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Dangerous Game

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Overview

Celebrated indie filmmaker Eddie Israel Harvey Keitel heads to California to shoot his latest movie, Mother of Mirrors, an examination of a marriage in which the wife pressures her husband to abandon their formerly mutual sex-and-drugs lifestyle and seek the same kind of religious conversion she has experienced. Leaving behind his own wife Madlyn Nancy Ferrara and his young son, Eddie explains the impetus of his latest project in a series of behind-the-scenes interviews. Meanwhile, Sarah Jennings Madonna, a TV ...
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Overview

Celebrated indie filmmaker Eddie Israel Harvey Keitel heads to California to shoot his latest movie, Mother of Mirrors, an examination of a marriage in which the wife pressures her husband to abandon their formerly mutual sex-and-drugs lifestyle and seek the same kind of religious conversion she has experienced. Leaving behind his own wife Madlyn Nancy Ferrara and his young son, Eddie explains the impetus of his latest project in a series of behind-the-scenes interviews. Meanwhile, Sarah Jennings Madonna, a TV actress, has taken the wife role in Eddie's film, and her first item of business on the set is to sleep with Francis Burns James Russo, who is set to play her husband. Things go sour between the two players and their conflicts spill onto the set, adding even more tension to a shoot in which Eddie alternately bullies and cajoles his actors to elicit more authentic performances. Perhaps Eddie manipulates Sarah onscreen because he's ashamed of having bedded his "very L.A." star just minutes before his wife and son arrived early for a weekend visit. Eddie soon finds the existential dilemmas of his film seeping into his own life, forcing him to question the compulsive adultery he practices. One of the first movies overseen by the film arm of Maverick, the record label and media company Madonna founded in the early '90s, Dangerous Game was produced by the singer's longtime manager, Freddy de Mann, alongside Mary E. Kane, who produced several earlier Ferrara efforts.
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Brian J. Dillard
Although it's a bit of a self-indulgent mess and its philosophical debates aren't written well enough to truly engage, this reteaming of bad-boy director Abel Ferrara with his Bad Lieutenant star, Harvey Keitel, is notable for the surprising strength of Madonna's performance. As Sarah Jennings, a television star striving to forge a career as a dramatic actress, Madonna -- a pop star who's been striving for years to forge a career as any sort of actress -- seems less mannered, more off-guard, and more affecting than she ever has before or since. Dangerous Game's self-referential structure -- big-name celebrity known for bedding her leading men stars in film about big-name celebrity who promptly beds her leading man -- could probably keep an assistant literature professor churning out post-structuralist analyses for an entire semester. Nonetheless, there is some fun in speculating how much the lines Keitel's character spits at Madonna's character stung the performer in real life. "You'd still be selling toothpaste if it wasn't for me," Eddie barks as the camera rolls, and it's hard not to substitute the phrase "making music videos" for "selling toothpaste." In interviews, Madonna complained that the final edit was nothing like the original pitch Ferrara gave her, which perhaps explains why her company underpromoted the film upon its release. Ultimately, though, it's Keitel who stands in for Ferrara and gives the film its nasty center; the director even cast his real-life wife in the role of Eddie's wife, further blurring the line between the real and the cinematic. In the end, despite Ferrara's pretensions that both his film and its film-within-a-film get at deeper issues of spirituality and self-determination, Dangerous Game can best be appreciated as an exercise in celebrity exploitation with just the thinnest veneer of art-house cred.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 7/26/2005
  • UPC: 883904130017
  • Original Release: 1993
  • Source: Mgm (Video & Dvd)
  • Format: DVD

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Harvey Keitel Eddie Israel
Madonna Sarah Jennings
James Russo Francis Burns
Nancy Ferrara Madlyn Israel
Reilly Murphy Tommy
Victor Argo Director of Photography
Christina Fulton Blonde
Leonard Thomas Prop Guy
Glenn Plummer Burns' Buddy
Lori Eastside Party Guest
John Snyder Party Guest
Adina Winston Party Guest
Dylan Hundley Party Guest
Julie Pop Morton's Waitress
Anthony Redman Swinger
Randall Sabusawa Producer
Jesse Long Script Supervisor
Bill Pope Camera Operator
Martin Schaer Camera Operator
Hiram Ortiz Hair
Heather Bracken Stewardess
Niki Munroe Girl in Trailer
Juliette Hohnen Bar Patron
Lili Barsha Flight Attendant
Robyn B. Ashley Flight Attendant
Noga Isackson 1st AD
Mindy Eshelman Wardrobe
Linda Murphy Boom Operator
Marta Bukowski Video Tap Monitor
Jim Fitzgerald 1st Assistant Cameraman
Steven Albert Boxing Announcer
Technical Credits
Abel Ferrara Director, Screenwriter
Michael Barosky Sound Mixer
Marta N. Bukowski Camera Operator
Nathan Crowley Art Director
Joseph Cuervo Makeup
Raqueli Dahan Makeup
Freddy de Mann Executive Producer
Joe Delia Score Composer
Steve Drellich Camera Operator
Mary Kane Producer
Ken Kelsch Cinematographer
Charles Lagola Art Director
Terry Miller Asst. Director
George Mooradian Camera Operator
Phil Oetiker Camera Operator
Diana Phillips Production Designer
Anthony Redman Editor
Ron Rotholz Executive Producer
Randall Sabusawa Casting
Greg Sheldon Musical Direction/Supervision
Nicholas St. John Screenwriter
Marlene Stewart Costumes/Costume Designer
Alex Tavoularis Production Designer
Stephanie Ziemer Set Decoration/Design
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    Dangerous Game NOT Harvey's OR Madonna's BEST!!!!

    Madonna at her worst probably......Keitel kinda stands out in film that is lacking and Russo is ok.....but it is slow and linda like a docu drama gone awry.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews