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Cat Women of the Moon
     

Cat Women of the Moon

5.0 1
Director: Arthur D. Hilton, Sonny Tufts, Victor Jory, Marie Windsor

Cast: Arthur D. Hilton, Sonny Tufts, Victor Jory, Marie Windsor

 
Arthur Hilton's 1953 Cat-Women of the Moon is arguably the worst of the screen's space-travel stories of the early '50s, though some of the actors in it tried hard to make it better than it is. Sonny Tufts, a failed leading man of the 1940s, is nominally the star, but he looks rather pathetic through most of this film. The movie is actually carried by the

Overview

Arthur Hilton's 1953 Cat-Women of the Moon is arguably the worst of the screen's space-travel stories of the early '50s, though some of the actors in it tried hard to make it better than it is. Sonny Tufts, a failed leading man of the 1940s, is nominally the star, but he looks rather pathetic through most of this film. The movie is actually carried by the excellent Victor Jory as the co-pilot, and to a lesser degree, by Marie Windsor and Douglas Fowley (who had played a major role in Singin' in the Rain the previous year) as the conniving member of the crew who comes to no good end. Not even Laurence Olivier and Dame Judith Anderson, however, could carry the weight of a space-travel story in which the crew sits on ordinary office desk chairs (on casters) and stores their gear in gym lockers in the crew area. The lunar landscape paintings are good enough, but they're about the only special effects that are special in any way in this delightful mess of a movie, which was remade (in cheesy-looking color) as Amazon Women on the Moon in the Universal feature of that title. Cat-Women of the Moon, incidentally, was remade as the even cheaper but funnier Missile to the Moon in 1958, which is also available from Image Entertainment. The DVD is transferred off of extraordinarily sharp film elements. Alas, the movie doesn't seem to exist intact in 3-D, the way it was originally released, so we have to content ourselves with the 2-D version. It's a complete hoot, made even funnier by the fact that the five-day shooting schedule didn't allow time to get the entire script on film -- so the makers simply tore out the pages. The clarity merely enhances the cheesiness of most of the special effects (apart from those backdrops by Chesley Bonestell); it also gives about the best showcase ever to the score, written by a young Elmer Bernstein -- not that it bears any resemblance to his more successful and famous work of the late '50s. The movie is divided into a dozen chapters, and the original trailer -- which is pretty funny in its own terms -- is included as a bonus. The menu pops up automatically on start-up.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/13/2001
UPC:
0014381860320
Original Release:
1953
Rating:
NR
Source:
Image Entertainment
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[B&W]
Sound:
[monaural]
Time:
1:04:00

Special Features

Theatrical trailer

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Sonny Tufts Laird Grainger
Victor Jory Kip Reissner, co-pilot
Marie Windsor Helen Salinger, navigator
Carol Brewster Alpha
Douglas Fowley Walt Willis
Susan Morrow Lambda
William Phipps Douglas Smith
Suzanne Alexander Zeta
Judy Walsh Cat-Woman
Ellye Marshall Cat-Woman
Roxann Delman Cat-Woman
Bette Arlen Actor

Technical Credits
Arthur D. Hilton Director
C. Fay Babcock Set Decoration/Design
Elmer Bernstein Score Composer
John A. Bushelman Editor
William Glasgow Production Designer
Roy Hamilton Screenwriter
Jack R. Rabin Original Story,Producer,Special Effects
Harry Thomas Makeup
Wm. Whitley Cinematographer
Al Zimbalist Producer,Special Effects

Scene Index

Select The Chapter.
0. Select The Chapter.
1. Main Title; Moon Rocket 4. [12:02]
2. The Dark Side. [4:24]
3. An Exploratory Tour. [5:38]
4. The Cave. [3:56]
5. Lunar Spiders. [5:29]
6. Cat-Women. [4:14]
7. One of Us. [2:53]
8. To Serve Man. [11:17]
9. Danger and Death. [6:32]
10. Lambda's Threat. [1:31]
11. Escape. [4:27]
12. A Long Story. [1:10]

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Cat Women of the Moon 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What ever you decide, it is all cheese. Just like this film. Typical 50's Sci Fi genre. I loved this film! We have a crew on a rocketship heading towards the moon. Unbeknownst to them, they are landing on a planet inhabited by women in black leotards that have not seen men in centuries. As soon as they land and go looking around, they stumble upon the place where the Catwoman are. Helen leads doug away from the rest of the crew and stands by as one of the Cat Women jumps on his back and takes him to the ground. All the while, Helen stands there and watches and then quitely slips away. Finally Doug, who is now on his back and has this woman on top of him, yells for help. The Crew runs to the rescue. Doug claims he has no idea what attacked him. Something jumped on his back. I guess he had his eyes closed the whole time, except when he says he looked over and saw helen watching the whole thing! One thing leads to another and the Cat women plan to steal the rocketship. The plan is to lure the men with whatever, and find out how to run the thing. Walt get's off'd though. Eventually, Kip, the guy who likes to think he's in charge,(And desperately needs an NRA course in gun safety) shoots the catwomen who, with helen are trying to steal the ship. They then depart the moon. They call White Sands to tell them they are coming in. White sands replies: What, Who? Apparently it's an open frequency. Look at the props in this film: Movie reel hanging on the wall, Gym lockers in the space ship, And, Office Chiars. Only the bottom where the wheels go, are blocked to you don't see the wheels and assume they are special chairs only used on Rocket ships, in case you had any doubts. You gotta love it! Enjoy the film -Patrick psmsmallengines@hotmail.com