Cimarron

( 1 )

Overview

Cimarron was the first Western to win the Oscar for Best Picture--and, until Dances with Wolves in 1990, the only one. The film begins on April 22, 1889, the opening day of the great Oklahoma Land Rush on the Cherokee Strip. Boisterous Yancey Cravat Richard Dix is cheated out of his land claim by the devious Dixie Lee Estelle Taylor. Instead of becoming a homesteader, Cravat establishes a muckraking newspaper, and with pistols in hand he becomes a widely respected and widely feared peacekeeper. He also displays a...
See more details below
DVD (Pan & Scan)
$19.99
BN.com price
Other sellers (DVD)
  • All (8) from $13.22   
  • New (6) from $13.22   
  • Used (2) from $29.60   

Overview

Cimarron was the first Western to win the Oscar for Best Picture--and, until Dances with Wolves in 1990, the only one. The film begins on April 22, 1889, the opening day of the great Oklahoma Land Rush on the Cherokee Strip. Boisterous Yancey Cravat Richard Dix is cheated out of his land claim by the devious Dixie Lee Estelle Taylor. Instead of becoming a homesteader, Cravat establishes a muckraking newspaper, and with pistols in hand he becomes a widely respected and widely feared peacekeeper. He also displays a compassionate streak by coming to the defense of Dixie Lee, who is about to be arrested for prostitution. Cravat's insistence on sticking his nose into everyone's affairs drives a wedge between him and his young wife Sabra Irene Dunne, but she stands by him--until he deserts her and her children, ever in pursuit of new adventures. Sabra takes over the newspaper herself, and with the moral support of her best friend, Mrs. Wyatt Edna May Oliver, she creates a powerful publishing empire. Cimarron makes the mistake of placing most of the action early in the film, so that everything that follows the spectacular opening land-rush sequence may feel anti-climactic. While it's always enjoyable to watch Irene Dunne persevering through the years, it's rather wearing to sit through the overblown performance of Richard Dix, who seems to think that he can't make a point unless it's at the top of his lungs. Cimarron creaks badly when seen today, but it still outclasses the plodding 1960 remake.
Read More Show Less

Special Features

Vintage music short "The Devil's Cabaret"; Classic cartoon "Red-Headed Baby"; Subtitles: English, Français & Español (main feature; bonus material/trailer may not be subtitled)
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Hans J. Wollstein
According to Hollywood lore, Cimarron's famous Oklahoma Land Rush sequence was filmed near Bakersfield, CA, and included 47 camera operators and 5,000 dress extras. The scene, which to a modern viewer suggests some heavy borrowing from William S. Hart's similar sequence in the silent Tumbleweeds (1925), remains Cimarron's centerpiece and tends to dwarf the empire building sweep of Edna Ferber's original novel. And, to be frank, the remaining hour or so of political intrigue is rather ponderous and dull in comparison. Richard Dix and Irene Dunne grow old according to Hollywood tradition by graying slightly at the temples and the rest of the immense cast seems in awe of the entire enterprise. According to Hollywood lore, Cimarron lost money despite earning a Best Picture Academy Award and it is easy to see why. The whole enterprise seems lopsided and never recovers from that amazing land rush sequence early on in the proceedings.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 1/8/2008
  • UPC: 883929002436
  • Original Release: 1930
  • Rating:

  • Source: Warner Home Video
  • Region Code: 1
  • Presentation: Pan & Scan
  • Time: 2:03:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 63,976

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Richard Dix Yancey Cravat
Irene Dunne Sabra Cravat
Estelle Taylor Dixie Lee
Nance O'Neil Felice Venable
William Collier Jr. The Kid
Roscoe Ates Jess Rickey
George E. Stone Sol Levy
Robert McWade Louie Heffner
Edna May Oliver Mrs. Tracy Wyatt
Frank Darien Mr. Bixby
Eugene Jackson Isaiah
Dolores Brown Baby Big Elk Eldest
Gloria Vonic Baby Big Elk Youngster
Otto Hoffman Murch Rankin
William Orlamond Grat Gotch
Frank Beal Louis Venable
Nancy Dover Donna Cravat "Eldest"
Helen Parrish Donna Cravat "Younger"
Junior Johnson Cim "Younger"
Douglas Scott Cim "Youngest"
Reggie Streeter Yancey, Jr.
Ann Lee Aunt Cassandra
Tyrone Brereton Dabney Venable
Nell Craig Arminta Greenwood
Bob McKenzie Pat Leary
William P. Burt
Frederick Burt
Donald Dillaway Cim "Eldest"
Donald Dilloway Cim (older)
Stanley Fields Lon Yountis
William Janney Worker
Bob Kortman Killer
Frank O'Connor
Dennis O'Keefe Extra
Henry Roquemore Jonett Goforth
Technical Credits
Wesley Ruggles Director
William Le Baron Producer
Edward J. Cronjager Cinematographer
Howard Estabrook Screenwriter
Edna Ferber Screenwriter
Willaim Hamilton Editor
Lloyd Knechtel Special Effects
Clem Portman Sound/Sound Designer
Max Ree Art Director, Costumes/Costume Designer
Louis Sarecky Producer
Max Steiner Score Composer
Read More Show Less

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Cimarron
1. Credits and Foreword [2:51]
2. Oklahoma Land Rush [4:34]
3. Dixie Lee's Claim [1:57]
4. Bound for the Cimarron [4:08]
5. Our First Real Home [5:06]
6. Osage [4:26]
7. Chance Encounters [4:08]
8. Friendly Shooting [4:16]
9. Hanging the Shingle [2:27]
10. Death Cry [3:28]
11. Sunday Finery [4:46]
12. Gathering for Meeting [2:45]
13. Hymn and Collection [5:25]
14. Sermon Shootout [4:52]
15. Sabra's Ambitions [4:21]
16. The Kid's Last Stand [5:29]
17. Losing Isaiah [2:54]
18. You Vicious Hussy [3:53]
19. Cherokee Run Chance [4:10]
20. Discussing Yancey [4:07]
21. Back Home [4:46]
22. Dixie on Trial [5:41]
23. The Verdict [4:42]
24. Never Anybody but You [2:39]
25. Wayward Children [3:01]
26. Filthy Politics [4:10]
27. Editorial Clash [2:22]
28. Forty Years in One Place [3:05]
29. Guest of Honor [3:10]
30. Almost All the Family [5:48]
31. Old Drifter's Passing [3:10]
32. Oklahoma Pioneer [:36]
Read More Show Less

Menu

Disc #1 -- Cimarron
   Play Movie
   Scene Selections
   Special Features
      The Devil's Cabaret
      Red Headed Baby
   Languages
      Subtitles: English
      Subtitles: Français
      Subtitles: Español
      Subtitles: Off
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Epics Win

    Epics win; they almost always do. Cimarron is a mammoth movie. Hollywood had learned a lot by this point. The epic scenes of the Oklahoma Land Rush were probably the most well-executed scequences of the film. With an epic film, those scenes are really easy. It is the intimate scenes wherein the personal plot exists, that is difficult. These were rather rough and rushed. They are locked in the past theatrical style designed for "melor-drama" on the stage. Irene Dunne is by far the stand-out performance of the film. Her level of character development far exceeds that of her castmates. I would recommend this film for those who are either fans of Edna Feber's work, or those who love the history/art of the genre of film.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews