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Fantasia 2000
     

Fantasia 2000

 

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Initially released to IMAX theaters at the crescendo of millennial fever and 60 years after the original Fantasia, Fantasia 2000 was meant to revitalize Walt Disney's goal of a constantly evolving film, with new segments replacing old ones with each re-release. Only "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" remains, with seven new shorts. Angular, abstracted butterfly

Overview

Initially released to IMAX theaters at the crescendo of millennial fever and 60 years after the original Fantasia, Fantasia 2000 was meant to revitalize Walt Disney's goal of a constantly evolving film, with new segments replacing old ones with each re-release. Only "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" remains, with seven new shorts. Angular, abstracted butterfly-like shapes fly through the air in Beethoven's "Symphony No. 5"; computer-animated whales take flight in Respighi's "Pines of Rome"; Al Hirschfeld's caricatures of New York life come alive in George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue"; Hans Christian Andersen's "The Steadfast Tin Soldier" is retold with computer animation against Dmitri Shostakovich's "Piano Concerto No. 2, Allegro, Opus 102"; frantic flamingos try to stop their yo-yoing comrade in Camille Saint-Saëns' "Carnival of the Animals, Finale"; Donald and Daisy Duck play Noah and his wife trying to manage the ark to Sir Edward Elgar's "Pomp and Circumstance"; and the cycle of life, death, and rebirth are celebrated in Stravinsky's "Firebird Suite." ~ Emru Townsend

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Donald Liebenson
Never before has there been a 60-year gap between a film and its sequel. But the visionary late Walt Disney's dream has finally been realized in the creation of this new version of his original grand experiment: an ambitious setting of classical music to animation. Originally presented in the IMAX format, Fantasia 2000 loses little in its transfer to the smaller screen. Highlights include a stunning computer-animated sequence inspired by Respighi's Pines of Rome in which humpback whales take flight in an arctic fantasy land; Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue, realized in the style of caricaturist Al Hirschfeld; and a very silly symphony (Saint-Saens's Carnival of the Animals) in which a flamingo wreaks havoc with his new yo-yo. By popular demand, The Sorcerer's Apprentice, arguably Mickey Mouse's finest hour, is reprised. And Donald Duck gets his own Fantasia showcase in a sequence scored to Elgar's Pomp and Circumstance, in which Donald signs on as an animal wrangler on Noah's Ark. The original Fantasia is a hard act to follow, but with its diverse animation styles, kid-friendly stories, and the participation of a stellar roster of hosts that includes Steve Martin, Bette Midler, and Penn & Teller, Fantasia 2000 is perhaps even more accessible to younger viewers than its distinguished predecessor. Fantasia 2000 also appears alongside the original Fantasia, and a DVD about the making of both with never-before-seen footage in Disney's breathtaking three-DVD Fantasia Anthology.
All Movie Guide
Nearly a decade in the making, Fantasia 2000 should have been more like Fantasia 1990, a 50th anniversary celebration of the original. The "sequel" to Disney's landmark fusion of music and animation might leave some viewers wondering where all the time went. Involving without being truly memorable, Fantasia 2000 offers lush, swirling visuals in an array of different styles, varying in sophistication yet retaining the poetic aura of their source. But it sometimes feels like an antiquated idea shoehorned into a modern context, especially with the decision to reuse the corny segment introductions, featuring stars who range from the established (Steve Martin) to the fringe ("Hey, is that the guy from Penn and Teller?"). Its segments are mostly inspired schmaltz, particularly "Pines of Rome," with its whales flying majestically from their ocean beds, and "Firebird Suite," a struggle for the soul of nature starring a daughter-of-the-earth fairy. The best and liveliest sequence is "Rhapsody in Blue," with its Al Hirschfeld-style drawings of a busy Jazz Age New York; the most unfortunate, "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" from the original, looks even more grainy when stretched to the height of an IMAX screen. Because the frame needed to conform to that grandiose format, some of the film's impact is further blunted when constricted on video. These complaints may seem too unforgiving when talking about an ambitious labor of love that inspires more than enough awe. But that's only because the original was an incomparable classic, the kind of galvanizing viewing that even ten years of hard work can't duplicate.

Product Details

Release Date:
11/14/2000
UPC:
0786936136388
Original Release:
1999
Rating:
G
Source:
Walt Disney Video

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Steve Martin Narrator
Itzhak Perlman Narrator
Quincy Jones Narrator
Bette Midler Narrator
James Earl Jones Narrator
Penn Jillette Narrator
Teller Narrator
James Levine Narrator,Conductor
Angela Lansbury Narrator
Leopold Stokowski Conductor ("Sorcerer's Apprentice" segment)
Kathleen Battle Singer
Bruce Broughton Conductor

Technical Credits
James Algar Director
Gaëtan Brizzi Director,Original Story
Paul Brizzi Director,Original Story
Hendel Butoy Director
Francis Glebas Director
Eric Goldberg Director,Animator,Art Director,Screenwriter
Pixote Hunt Director,Art Director
Bruce Broughton Musical Direction/Supervision
Tom Codrick Art Director
Dan Cooper Art Director
Bruce Coughlin Musical Arrangement
Roy Edward Disney Executive Producer
Donald W. Ernst Producer
Lois Freeman-Fox Editor
Peter Gelb Executive Producer
Dean Gordon Art Director
Joe Grant Original Story
Don Hahn Production Designer,Screenwriter
Patricia Hicks Co-producer
Mary Hidalgo Casting
Michael Humphries Art Director
Carl Jones Art Director
Gregory King Sound/Sound Designer
Ruth Lambert Casting
James Levine Musical Direction/Supervision
Kendra McCool Choreography
Susan McKinsey-Goldberg Art Director
Bill Perkins Art Director
Charles Philippi Art Director
David Reynolds Screenwriter
Peter Schickele Musical Arrangement
Zack Schwartz Art Director

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