City Of Lost Children

( 22 )

Overview

Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro's visually stunning, adult fairy tale comes to startling life on DVD. The bold vision of the French duo is just as warped as it was in the cinema. The surreal, colorful imagery is served well on DVD. Much of the film is enshrouded in shadows or lit by candles, so a quality transfer was vital. Luckily, the digital transfer does not distill cinematographer Darius Khondji's magical craftsmanship. Jean-Paul Gaultier's costumes have never looked better on a TV screen. The sound is ...
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DVD (Wide Screen / Pan & Scan)
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Overview

Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro's visually stunning, adult fairy tale comes to startling life on DVD. The bold vision of the French duo is just as warped as it was in the cinema. The surreal, colorful imagery is served well on DVD. Much of the film is enshrouded in shadows or lit by candles, so a quality transfer was vital. Luckily, the digital transfer does not distill cinematographer Darius Khondji's magical craftsmanship. Jean-Paul Gaultier's costumes have never looked better on a TV screen. The sound is always crisp and clear. Barking dogs, talking brains, cackling schoolteachers, and whispering children are all perfectly mixed for maximum effect. Angelo Badalamenti's haunting score sounds superb. The DVD is packed with special features. Director Jeunet and actor Ron Perlman's running commentary provides for a touching, light-hearted look at the filmmaking process. Viewers will snicker when they hear about a dog who wouldn't take orders and why he needed a urine wrangler. The costume design gallery consists of about twenty Gaultier sketches, some of them simply detailed close-ups of the same picture. An extensive production-stills gallery presents the films' sets as realized in black-and-white sketches, and "Talent Files" provides brief biographies/filmographies of Jeunet and Caro, Perlman, Badalamenti, and Gaultier. The theatrical trailer could teach Hollywood a great deal about film promotion; it is entirely free of dialogue and more than a tiny bit spooky. A stunning film, The City of Lost Children is beautifully presented on this DVD. It's an absolutely joyful experience.
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Special Features

Interactive menus; Languages: French [original language], English, Spanish; Subtitles: English, French, Spanish; Theatrical trailer; Scene selections; Full-screen and widescreen formats
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
With The City of Lost Children, their second full-length feature, French filmmakers Jean Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro cemented their claim to a distinct authorial style. An elaborate dystopian vision with a fairy tale sensibility, The City of Lost Children imagines a resolutely sui generis world of freak-show grotesques, Dickensian orphans, and Rube Goldbergian convolutions. Revealing a bottomless capacity for invention, Jeunet and Caro tell their story with ruthless precision and flamboyance. As with their feature debut, Delicatessen, Jeunet and Caro's follow-up betrays their roots in animation. The baroque production design and darkly epic scope inspired comparisons to Terry Gilliam, Tim Burton, and Blade Runner; a less cited, but equally apt, reference point is the Coen brothers: like the Coens, Jeunet and Caro practice a cinema of consummate and self-conscious manipulation. From the eerily airless mise-en-scene to the archetypal familiarity of the characters, the filmmakers' exacting style is tightly controlled and leaves little room for spontaneity. It's a modus operandi that sparks debate: the movie received mixed reviews upon its release, with some critics accusing Jeunet and Caro of being soulless smart alecks interested only in the machinery, and not the humanity, of film. While not unfounded, the observation is also incomplete, failing to account for the signal pleasures of succumbing to the whims of master raconteurs.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 10/19/1999
  • UPC: 043396400191
  • Original Release: 1995
  • Rating:

  • Source: Sony Pictures
  • Region Code: 1
  • Aspect Ratio: Pre-1954 Standard (1.33.1), Theatre Wide-Screen (1.85.1)
  • Presentation: Wide Screen / Pan & Scan
  • Sound: Dolby Surround
  • Language: English, Français, Español
  • Time: 1:52:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 3,703

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Ron Perlman One
Daniel Emilfork Krank
Judith Vittet Miette
Dominique Pinon Clones, Diver
Jean-Claude Dreyfus Marcello the Flea-Tamer
Genevieve Brunet Octopus
Briac Barthelemy Bottle
Marc Caro Brother Ange-Joseph
Lorella Cravotta Woman at her Window
Mapi Galan Lune
Nane Germon Miette, age 82
Ticky Holgado Ex-acrobat
Cris Huerta Father Christmas
Francois Hadji Lazaro Killer
Joseph Lucien Denree
Ham-Chau Luong Tattoo Artist
Serge Merlin Cyclops' Leader
Rufus Peeler
Hong-Mai Thomas Tattoo Artist's Wife
Jean-Louis Trintignant Voice Only
Technical Credits
Marc Caro Director, Art Director, Screenwriter
Jean-Pierre Jeunet Director, Screenwriter
Gilles Adrien Screenwriter
Vincent Arnardi Musical Direction/Supervision
Angelo Badalamenti Score Composer, Songwriter
Aline Bonetto Set Decoration/Design
Pierre Excoffier Musical Direction/Supervision
Jean-Paul Gaultier Costumes/Costume Designer
Gerard Hardy Musical Direction/Supervision
Darius Khondji Cinematographer
Guillaume Laurant Screenwriter
Thierry Lebon Musical Direction/Supervision
Claudie Ossard Producer
Elias Querejeta Co-producer
Jean Rabasse Production Designer
Herve Schneid Editor
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Scene Index

Side #1 -- Widescreen
0. Scene Selections
1. Start [4:23]
2. The City [2:16]
3. Mr. One [6:14]
4. Birthday Party [2:08]
5. Making Krank Cry [2:19]
6. The Octopus [1:40]
7. The Robbery [4:25]
8. Retrieving One [2:41]
9. Informing the Octopus [6:41]
10. Cyclops Meeting [5:22]
11. Selling Information [2:31]
12. Recruiting Marcello [2:21]
13. Santa Krank [6:50]
14. Underwater Rescuer [5:10]
15. Miette & Friends [3:59]
16. Saving One [3:02]
17. One's Past [2:21]
18. Nightmares [4:44]
19. Finishing Marcello [:43]
20. Dinner Guest [2:20]
21. Sore Feet [2:12]
22. Tattoo Artist [1:53]
23. Farewell Song [2:27]
24. Chain Reaction [4:53]
25. Marcello's Revenge [10:55]
26. Miette Meets Irvin [1:25]
27. Inside the Dream [6:57]
28. Escape [9:09]
Side #2 -- Full Screen
0. Scene Selections
1. Start [4:23]
2. The City [2:16]
3. Mr. One [6:14]
4. Birthday Party [2:08]
5. Making Krank Cry [2:19]
6. The Octopus [1:40]
7. The Robbery [4:25]
8. Retrieving One [2:41]
9. Informing the Octopus [6:41]
10. Cyclops Meeting [5:22]
11. Selling Information [2:31]
12. Recruiting Marcello [2:21]
13. Santa Krank [6:50]
14. Underwater Rescuer [5:10]
15. Miette & Friends [3:59]
16. Saving One [3:02]
17. One's Past [2:21]
18. Nightmares [4:44]
19. Finishing Marcello [:43]
20. Dinner Guest [2:20]
21. Sore Feet [2:12]
22. Tattoo Artist [1:53]
23. Farewell Song [2:27]
24. Chain Reaction [4:53]
25. Marcello's Revenge [10:55]
26. Miette Meets Irvin [1:25]
27. Inside the Dream [6:57]
28. Escape [9:09]
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Menu

Side #1 -- Widescreen
   Play Movie
   Languages & Audio Set-Up
      Original French 2-Channel (Dolby Surround)
      English 2-Channel (Dolby Surround)
      Spanish (Stereo)
   Subtitles
      English
      Spanish
      French
      No Subtitles
   Special Features
      Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Ron Perlman Commentary: On
      Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Ron Perlman Commentary: Off
      Costume Design Gallery
      Production Sketch Gallery
      Talent Files
         Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Marc Caro (Directors)
         Ron Perlman
         Angelo Badalamenti (Composer)
         Jean-Paul Gaultier (Costumes)
      Theatrical Trailer
Side #2 -- Full Screen
   Play Movie
   Languages & Audio Set-Up
      Original French 2-Channel (Dolby Surround)
      English 2-Channel (Dolby Surround)
      Spanish (Stereo)
   Subtitles
      English
      Spanish
      French
      No Subtitles
   Special Features
      Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Ron Perlman Commentary: On
      Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Ron Perlman Commentary: Off
      Costume Design Gallery
      Production Sketch Gallery
      Talent Files
         Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Marc Caro (Directors)
         Ron Perlman
         Angelo Badalamenti (Composer)
         Jean-Paul Gaultier (Costumes)
      Theatrical Trailer
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(14)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    IT'S THE BEST STYLISTIC FILM EVER!!!PERIOD!!!

    I've seen plenty of film's,and this one is the most stylistic,and visually impressive,especially when you consider the budget,that was about 8 million dollars.Now I know it may seem like alot,but for a big time director it's not.And this movie even now is impressive,and that's just the visuals themselves.So if I had to describe this movie,I'd say it's like a twisted dark industrial Alice in wonderland or something.With a style that totally can't be touched.I mean nowaday's I can look at a movie,and I can define it in about two seconds.Except for when it comes to this movie.I think it totally breaks the mold,then,and now.Plus this movie came out in 1995,and I still think it's the most beautiful,yet twisted movie I've ever had the privelidge to watch.Anyway's I also really liked the hole thing about the nightmares being like a foggy mist,and the bit with the flea was pure genius.Plus Judith Vittet(Miet)totally ruled in this movie.She's now my favorite young actress,or she used to be young anyway's.Not to mention Ron Pullman(One)who must of had a hard time in a french film,also did a good job.My only complaint is that there's no sequel!Plus I also thought that this movie could of used some big copper clockwork spider's,or something.Oh well,maybe if there's ever a sequel Jean Pierre could add something like that in.You know,they could maybe chase after Miette.Anyway's,you know how I feel about this movie.So just as long as you have a open mind,and don't mind a foriegn film that might just creep you out some times,I'd say put away those sorry excuses for a stylistic film like Dark city,and Edward scissor hand's,and be prepared to watch one that has no equal.This is a true masterpiece in the greatest sense of the word...

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Incredible!

    This movie was so creative and inspiring, yet disturbing at the same time. I can't encourage anyone out there to see it enough. It really will put a new perspective on dreams for you. Plus the music is simply gorgeous!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The French Version of Gilliam...

    Whenever I view Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro's films, I get the feeling I'm watching a Terry Gilliam French feature. In fact, before I watched this DVD, from which I bought on a whim, I watched the trailer to the feature and the beginning has a quote from Gilliam himself "Best Movie of 1995, 1996, and even 1982." Whatever that meant, I knew that this film would be a wild ride. Jeunet and Caro are masters of their craft and know how to make film into art. Like the other reviewers, this film has some of the most striking visuals of all time, very much so like Gilliam. Lots of diagnal and close-up camera angels and even the sets and costumes are wonderful as well to give you perception of not knowing when the story is set. All the characters are brilliant and I was suprised by Ron Perlman, not because he can't act, but because he did a suprisingly great job with speaking all his lines in near perfect French. Judith Vittet whom plays Miette is also another fine performance, especially for a 10yr old. The story itself also reminded me of a Gilliam flick, since it has some corky, odd, comedic, sci-fi mixture within the film. To me it's like a mix of Brazil/12 Monkeys/Tideland along with Jeunet and Caro's Delicatessen. I enjoyed this film which was filled with a lot of heart and is way ahead of its time. So if you like anything by Gilliam and even Jeunet and Caro's other works (Delicatessen/Amelie), then you should check this film out since it will stand the text of time for years and years to come.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    great move

    if you loved this movie LIKE I DID you have to see 'THE SECRET ADVENTURES OF TOM THE THUMB..'

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Engrossing, surreal visual appeal with plot.

    This title ranks among my top fictional films, full of dark nuances supported by appropriate visual setting. The cinematography - especially some of the close-ups - adds tremendous mood to the action.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A Whirl Wind of the Surrreal

    A great movie to watch when the mundane, day to day grind of work and life gets you down. Escape to a reality where children work as criminals for simese twins, a disembodied brain can live in a fish tank, clones run amuck, and you can be kidnapped by blindmen to have your dreams stolen by an evil scientist and a midget.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Immaculate

    combining Dark City with an acid trip is a pure hybrid causing a beauty beyond most of our comprehension.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A Surreal visually stunning dark epic film!!

    The story involves a carnival strongman named One played by Ron Pearlman, whose little brother Denree is kidnapped by a band of soldiers named cyclops, because one eye is an electrical lens and hypesensisitive sight and hearing and are quite ruthless, they kidnap kids and ship them off to an artificial island named Krank island named after the kidnapper who lives up to his name as an irritable, disfunctional person who has an inability to dream and with the help of a submerged living migraine ridden brain named Irwin, kept alive by artificial means to aid Krank in helping steal the kidnapped kid's dreams in an electronic sarcophagus, grudgingly and against his will. Then there is a group of clones played by Dominique Pinon, who I think is very comical, Irwin slowly encourages him to slowly rebel for he is meek and weak by telling him he is the original clone, leading to a big confusion. In the meantime One runs into Miette, a cynical street kid who is forced to steal to survive by a two siamese twin women who are very ruthless, and Miette played by Judith Vittet who is a good young actress helps One rescue Denree, inspite of obstacles put forth by the Siamese Twins. Are they successfull, you'll just have to see. You will enjoy the ride..

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Sensational!

    A sophisticated, incessantly dramatic escape into the dark seething parallel of ones imagination. Exquisitely photographed ¿ a visually stunning movie. I loved it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    An escape from real world

    This is an excellent movie for those who like unreal, imaginary setting. Casting, story, cinematography, everything is well done. I love movies like dreams or storys I used to read when I was a kid. From the director of Delicatessen.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews