Days of Wine and Roses

( 1 )

Overview

In this addiction melodrama, Joe Clay Jack Lemmon, a promising adman, meet his future wife Kirsten Lee Remick at a party. Once married, the pressures of his business lead Joe to seek solace in liquor. Kirsten joins him in his nocturnal drinking sessions, and before long both are confirmed alcoholics. After several frightening episodes, Joe is able to shake the habit thanks to AA, but Kirsten finds it impossible to get through the day without liquor. The two split up, although Joe clings to the hope that someday ...
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Overview

In this addiction melodrama, Joe Clay Jack Lemmon, a promising adman, meet his future wife Kirsten Lee Remick at a party. Once married, the pressures of his business lead Joe to seek solace in liquor. Kirsten joins him in his nocturnal drinking sessions, and before long both are confirmed alcoholics. After several frightening episodes, Joe is able to shake the habit thanks to AA, but Kirsten finds it impossible to get through the day without liquor. The two split up, although Joe clings to the hope that someday he and Kirsten will be reunited, if for no reason other than the sake of their young daughter. J.P. Miller adapted the screenplay from his own 1958 Playhouse 90 television script. Though nominated in several categories, Days of Wine and Roses won only the Best Song Oscar for Henry Mancini's title tune.
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Special Features

Closed Caption; Commentary by Director Blake Edwards ; Vintage Jack Lemmon Interview; Theatrical Trailers
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Ed Hulse
Adapted from a well-regarded episode of TV's Playhouse 90 series, this superb drama -- a bittersweet love story with harrowing complications -- earned kudos for its uncompromising realism upon theatrical release in 1962. It has weathered the intervening four decades with very little loss of effectiveness; even today Days and Wine and Roses retains the power to shock. Jack Lemmon portrays a San Francisco public relations man whose floundering career gives him an excuse to accelerate his heavy drinking. Worried that she's losing her husband to the demon alcohol, beautiful but insecure wife Lee Remick hits the bottle with him, hoping somehow to regenerate their diminished compatibility. The results aren't pretty. Blake Edwards, better known for comedies such as The Pink Panther movies and 10, depicts Lemmon and Remick's downward spiral with brutal frankness and a calculated disregard for the facile solutions and empty platitudes of typical Hollywood movies. Lemmon's performance is both dynamic and chilling; his descent into a self-made Hell is positively blood-curdling. Remick, too, is effective in a difficult role, suggesting early on that she has an addictive personality that will facilitate her own succumbing to alcohol's anesthetic effects. Both stars earned well-deserved Academy Award nominations for their performances, but it was composer Henry Mancini who actually took home an Oscar that year for his title song, a deeply evocative standard
All Movie Guide - Richard Gilliam
Days of Wine and Roses is among director Blake Edwards's best films, likely his best non-comedy. Where many films about alcoholism may indulge a smug, moral superiority, the tone here is more of examination than of judgment. The performances from Jack Lemmon and Lee Remick are first-rate, as is the supporting performance of Charles Bickford. It is among the screen's most realistic and believable depictions of its subject matter, remarkable as a commercial success in an era that supposedly didn't want films of personal realism. While The Days of Wine and Roses is seldom studied in film schools, it is still often shown in college courses in the social sciences, for its continuing relevance to alcohol and other substance abuse problems. The film was nominated for six Oscars but won only for Henry Mancini's title song, which is now one of its few aspects that seems dated.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 11/9/2010
  • UPC: 883929151967
  • Original Release: 1962
  • Rating:

  • Source: Warner Home Video
  • Region Code: 1
  • Presentation: Wide Screen / Repackaged
  • Language: English
  • Time: 1:57:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 1,509

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Jack Lemmon Joe Clay
Lee Remick Kirsten Anderson
Charles Bickford Ellis Arnesen
Jack Klugman Jim Hungerford
Alan Hewitt "Red" Leland
Tom Palmer Ballefoy
Debbie Megowan Debbie Clay
Maxine Stuart Dottie
Jack Albertson Traynor
Dick Crockett Boors
J. Pat O'Malley Tenant
Olan Soule Elevator Operator
Ken Lynch Liquor Store Owner
Mary Benoit Tenant
Gail Bonney Gladys
Ella Ethridge Tenant
Barbara Hines Guest
Charlene Holt Guest
James Lanphier
Jack Riley Waiter
Tom Rosqui Bettor
Robert "Buddy" Shaw Tenant
Katherine Squire Mrs. Nolan
Technical Credits
Blake Edwards Director
Donfeld Costumes/Costume Designer
Jack Hayes Musical Arrangement
George James Hopkins Set Decoration/Design
Horace L. Hulburd Special Effects
Philip H. Lathrop Cinematographer
Henry Mancini Score Composer
Martin Manulis Producer
Patrick McCormack Editor
Johnny Mercer Songwriter
J.P. Miller Screenwriter
Joseph C. Wright Art Director
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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Days of Wine and Roses
1. Credits [2:14]
2. #7 [4:05]
3. A Name for It [2:58]
4. Elevator [5:36]
5. That Brandy Thing [3:32]
6. Together in Heaven [6:58]
7. Man of Principle [3:44]
8. Roach Kingdom Revolt [3:40]
9. Newlyweds [7:01]
10. Taking Care of Business [4:59]
11. Drinking Buddies [5:52]
12. Not Everybody's Honest [4:31]
13. Kirsten's Accident [4:44]
14. A Couple of Bums [2:51]
15. A New Start [2:03]
16. Not-So-Private Party [5:31]
17. Greenhouse Foray [6:21]
18. Shower and Strait Jacket [2:55]
19. Alcoholics Anonymous [5:28]
20. Kirsten Missing [5:07]
21. Go Away, Sober Joe [6:04]
22. Relapse [3:37]
23. All the Booze You Want [2:42]
24. If You Really Love Her [1:48]
25. Making Good [3:51]
26. The Way the World Looks [3:55]
27. Joe's Choice [4:52]
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Menu

Disc #1 -- Days of Wine and Roses
   Play Movie
   Scene Selections
   Special Features
      Commentary by Blake Edwards
      Jack Lemmon Interview
      Theatrical Trailer
      Theatrical Trailer #2
   Languages
      Spoken Languages
         English
      Subtitles
         English
         Français
         Español
         Subtitles: Off
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Lemmon and Remick shine in their best dramatic roles

    A movie by and for adults (a refreshing change) 'Days' is one of the most realistic depictions of addiction ever recorded on celluloid. Lee Remick is heartbreaking as the country girl overwhelmed by the big city, who Lemmon cajoles into drinking with him when he gets home at night. Not wanting to let him loose on the bar scene, she gives in, and becomes more addicted than he. When she goes to a cheap motel with another man because Lemmon can no longer drink with her, then calls him to save her, I was in tears. When she pleads with him to let her back in the house with their daughter, having managed to stay sober for over a week, his choice is excruciating. Blake Edwards wasted his career with Pink Panther and Julie Andrews movies; for a brief time, he was one of Hollywood's best dramatic directors

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews