Dark Harbor

Dark Harbor

5.0 1
Director: Adam Coleman Howard

Cast: Adam Coleman Howard, Alan Rickman, Polly Walker, Norman Reedus

     
 
The thriller Dark Harbor arrives on DVD from Artisan with a full-screen transfer and Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound. Also contains a commentary track with writer/director Adam Coleman Howard. In addition to the trailer, the special features include cast and crew biographies.Adam Coleman directed this psychological thriller that opens as attorney David (Alan

Overview

The thriller Dark Harbor arrives on DVD from Artisan with a full-screen transfer and Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound. Also contains a commentary track with writer/director Adam Coleman Howard. In addition to the trailer, the special features include cast and crew biographies.Adam Coleman directed this psychological thriller that opens as attorney David (Alan Rickman) and Alexis Weinberg (Polly Walker), trying to catch the last ferry to their island home, spot a man (Norman Reedus) alongside the rainswept road. He's bleeding from a beating by unknown assailants and will only accept assistance from David and Alexis if they agree not to call the police. The delay keeps the Weinbergs from boarding the final ferry, so they rent a motel room. Later, the nameless, mysterious man becomes a stowaway on the ferry and arrives on the island. After he once again bumps into the Weinbergs, they invite him to stay at their cottage. Is the couple a target? Or has the stranger been hired by one spouse to eliminate the other? Shown at the 1998 Seattle Film Festival and the 1998 Hamptons Film Festival.

Product Details

Release Date:
04/11/2000
UPC:
0012236109792
Original Release:
1998
Rating:
R
Source:
Live / Artisan
Region Code:
1
Presentation:
[Pan & Scan]
Sound:
[Dolby Digital]
Time:
1:29:00

Special Features

Commentary with director Adam Coleman Howard; Full-screen version; Dolby Digital 5.1 audio; Dolby Surround audio; Trailer; Cast and crew information; Digitally mastered; Scene access; Interactive menus

Related Subjects

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Alan Rickman David Weinberg
Polly Walker Alexis Chandler Weinberg
Norman Reedus Young Man

Technical Credits
Adam Coleman Howard Director,Screenwriter
Kerry Barden Casting
Markus Canter Production Designer
Humberto Condero Art Director
Annette Davey Editor
Kevin Donaldson Costumes/Costume Designer
Erin Flanagan Costumes/Costume Designer
John Hart Producer
Billy Hopkins Casting
Judy Karp Sound/Sound Designer
Justin Lazard Producer,Screenwriter
Walt Lloyd Cinematographer
David Mansfield Score Composer
Al Munteamu Associate Producer
Peter Pap Associate Producer
Rachel Peters Associate Producer
Jeffrey Roda Associate Producer
Jeff Sharp Producer
Suzanne Smith Casting

Scene Index

Side #1 --
   Play Feature
   Audio Setup/Commentary
      Digital Surround 5.1
      Digital Surround 2.0
      Director's Commentary
         On
         Off
   Special Features
      Trailer
      Filmographies/Biographies
         Cast
            Alan Rickman
            Polly Walker
            Norma Reedus
            Sasha Lazard
         Filmmakers
            Adam Coleman Howard (Writer/Director)
            Justin Lazard (Writer/Producer)
            John N. Hart (Producer)
            Jeffrey Sharp (Producer)

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Dark Harbor 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In an age when movies either blow viewers' brains to smithereens in order to ensure ''entertainment value'', or bore them to tears in an attempt to achieve ''artistic meaning'', DARK HARBOR is a true revelation. Centering on the relationship between a rich married couple (brilliant Alan Rickman and gorgeous Polly Walker) and a bloody young stranger (ghostly Norman Reedus) who shows up on their private island off the coast of Maine, DARK HARBOR avoids the simplistic pomposity of A-list con jobs like INSOMNIA or ROAD TO PERDITION, and expertly lures us into a mysterious world full of lust, intrigue and deception, while maintaining a emotionnal subtlety that is not only rare, but practically extinct in our current cinema. The fact that this underappreciated masterpiece was deprived of a proper theatrical release should make the entire movie industry bow its (brainless) head in shame -- not because it is a work of art (which it is), but because it would have fed an audience starving for erotic intelligence and made a fortune!