Eating Raoul

( 4 )

Overview

Eating Raoul was celebrated at the time of its release as the perfect marriage between mainstream moviemaking and the so-called "underground" cinema. Cult-film icons Mary Woronov and Paul Bartel both of whom directed play a married couple who decide to cash in on the sexual perversions of others. Posing as a hooker, Woronov lures the "johns" in and indulges their every kinky whim, whereupon Bartel kills the unwary client, steals the valuables, and sells the corpse for dog food. Though they see nothing wrong in ...
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Overview

Eating Raoul was celebrated at the time of its release as the perfect marriage between mainstream moviemaking and the so-called "underground" cinema. Cult-film icons Mary Woronov and Paul Bartel both of whom directed play a married couple who decide to cash in on the sexual perversions of others. Posing as a hooker, Woronov lures the "johns" in and indulges their every kinky whim, whereupon Bartel kills the unwary client, steals the valuables, and sells the corpse for dog food. Though they see nothing wrong in what they're doing, they react in prudish disgust at the sexual preferences of their victims. Eventually, Raoul Robert Beltran, the fellow who transports the corpses to the dog food concern, proves expendable--and extremely edible. Eating Raoul features a high-powered comic supporting cast, among them Buck Henry, Ed Begley Jr., Richard Paul, Hamilton Camp, and Edie McClurg.
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Michael Costello
Paul Bartel's black comedy about a middle-class couple who want to open a restaurant has become a cult classic. Bartel and Mary Woronov play a staid couple who formulate a plan to murder and rob "swingers" to finance their dream of opening a gourmet restaurant. Bartel, who dealt in black comedy long before it became fashionable, has created an oddly affectionate satire of this Moral Majority couple, whose righteousness is concealed behind anonymous polyester surfaces, and are literally dubbed the Blands. Although they believe that the "swingers," i.e. anyone single who is having sex, deserve to die for their terrible transgressions, they're so humane toward their victims that they evoke especially unctuous undertakers. Mary Woronov, a fixture of Warhol's Factory in the '60s, and someone whose mien always suggested the unspeakable, is a witty choice as the homicidal wife, and Bartel adopts the role of tract-house suburbanite with eerie aplomb.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/25/2012
  • UPC: 715515098618
  • Original Release: 1982
  • Rating:

  • Source: Criterion
  • Presentation: Wide Screen
  • Language: English
  • Time: 1:23:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 23,074

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Paul Bartel Paul Bland
Mary Woronov Mary
Robert Beltran Raoul
Susan Saiger Doris the Dominatrix
Ed Begley Jr. Hippy
Dan Barrows Bobbie R.
Dick Blackburn James
Ralph Brannen Raoul's Friend
Hamilton Camp Mr. Peck
Buck Henry Mr. Leech
Edie McClurg Susan
Richard Paul Mr. Kray
Mark Woods Hold-up Man
John Shearin Patient
Darcy Pulliam Nurse Sheila
Arlene Harris Swinger
Garry Goodrow Drunk Swinger
Anna Mathias Secretary
Allan Rich Nazi
Billy Curtis Little Person
John Paragon Sexshop Salesman
Don Steele Host
Rick Waln Doris' Admirer
Robert V. Barron Butler at Swingers Party
Myron Meisel
Carol Bahoric
Technical Credits
Paul Bartel Director, Screenwriter
Richard Blackburn Screenwriter
Anne Kimmel Producer
Arlon Ober Score Composer
Bob Schulenberg Production Designer
Gary Thieltges Cinematographer
Alan Toomayan Editor
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2012

    This is a magnificent work by Paul Bartel. It's hard to believe

    This is a magnificent work by Paul Bartel. It's hard to believe that another viewed was bored by the method of killing (the frying pan), and would have liked it better "if Paul killed the victims in different ways." As if the method of murder had anything to do with the black comedy itself.
    "Eating Raoul" is a thinking-person's satire.
    If the "method" of killing is your main concern, you should be watching "Friday the 13th" rip-offs.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Not very good

    This is a movie that is very boring to watch. It was very painful for me to get through the entire film, but somehow, I got through it. I think the only thing that got me through it was the thought of something interesting actually happening. I got my hopes us and they were shot down. This is a boring movie about a couple who's hunger for money to run a high-class restaurant drives them to killing kinky people and robbing them of everything they have. I thought the concept of the movie was pretty interesting, but the repetitiveness of the movie drags its potential way down. It would have been nice if Paul killed the victims in different ways than just clocking them in the head with a frying pan. The first time he does it, it's kinda funny; the next million times he kills people with a hit to the head with a frying pan is just too repetitive and uninteresting. I was actually relieved to see Raoul strangle someone with a chain to add some variety, but that's the only thing different about the deaths, the other deaths are with the frying pan.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews