited with the star duo to make The Sting) maintains a lively pace. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid wasn’t the first revisionist western, but it was in the forefront of what became a systematic, irreverent, and highly entertaining deconstruction of cinema’s most venerable genre. The DVD Special Edition features a 45-minute documentary on the film's making, plus commentary by director Hill and cinematographer Conrad Hall, interviews with other members of the cast and production team, and the original theatrical trailer.
All Movie Guide - Lucia Bozzola
Released the same year as The Wild Bunch, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid covered similar territory about the end of Western myths, but it expressed its revisionism with tongue firmly in cheek rather than with the brutal violence of Sam Peckinpah's offering. Butch and Sundance never lose their gift for one-liners, even when they have to jump off that gorge; George Roy Hill and screenwriter William Goldman send up the image of outlaws heading south of the border with bank robberies conducted in broken Spanish from crib notes. Still, violence impinges on Butch's and Sundance's world, intimating the fate that modernity held for charming bandits who cannot master a horse-replacing bicycle. The jocularly clear-eyed approach to the pair's exploits, combined with the chemistry between Paul Newman and relative newcomer Robert Redford, vastly appealed to audiences; Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid became the most popular film of 1969 and won several Oscars, including one for Goldman's script. Like Bonnie and Clyde in 1967, glamorous outlaws Butch and Sundance were in tune with the late-'60s counterculture, but the movie's humor -- and its Oscar-winning Burt Bacharach/Hal David song "Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head" -- softened the revisionist blows amid impending tragedy.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/22/1995
UPC:
0086162869235
Original Release:
1969
Source:
20th Century Fox

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Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
this is an excellent movie. Paul Newman, Robert Redford, and Katharine Ross make a great team. if you like western movies then youll love this movie.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hollywood doesn't make movies like this anymore. You really grow to love the characters in this movie. The adventure in this movie is why kids grow up wanting to be cowboys. Its exciting, entertaining, suspenseful and lighthearted fun. I saw this movie for the first time on AMC and rushed out to buy it the next day. This was the most fun I ever had watching a Western.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One of a handful of truly great movies, such as Casablanca or Gone With The Wind, where it all comes together -- characters, plot, script, chemistry. An action-packed romantic Western...and did you notice the cast?
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one of those movies that you never forget about after watching. I have not seen this movie in 10 years, but yet I look for the soundtrack and songs all the time, but of course never purchase. I will have to get this soon to enjoy with my family.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A wonderful film. A must have for anyone who loves a Western.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I saw this movie when it first came out and have since watched it at least a dozen times. Not quite your usual western ( no John Wayne ) there was plenty of action and humor. The chemistry between these two actors was obvious and added and draws the viewer into the movie. The ending came too soon, but true to most westerns, they went out fighting. After the death of Paul Newman, I had to buy the DVD, as such movies may not come again, although they're getting better.
photoprofessor1 More than 1 year ago
Just a great film, in so many ways.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Butch Cassidy and Sundace are 2 of the most likable outlaws.Butch and Sundance are good friends and though they have their diferences they still come out on top. This movie draws you in and you don't want to leave. The ending is very powerful and a bit sad. I highly recomend it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am a proud owner of this film. I am proud I saw this film about 7 times now so far. This is a great entertainment. You got two great looking guys, who happen to be villians, but you would want to say ''Yeah, so what?''. Paul Newman shined like sun with his beautiful blue eyes. Robert Redford, so quick and terse, makes you feel going like ''Wow!''. I'll bet by the end of the film, you will say you want to be like Sundance Kid, going on how impressive you can draw as fast as Sundance Kid. Excellent Documentary in the end of the film, outlining the points of the film, especially the use of gun-play to keep it real, esp. the loading of the gun. Very sad note that George Roy Hill died last December. This is a remarkable job George Roy Hill have done, gracing the art of filmmaking. You can see it through the use of camera, motion, and colors. This is actually one the finest and most enjoyable western films I have ever seen, easily proclaiming this film to be one of the great arts. There are many sequences in this film I always think about such as one part when the card player goes 'Hey kid how just good are you?'' Bang bang bang bang!, the bicycle ride singing raindrops falling' by Burt Bacharach, the fear on their eyes going ''who are these guys?'', and finally, never to omit, the great ending that will stand the test of time as being the most sublime way to die. I will tell you again...watch this film, I will guarantee you that you will fall in love with this film.
Guest More than 1 year ago
An amazing western movie. Absolutely terrific filmmaking. Robert Redford is so dazzling that he can make the audience to go wild over him. Having Paul Newman in the film gives a comic aspect that the movie is never dull. Katherine Ross is a beautiful actress. What an amazing shot of the introduction. Just following parts. Never the whole picture. So focused. Following the parts describes how a masterpiece of the film is. great color use. Excellent use of shadows. The ''How good are you?'' is an instant classic. I loved the special feature of the film where George Roy Hill does his narrative on how he made the film in a year and 3 months. he took the chance to caption the segment. That is rare since most movies seldom do this. As a deaf viewer, I am at most respect for him. He spoke of many interesting thing. George Roy Hill is an artist and has a great sense of humor. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid is a mind-blowing film that has to be studied by filmmakers all around, who want to make great classics.
JeffreyMO More than 1 year ago
This movie might have been a great accomplishment for Robert Redford but it really bored me. It was very slow and not a lot said. For the time period it was shot, it was okay, kind of like the series 'Chips' with Erik Estrada.