Cujo

Cujo

4.0 10
Director: Lewis Teague

Cast: Dee Wallace, Danny Pintauro, Daniel Hugh Kelly

     
 

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Based on a Stephen King novel, Cujo is not as menacing or as frightening as other film adaptations of King's popular stories and especially cannot compare to the 1976 Carrie. Cujo is a happy St. Bernard until he is bitten on the nose by a rabid bat and slowly begins manifesting the symptoms of his fatal illness. His condition deteriorates as he

Overview

Based on a Stephen King novel, Cujo is not as menacing or as frightening as other film adaptations of King's popular stories and especially cannot compare to the 1976 Carrie. Cujo is a happy St. Bernard until he is bitten on the nose by a rabid bat and slowly begins manifesting the symptoms of his fatal illness. His condition deteriorates as he attacks people again and again, until finally, mom Donna Trenton (Dee Wallace) and her son Tad (Danny Pintauro) are trapped inside the family car with Cujo lurking nearby, set to kill them any way he can. A showdown is inevitable but is as predictable as the rest of the film.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Robert Firsching
This widely reviled adaptation of Stephen King's best-selling novel about a viciously rabid dog actually looks better with age. True, story lines move in and out of the first half of the film, inconsistencies abound, and the viewer may be just about to give up hope when Donna (Dee Wallace) and her young son, Tad (Danny Pintauro), pull into a junkyard in a broken-down car. From that point on, the film becomes a sort of landlocked Jaws, as mother and son are trapped in the stalled machine by the bloody, slobbering hellhound waiting just outside. The final 40 minutes are surprisingly scary, as director Lewis Teague builds the tension to a fever-pitch with a combination of stunning attack sequences and effective hysterical-mother moments inside the car. Wallace is outstanding in one of her better performances, but cinematographer Jan De Bont (who later directed The Haunting and Twister) is the real star of the show and rarely falters. Neil Travis' editing deserves special praise for enhancing the horror of the dog attacks, but the music (by Charles Bernstein) is awful. Still, if one can patiently withstand the dumb first half, there are plenty of thrills, chills, and a great jump-scene later in the film.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/22/2013
UPC:
0887090051606
Original Release:
1983
Rating:
R
Source:
Olive Films
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Time:
1:33:00
Sales rank:
20,631

Special Features

New 2012 audio commentary by director Lewis Teague

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Dee Wallace Donna Trenton
Danny Pintauro Tad Trenton
Daniel Hugh Kelly Vic Trenton
Christopher Stone Steve Kemp
Ed Lauter Joe Camber
Kaiulani Lee Charity Camber
Billy Jayne Brett Camber
Mills Watson Gary Pervier
Robert Behling Fournier
Daniel H. Blatt Actor
Terence Donovan Actor
Bob Elross Meara
Jerry Hardin Masen
Clare Nono Lady Reporter
Claire Nono Lady Reporter
Merritt Olsen Professor
Arthur Rosenberg Roger Breakstone
Sandy Ward Bannerman

Technical Credits
Lewis Teague Director
Charles Bernstein Score Composer
Daniel H. Blatt Producer
Jack Buehler Costumes/Costume Designer
Guy J. Comtois Production Designer
Lauren Currier Screenwriter
Jan de Bont Cinematographer
Don Carlos Dunaway Screenwriter
Joseph T. Garrity Set Decoration/Design
Jerry Grandey Asst. Director
Judith Holstra Casting
Rick H. Josephsen Special Effects
Peter Knowlton Makeup,Makeup Special Effects
Neil Machlis Associate Producer
Marcia Ross Casting
Robert Singer Producer
Neil Travis Editor
Mark Ulano Sound/Sound Designer
Stephen King Source Author

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Cujo 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Anonymous 7 months ago
The dog in this is well trained. He simulated aggression and attacks nicely. Him attacking men and taring out throats was quite believable. His eyes, however, never looked mad, that a dog can't be trained to fake. Cujo was a very smart Saint-Bernard. He was sweet, loyal, and loved people - especially children. He was a dog anyone would want to pet. Once bitten by a bat, that all changed. He changes by degrees. Slowly he becomes rabid, eventually reaching the point that he'd stalk and attack anyone. Donna and Tad are cornered by Cujo. Trapped in a stalled car by a massive dog with powerful jaws. The risk was more than just being killed. Cujo could infect either of them. This showed rabies in all it's horror.
12345DG More than 1 year ago
Very Scary Moments When Cujo Attacks Tads Mother And Bites her on the leg. Then The Mother Grabs The Gun And Shoots Cujo Down Putting An End To The Dangerous Rabid Dog.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It really makes you think about how rabies can be spreaded and what it can do to you!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have to admit I usually don't dislike movies but I truly wasn't pleased with Cujo. There wasn't enough killing, it just seemed the dog got bitten, he killed a couple people, and then it ended. Don't get me wrong, I didn't expect this to be a bloodbath. Anyways, i gave it 3 stars, anybody else can give it what they want.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Their should be a remake.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm not going to review the movie, as most will have already. As this is the 25th anniversary edition, I'll review the contents. First: the original DVD of Cujo. It came ONLY in full-screen, and had the movie on the DVD "yup that was about it". So there is no doubt that this edition is better. First of all, the packaging: the movie comes in a standard DVD case, with a MUCH better-looking cover than the first edition's "somewhat" cheezy picture. Going around this standard case is a slip-case that is foggy on the front cover "it is clear on all of the other sides". Printed on the slip-case is the Cujo tag you see around the dogs neck, and the words 25th Anniversary Edition. This is done so the whole front cover is fogged-up except for the title and 25th Anniversary proclamation. Inside the case is an insert that "on one side" has advertisements for other LionsGate films, and "on the other side" the scene titles. The DVD itself: it has an animated menu that is much more detailed, to begin with. Not much else to say, other than the fact that the DVD looks much cooler. Extras: well, you get it in widescreen, first of all! Really, the only other bonus feature "albeit a good one" is a three-part documentary on the making of Cujo. Okay, so the DVD "as a stand-alone" isn't THAT great. But compared to the original release of Cujo, it is a wonderful improvement.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Scary, with moments that will leave a lump in your throat.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago