Woman Is a Woman

Woman Is a Woman

3.3 3
Director: Jean-Luc Godard

Cast: Anna Karina, Jean-Paul Belmondo, Jean-Claude Brialy

     
 

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Director Jean-Luc Godard's deceptively blithe tribute to the musical comedy features Anna Karina as an exotic dancer who decides that it is time for her to have a child. When her lover refuses to commit to the decision, she turns her romantic attentions to his best friend. This being a Godard film, the straightforward story serves as a framework for improvisation and… See more details below

Overview

Director Jean-Luc Godard's deceptively blithe tribute to the musical comedy features Anna Karina as an exotic dancer who decides that it is time for her to have a child. When her lover refuses to commit to the decision, she turns her romantic attentions to his best friend. This being a Godard film, the straightforward story serves as a framework for improvisation and stylistic experimentation, allowing for odd interludes and unexpected images. Rather than the sometimes alienating, dense intellectualism of later Godard works, Une femme est une femme offers aesthetic pleasure through luxurious visuals and a charming musical score by Michel Legrand. Against this bright backdrop, Karina proves particularly fetching, capturing the film's frolicsome mood in an unforced manner. While not one of Godard's most groundbreaking or influential films, Une femme est une femme is one of his most appealing and pleasurable efforts.Director Jean-Luc Godard's deceptively blithe tribute to the musical comedy features Anna Karina as an exotic dancer who decides that it is time for her to have a child. When her lover refuses to commit to the decision, she turns her romantic attentions to his best friend. This being a Godard film, the straightforward story serves as a framework for improvisation and stylistic experimentation, allowing for odd interludes and unexpected images. Rather than the sometimes alienating, dense intellectualism of later Godard works, Une femme est une femme offers aesthetic pleasure through luxurious visuals and a charming musical score by Michel Legrand. Against this bright backdrop, Karina proves particularly fetching, capturing the film's frolicsome mood in an unforced manner. While not one of Godard's most groundbreaking or influential films, Une femme est une femme is one of his most appealing and pleasurable efforts.

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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
Famously described by Jean-Luc Godard as "a neorealist musical, that is, a contradiction in terms," Une Femme Est Une Femme is as singular as its maker's caption suggests. Charming and jarring, sometimes within the same scene, Godard's third film does for the movie musical what Breathless, his groundbreaking debut, did for the gangster film. The movie has the makings of a typical musical -- attractive actors, bold colors, and melodious music, not to mention picturesque Paris. Not any less pleasurable is Godard's technical mastery. Graceful camera moves, harmonious choreography within the frame, and expressionistic lighting make the movie a joy to watch from a purely formal standpoint. As it becomes clear early on, however, these distinct elements never quite cohere in the way we expect them to. The score flits in and out of a musical number unexpectedly; scenes and the songs accompanying them end unfinished; title cards and direct addresses to the audience interrupt the narrative. Never allowing us to succumb to the spell of movie alchemy, Godard pulls back the curtain to call attention to the inner workings of a genre designed to captivate. For all its attempts at autocritique, the movie nonetheless creates its own transfixing beauty. Playfully cerebral and never less than lovely -- it opens and ends, aptly enough, with a coy wink at its audience -- Une Femme Est Une Femme may be the warmest gesture in Godard's career-long interrogation of film's glories and deceptions.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/12/1999
UPC:
0720917505220
Original Release:
1961
Rating:
NR
Source:
Fox Lorber
Time:
1:24:00

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Anna Karina Angela
Jean-Paul Belmondo Alfred Lubitsch
Jean-Claude Brialy Emile Recamier
Nicole Paquin Suzanne
Marie Dubois 1st Prostitute
Jeanne Moreau Herself
Catherine Demongeot Actor
Ernest Menzer Bar Owner
Marion Sarraut 2nd Prostitute

Technical Credits
Jean-Luc Godard Director,Screenwriter
Charles Aznavour Songwriter
Raoul Coutard Cinematographer
Georges de Beauregard Producer
Philippe Dussart Production Manager
Bernard Evein Art Director,Costumes/Costume Designer
Agnès Guillemot Editor
Lila Herman Editor
Michel Legrand Score Composer
Carlo Ponti Producer
Guy Villette Sound/Sound Designer

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Scene Index

Side #1 --
   Play Feature
   Scene Access
   Filmography
      Jean-Luc Godard
      Anna Karina
      Jean-Paul Belmondo
   Cast
   Production Credits

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