Every Girl Should Be Married

Every Girl Should Be Married

Director: Don Hartman

Cast: Cary Grant, Franchot Tone, Diana Lynn

     
 

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Cary Grant met his future wife Betsy Drake on the set of the appropriately titled Every Girl Should be Married. Grant plays well-known baby specialist Madison Brown, who is Dr. Spock in everything but name. After a chance meeting with headstrong young Anabel Sins (Drake), poor Brown finds his every move and thought monitored by Anabel, who intends to become hisSee more details below

Overview

Cary Grant met his future wife Betsy Drake on the set of the appropriately titled Every Girl Should be Married. Grant plays well-known baby specialist Madison Brown, who is Dr. Spock in everything but name. After a chance meeting with headstrong young Anabel Sins (Drake), poor Brown finds his every move and thought monitored by Anabel, who intends to become his wife come heck or high water. Upset that Brown steadfastly resists her charms, Anabel decides to make him jealous by playing up to her boss Roger Sanford (Franchot Tone). When Brown still won't bite, our plucky heroine mounts a campaign enlisting everybody in town to wear down the doctor's resistance. Nowadays, this is called "stalking"; in 1948, it was called "funny." Produced, directed and written by Don Hartman, Every Girl Should be Married was a box-office winner to the tune of $775,000.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Craig Butler
Times have changed since 1948. Many romantic comedies are still built on the premise that a woman will do anything to get her man, but they're not as blatant about it as Every Girl Should Be Married. This is one of the problems with Every Girl -- it's a little too above-board about the motives of its heroine. In spite of the fact that she professes to be in love with her intended prey, it's hard to shake the feeling that what she really feels is infatuation -- and that her motivation for pursuing him has more to do with a determination to simply be married than a determination to be married to this particular individual. And when her future husband abruptly does an about-face and agrees to marry her, it not only isn't believable, it comes across as an act of pity, rather than a realization that he does indeed love her. Adding to this problem is Betsy Drake. Her performance is actually good and quite skillful, but she lacks the requisite natural spark that this kind of role demands and that puts the audience at ease. (By contrast, when Katharine Hepburn hunts Cary Grant in Bringing up Baby, it seems entirely natural, not least because something in Hepburn's being makes it seem that way.) However, there are still some good laughs in the screenplay, Grant is his usual excellent self, and the dream house Drake sets up is charming. If the viewer can get past the datedness, it's a modest little entertainment.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/06/2009
UPC:
0883316212530
Original Release:
1948
Rating:
NR
Source:
Warner Archives
Presentation:
[B&W, Full Frame]
Time:
1:25:00
Sales rank:
745

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Cary Grant Dr. Madison Brown
Franchot Tone Roger Sanford
Diana Lynn Julie Hudson
Betsy Drake Anabel Sims
Alan Mowbray Mr. Spitzer
Elizabeth Risdon Mary Nolan
Richard Gaines Sam McNutt
Harry Hayden Gogarty
Chick Chandler Soda Clerk
Leon Belasco Violinist
Fred Essler Pierre
Anna Q. Nilsson Saleslady
Jean Andren Customer
Helen Brown Dignified Woman
Joseph Granby Louis, the Barber
Kate Lawson Large Woman
Al Rhein Photographer
Elaine Riley Young Lady
Gwyn Shipman Mother
Eddie Albert Harry Proctor/'Old' Joe
Claire Du Brey Mrs. Willoughby
Dan Foster Cigar store clerk
Louise Franklin Elevator girl
James Griffith Insurance Salesman
Lois Hall Girl
Pat Hall Girl
Charmienne Harker Miss King
Carol Hughes Girl at counter
Selmar Jackson Clergyman
Anne Nagel Woman

Technical Credits
Don Hartman Director,Producer,Screenwriter
Stephen Morehouse Avery Screenwriter
Constantin Bakaleinikoff Musical Direction/Supervision
Gordon Bau Makeup
Carroll Clark Art Director
Russell A. Cully Special Effects
Albert S. D'Agostino Art Director
George E. Diskant Cinematographer
Leigh Harline Score Composer
Eleanor Harris Original Story
Harry Marker Editor
Clem Portman Sound/Sound Designer
Sam Ruman Asst. Director
Francis M. Sarver Sound/Sound Designer
Dore Schary Producer
Irene Sharaff Costumes/Costume Designer
Darrell Silvera Set Decoration/Design
William L. Stevens Set Decoration/Design

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