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Come Out and Play
     

Come Out and Play

Director: Makinov

Cast: Vinessa Shaw, Ebon Moss-Bachrach, Gerardo Taracena

 

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An expectant couple arrive on a scenic island off the coast of Mexico, only to wage a desperate fight for survival against a vicious gang of murderous children in this remake of the 1976 horror classic Who Can Kill a Child? Francis (Ebon Moss-Bachrach) and Beth (Vinessa Shaw) are vacationing in

Overview

An expectant couple arrive on a scenic island off the coast of Mexico, only to wage a desperate fight for survival against a vicious gang of murderous children in this remake of the 1976 horror classic Who Can Kill a Child? Francis (Ebon Moss-Bachrach) and Beth (Vinessa Shaw) are vacationing in Mexico when they rent a boat to visit a nearby island known for having its very own Carnival. But by the time they arrive on the island, the festival has ended, and the streets are empty. Curiously, the only people they can find are young children who seem to roam the area without supervision. Attempting to check into a local hotel, Francis and Beth hear what appears to be a desperate distress call on the radio, but can't make out the language. Later, Francis watches in horror as the local children attack and disembowel an elderly man in the streets. Horrified, he runs back to the hotel and encounters a shell-shocked father who reveals that the children on the island have all gone insane, killing every adult in sight. As the laughter of children echoes through the streets, Francis and Beth realize that they must run and never look back if they ever hope to make it out of this nightmare alive.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Jason Buchanan
When hooded movie director Makinov premiered his debut feature Come Out and Play at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival, the crowded Midnight Madness screening was preceded by a personal manifesto based around the theory that "cinema should teach us about pain." "That's why," he continued, "I make these precious sad stories. To remind us that life is limited and that we are gonna die." Lamentably, rather than creating an original work of art that could have perfectly complemented his mysterious persona, he instead chose to make us aware of our own mortality by falling back on one of the horror genre's most tired tropes -- the remake. One would hope that a director possessed of such subversive passion -- and who claims to "want to scream at the person that keeps checking photos on Facebook" -- would be capable of telling an original story, or at the very least, using Narciso Ibáñez Serrador's disturbing 1976 film Who Can Kill a Child? (adapted from the novel by Juan José Plans) as a springboard to exploring more contemporary ideas about the disconnect between adults who grew up before the rise of the Internet and children who were born on the other side of that information divide. Instead, Makinov halfheartedly serves up a virtual shot-for-shot remake of a highly regarded classic that's been casually stripped of the original film's most powerful and polarizing traits -- including a profoundly disturbing prologue featuring actual massacre footage of atrocities committed against children. By audaciously compelling viewers to sit through such a sickening display, Serrador willfully committed an act of transgression against them that cast the fictional plot in a terrifyingly true light. Meanwhile, despite all of his pretentious prattle, Makinov takes no such risks, which essentially robs his bold manifesto of its sincerity. Expectant parents Francis (Ebon Moss-Bachrach) and Beth (Vinessa Shaw) are vacationing in Mexico when they rent a boat to visit Punta Hueca, a nearby island known for having its very own carnival. However, the streets are empty by the time they arrive at Punta Hueca. The only people Francis and Beth can find are young children who seem to roam the area without supervision. Attempting to check into a local hotel, the couple hear what appears to be a desperate distress call on the radio, but can't make out the language. Later, Francis watches in horror as the local children attack and disembowel an elderly man in the streets. Horrified, he runs back to the hotel and encounters a shell-shocked father, who reveals that the children on the island have all gone insane and are killing every adult in sight. As the laughter of children echoes through the streets, Francis and Beth realize that they must run and never look back if they ever hope to make it out of this nightmare alive. With his first feature as a director, Makinov succeeds at creating an oppressive atmosphere of sun-soaked dread, yet his seeming inability to grasp the mechanics of suspense casts a dejecting sense of flatness over the entire endeavor. It's as if he feels that the mere presence of malevolent children in the film is enough to keep us on edge, so instead of using pacing and timing to create tension, he simply cranks up the droning electronic soundtrack (which relies heavily on the obnoxious bass drops that are the bane of contemporary movie trailers) or resorts to gruesome gimmicks to keep us squirming in our seats -- neither of which prove fitting substitutes for genuine tension or proficient storytelling. Come Out and Play is, quite simply, the safest kind of horror remake imaginable, and no amount of adornment or bluster can make up for that cold, hard fact. Perhaps if Serrador's original film has eluded you and you're craving a killer-kiddie movie in an unusual setting, there may be enough here to satisfy your morbid curiosity. For everyone else, the most you're likely to get from this is a creeping suspicion that you've visited this island before, and the experience was much more terrifying when you didn't know the layout.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/18/2013
UPC:
0767685288696
Original Release:
2011
Source:
New Video Group
Time:
1:26:00
Sales rank:
54,611

Special Features

Behind-the-scenes making of featurette; Cast interviews; Deleted scenes

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