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5.0 1
Director: Chris Smith, Michael Ruppert

Cast: Chris Smith, Michael Ruppert

 
Michael Ruppert is an independent journalist who has made a minor career out of telling people news that most folks do not want to know. Ruppert, a former police officer, predicted the Wall Street debacle of 2008 several years before the fact, at a time when most analysts were still imagining infinite growth for the stock market and major investment banks. Since then,

Overview

Michael Ruppert is an independent journalist who has made a minor career out of telling people news that most folks do not want to know. Ruppert, a former police officer, predicted the Wall Street debacle of 2008 several years before the fact, at a time when most analysts were still imagining infinite growth for the stock market and major investment banks. Since then, his vision of the world's future has grown only darker. As Ruppert sees it, civilization and the global economy has yet to wean itself off fossil fuels, and when the world's supply of oil finally runs out, it will lead to a global financial catastrophe that will leave no one unscathed. But while most of what Ruppert has to say bears the ring of truth, there's a small audience for his dire message -- the primary medium for his work is a self-published newsletter, and his most recent book has done so poorly in the marketplace that he faces eviction from his home. Is Ruppert right? And if he is, why doesn't anyone care? Filmmaker Chris Smith profiles Michael Ruppert and gives him a chance to explain his apocalyptic vision of the future at length in the documentary Collapse, which was an official selection at the 2009 Toronto International Film Festival.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
Until the release of Collapse, Roland Emmerich has reigned as the king of the contemporary end-of-the-world film with offerings such as 2012, The Day After Tomorrow, and Independence Day. But with this nonfiction film, director Chris Smith of American Movie fame has created an apocalyptic movie that is far more realistic in its predictions than any Hollywood production in memory. Collapse is the type of doom-and-gloom documentary that should have audiences running, but it's so masterfully made and riveting that it's impossible to look away. Channeling Errol Morris' interview-centric style of filmmaking, Smith focuses his efforts -- and his camera -- on Michael Ruppert. At first glance, Ruppert might appear to be a crackpot or conspiracy theorist who would feel at home with basement-bound loners. He publishes his own newsletter full of theories, veers wildly from posed questions, and offers survival tips in the event of civilization's destruction. As a UCLA grad-turned-L.A. cop-turned-investigative journalist, Ruppert has spent decades uncovering corruption and conspiracy. Collapse documents the man's largely correct predictions in 2005 and 2006 of the now-established financial crisis of the new millennium. Ruppert's ideas revolve around peak oil, the concept that the world has already passed its top oil production numbers and the number of barrels in the future will continue to decrease. He explains that a lack of oil goes beyond just powering our cars -- the resource is used in the production of everything from tires to all plastics, and it is even a major part of pesticides sprayed on crops. Once we run out, society as we know it will end, and the result will be the type of bare-bones existence depicted and dreaded in post-apocalyptic cinema. As depressing as the prognosis sounds, Ruppert also gives practical advice on how to thrive in a changed world. Collapse combines archival footage of its subject with contemporary interviews as he chain smokes his way through some grim talk. The film would be funny if it didn't seem so real, and its theatrical release during the landmark economic crisis only heightens the drama. Collapse is sure to divide audiences with its terrifying talk of the end of the world, but it's tough to debate the merits of Smith and his crew's filmmaking. From its tense score from Didier Leplae and Joe Wong to the tight editing from frequent Smith collaborator Barry Poltermann, this documentary is a lesson in creating tension. Horror film directors should take notes.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/15/2010
UPC:
0030306500096
Original Release:
2009
Rating:
NR
Source:
Filmbuff
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround]
Time:
1:20:00
Sales rank:
22,548

Special Features

Trailer; Deleted scenes; Collapse update

Related Subjects

Cast & Crew

Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Collapse
1. Revolution Calling [:08]
2. Michael [1:55]
3. Oil [3:42]
4. Saudi Arabia, Iraq, the Arctic and A.N.W.R. [3:59]
5. Transportation [5:07]
6. Electricity [5:05]
7. Credentials [2:58]
8. Food [1:55]
9. From the Wilderness [3:17]
10. Close [6:43]
11. Collapse [6:18]
12. Paradigm Shift [2:19]
13. Passengers [4:16]
14. Critical Thinking [5:22]
15. Going Home [6:34]
16. The Five Stages [3:46]
17. Balance [2:53]
18. Walk Away [6:11]
19. The 100th Monkey [2:32]
20. Close [2:20]

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Collapse 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago