Everyday People

Everyday People

Director: Jim McKay

Cast: Jim McKay, Jordan Gelber, Bridget Barkan, Stephen Henderson

     
 

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Independent filmmaker Jim McKay (Girls Town) writes and directs the ensemble film Everyday People, produced in part by HBO Films. The story revolves around a neighborhood eatery in Brooklyn called Raskins, a Jewish-owned-and-operated restaurant with an almost exclusively black clientele. After years of faithful service, owner Ira (Jordan Gelber)…  See more details below

Overview

Independent filmmaker Jim McKay (Girls Town) writes and directs the ensemble film Everyday People, produced in part by HBO Films. The story revolves around a neighborhood eatery in Brooklyn called Raskins, a Jewish-owned-and-operated restaurant with an almost exclusively black clientele. After years of faithful service, owner Ira (Jordan Gelber) contemplates selling out to a corporation as part of the city's urban renewal. Everyday People premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2004 as part of the American Spectrum competition.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Josh Ralske
Everyday People is writer/director Jim McKay's disappointingly pedantic follow-up to the beautifully restrained and naturalistic drama Our Song. Everyday People is essentially a John Sayles-esque movie about gentrification, albeit without the requisite sociopath and with Sayles' seeming indifference to composition replaced by McKay's fairly strong, evocative visuals, courtesy of accomplished cinematographer Russell Fine, who shot McKay's first film, Girls Town. While generally well received, Girls Town was criticized for the overdetermined didacticism that McKay successfully avoided with his superb second feature, Our Song. Although ambitious in dealing with a great number of characters of widely varying ages, ethnicities, socioeconomic backgrounds, and, ostensibly, political views, Everyday People is a disappointing step backwards for the filmmaker. The film does get at the complexity of the issues involved in the closing of a Brooklyn neighborhood restaurant, and there are a couple of interactions between the characters that ring true (including the particularly touching and true-to-life stab at romance between struggling single-mother Joleen [Bridget Barkan] and college-bound Samel [Billöah Greene]). While it's impossible to deny McKay's good intentions, the filmmaker seems more interested in making his political points and subverting stereotypes than in presenting his characters as fully fleshed-out human beings or in telling a believable story.

Product Details

Release Date:
02/15/2012
UPC:
0883316440964
Original Release:
2003
Rating:
NR
Source:
Warner Archives
Sales rank:
88,853

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Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Jordan Gelber Ira
Bridget Barkan Joleen
Stephen Henderson Arthur
Sydnee Stewart Erin
Billöah Greene Samuel
Reg E. Cathey Akbar
Stephen Axelrod Sol
Ron Butler Ron
Iris Little Thomas Betty
Verno O. Hobson Actor
Warner Miller Beadle

Technical Credits
Jim McKay Director,Executive Producer,Screenwriter
Alex Hall Editor
Antonio L. Arroyo Sound/Sound Designer
Beth Bowling Casting
Effie Brown Producer
Caldecot "Cotty" Chubb Executive Producer
Sean Daniel Executive Producer
Adam Escott Asst. Director
Russell Fine Cinematographer
Nelson George Executive Producer
Sandra Hernandez Costumes/Costume Designer
Craig Lathrop Production Designer
Tracy McKnight Musical Direction/Supervision
Paul S. Mezey Producer
Kim Miscia Casting
Michael Stipe Executive Producer
Marc Anthony Thompson Score Composer

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