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El cielo dividido

( 4 )

Overview

Mexican short-film specialist Julian Hernandez marks his sophomore feature film with this erotic, impressionistic tale about an emotionally tumultuous love triangle experienced between three attractive twenty-something men. Gerardo (Miguel Angel Hoppe) is a sensitive man who is deeply in love with longtime boyfriend Jonas (Fernando Arroyo). When Jonas becomes infatuated with a stranger he recently met at a local nightclub, heartbroken Gerardo soon seeks solace in the arms of sympathetic Sergio (Alejandro Rojo). ...
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DVD (Wide Screen / Uncensored / Subtitled / en español)
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Overview

Mexican short-film specialist Julian Hernandez marks his sophomore feature film with this erotic, impressionistic tale about an emotionally tumultuous love triangle experienced between three attractive twenty-something men. Gerardo (Miguel Angel Hoppe) is a sensitive man who is deeply in love with longtime boyfriend Jonas (Fernando Arroyo). When Jonas becomes infatuated with a stranger he recently met at a local nightclub, heartbroken Gerardo soon seeks solace in the arms of sympathetic Sergio (Alejandro Rojo). Though his lovelorn pains are palpable, Gerardo remains incapable of ending his romance with Jonas despite the rapidly deepening chasm that seems to be splitting the once-happy pair apart.
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Special Features

Exclusive promo reel; Theatrical poster exploration gallery; Other Strand Releasing trailers
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 1/16/2007
  • UPC: 712267260928
  • Original Release: 2005
  • Rating:

  • Source: Strand Home Video
  • Presentation: Wide Screen / Uncensored / Subtitled / en español
  • Language: Spanish
  • Time: 2:20:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 48,139

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Miguel Ángel Hoppe Gerardo
Fernando Arroyo Jonas
Alejandro Rojo Sergio
Klaudia Aragón
Ignacio Pereda
Clarisa Rendón
Technical Credits
Julián Hernández Director, Screenwriter
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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Broken Sky
1. Opening [3:28]
2. Union [9:04]
3. Fruition [15:40]
4. Temptation [5:15]
5. Infidelity [3:42]
6. Desire [4:50]
7. Discord [21:50]
8. Retribution [17:47]
9. Retrospection [19:10]
10. Dissolution [15:56]
11. Reunion [17:23]
12. Credits [5:07]
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Menu

Disc #1 -- Broken Sky
   Play Feaure
   Chapters
   Theatrical Campaign Exploration
   Exclusive Promo Reel
   Other Strand Titles
      Soap
      Paper Dolls
      Time to Leave
      Two Drifters
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    Beautifully done!

    Captivating!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A Song Without Words

    'El Cielo dividido' (BROKEN SKY) is a daring, experimental film from Mexican writer/director Julián Hernández and as such it is bound to polarize audiences. Some will fault the film for self-indulgence while others will praise the bravery of a film of this topic to come from a country not exactly known for its flexible social attitudes. Julián Hernández focuses on the history of a first love and without using dialogue he tells his story simply with silent actors, minimal narrative comments which serve as program notes, music, and ravishingly beautiful photographic composition. Gerardo (Miguel Ángel Hoppe) opens the film, a solo youth wandering what appears to be the streets of Mexico City finally ending up in an open amphitheater where his eye glimpses another lone youth Jonas (Fernando Arroyo) sitting staring into space. Gerardo wanders over to him, sits beside him, gains the courage to touch his shoulder, Jonas responds glowingly - and love begins. Through the next scenes we find the couple making love both in bed and in unexpected public places including the stacks of the library of the school where they both are students -and where another pair of eyes enters: Sergio (Alejandro Rojo) watches longingly as Gerardo and Jonas kiss and display an aura of passion Sergio obviously longs for. The new couple share many experiences, all bathed in love, until they eventually go to a disco: Jonas dances with an enchanted Bruno (Ignacio Pereda) and a trace of chemistry is generated, a fact that Gerardo, watching the boys dance, senses and is disturbed. A crack is created in their bliss and that crack only widens as they each have mixed responses to what they perceive is escaping. Gerardo encounters the winsome Sergio and the two bond physically, a fact that forces Jason to reevaluate his initial feelings for Gerardo. All of this story is told without dialogue of words but with a very strong dialogue of eyes. Director Hernández seems to want to share how love is an internalized emotion, only demonstrated with physical intimacy, but fragile as a newborn in its vulnerability to wounds. Cinematographer Alejandro Cantú finds stunning settings and lighting and sensitive explorations of love making that never exceed tasteful states. His manner of showing time elapsing is to pan walls within a room that serve as flashbacks and flash-forwards as a means of carrying the story forward. Film editor Emiliano Arenales Osorio uses some very creative techniques to keep the viewer guessing as to whether we are observing fact, fantasy, present or past. And the musical score by Arturo Villela deftly maintains the minimalist stance with simple phrases by cello, harpsichord, and violin, saving the passion expression for the use of Dvorák in Rusalka's 'Song to the Moon' as ravishingly sung by Renée Fleming All of those praises being said, the major reason this film doesn't retain an audience base is its length: it is 140 minutes long, repetitive, and would have been much more powerful had it been cut to 90 minutes at best. It is far too visually stunning a piece of work to step beyond the patience of an audience happy to see the birth and blossoming and challenges of a first love between two beautiful young men. The actors are indeed a pleasure to watch, but in this case less is more. One wonders what Julián Hernández will create next. He deserves applause for this experimental film but hopefully will learn from its tendency toward self-indulgence. Grady Harp

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews