Every Girl Should Be Married

Overview

Cary Grant met his future wife Betsy Drake on the set of the appropriately titled Every Girl Should be Married. Grant plays well-known baby specialist Madison Brown, who is Dr. Spock in everything but name. After a chance meeting with headstrong young Anabel Sins Drake, poor Brown finds his every move and thought monitored by Anabel, who intends to become his wife come heck or high water. Upset that Brown steadfastly resists her charms, Anabel decides to make him jealous by playing up to her boss Roger Sanford ...
See more details below
Other sellers (DVD)
  • All (5) from $13.11   
  • New (5) from $13.11   
Note: This product is manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. This disc is expected to play back in DVD Video "play only" devices and may not play back in other DVD devices including recorders and PC drives.

Overview

Cary Grant met his future wife Betsy Drake on the set of the appropriately titled Every Girl Should be Married. Grant plays well-known baby specialist Madison Brown, who is Dr. Spock in everything but name. After a chance meeting with headstrong young Anabel Sins Drake, poor Brown finds his every move and thought monitored by Anabel, who intends to become his wife come heck or high water. Upset that Brown steadfastly resists her charms, Anabel decides to make him jealous by playing up to her boss Roger Sanford Franchot Tone. When Brown still won't bite, our plucky heroine mounts a campaign enlisting everybody in town to wear down the doctor's resistance. Nowadays, this is called "stalking"; in 1948, it was called "funny." Produced, directed and written by Don Hartman, Every Girl Should be Married was a box-office winner to the tune of $775,000.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Craig Butler
Times have changed since 1948. Many romantic comedies are still built on the premise that a woman will do anything to get her man, but they're not as blatant about it as Every Girl Should Be Married. This is one of the problems with Every Girl -- it's a little too above-board about the motives of its heroine. In spite of the fact that she professes to be in love with her intended prey, it's hard to shake the feeling that what she really feels is infatuation -- and that her motivation for pursuing him has more to do with a determination to simply be married than a determination to be married to this particular individual. And when her future husband abruptly does an about-face and agrees to marry her, it not only isn't believable, it comes across as an act of pity, rather than a realization that he does indeed love her. Adding to this problem is Betsy Drake. Her performance is actually good and quite skillful, but she lacks the requisite natural spark that this kind of role demands and that puts the audience at ease. (By contrast, when Katharine Hepburn hunts Cary Grant in Bringing up Baby, it seems entirely natural, not least because something in Hepburn's being makes it seem that way.) However, there are still some good laughs in the screenplay, Grant is his usual excellent self, and the dream house Drake sets up is charming. If the viewer can get past the datedness, it's a modest little entertainment.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 10/6/2009
  • UPC: 883316212530
  • Original Release: 1948
  • Rating:

  • Source: Warner Archives
  • Time: 1:25:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 18,360

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Cary Grant Dr. Madison Brown
Franchot Tone Roger Sanford
Diana Lynn Julie Hudson
Betsy Drake Anabel Sims
Alan Mowbray Mr. Spitzer
Elizabeth Risdon Mary Nolan
Richard Gaines Sam McNutt
Harry Hayden Gogarty
Chick Chandler Soda Clerk
Leon Belasco Violinist
Fred Essler Pierre
Anna Q. Nilsson Saleslady
Eddie Albert Harry Proctor/'Old' Joe
Jean Andren Customer
Helen Brown Dignified Woman
Claire Du Brey Mrs. Willoughby
Dan Foster Cigar store clerk
Louise Franklin Elevator girl
Joseph Granby Louis, the Barber
James Griffith Insurance Salesman
Lois Hall Girl
Pat Hall Girl
Charmienne Harker Miss King
Carolyn Hughes Girl at counter
Selmar Jackson Clergyman
Kate Lawson Large Woman
Anne Nagel Woman
Al Rhein Photographer
Elaine Riley Young Lady
Gwyn Shipman Mother
Technical Credits
Don Hartman Director, Producer, Screenwriter
Stephen Morehouse Avery Screenwriter
Constantin Bakaleinikoff Musical Direction/Supervision
Gordon Bau Makeup
Carroll Clark Art Director
Russell A. Cully Special Effects
Albert S. D'Agostino Art Director
George E. Diskant Cinematographer
Leigh Harline Score Composer
Eleanor Harris Original Story
Harry Marker Editor
Clem Portman Sound/Sound Designer
Sam Ruman Asst. Director
Francis M. Sarver Sound/Sound Designer
Dore Schary Producer
Irene Sharaff Costumes/Costume Designer
Darrell Silvera Set Decoration/Design
William L. Stevens Set Decoration/Design
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously