Fantastic Planet/Planete Sauvage

( 2 )

Overview

A French/Czech co-production, the dream-like La Planete Sauvage concerns the degradation of the Oms, human-like creatures on the futuristic planet Yagam. The Oms are kept as pets and beasts of burden by the Draggs, 39-foot beings who comprise Yagam's ruling class. The status quo is upset when Terr, one of the Oms, accidentally receives an education, whereupon he organizes the other Oms to demand equality with the Draggs. Based on Stefen Wul's novel Ems En Serie, Fantastic Planet was the winner of a 1973 Cannes ...
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Overview

A French/Czech co-production, the dream-like La Planete Sauvage concerns the degradation of the Oms, human-like creatures on the futuristic planet Yagam. The Oms are kept as pets and beasts of burden by the Draggs, 39-foot beings who comprise Yagam's ruling class. The status quo is upset when Terr, one of the Oms, accidentally receives an education, whereupon he organizes the other Oms to demand equality with the Draggs. Based on Stefen Wul's novel Ems En Serie, Fantastic Planet was the winner of a 1973 Cannes Film Festival grand prize.
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Special Features

Optional subtitles; English language version; Les Escargots - a short by Rene Laloux; Fantastic Laloux - an interview with Rene Laloux; Trailer; Photo gallery; Would I Be the One - music video by Sean Lennon (inspired by Fantastic Planet)
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Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide
Rarely has a titular adjective so accurately captured the experience of watching a movie as in Fantastic Planet. The film's alternate universe is both totally an element of fantasy, and fantastic in its vernacular sense: an absolute marvel to behold. Rene Laloux's animated French-language allegory takes trippiness to new levels of pure imagination, conjuring a planet where humans are both domesticated pet and outlaw nuisance to the native rulers. These rulers, the skyscraper-sized Traags, are blue humanoids with red eyes and vaguely aquatic features -- but who otherwise are pretty genial, intellectual beings. It's no coincidence we're supposed to see ourselves in them, but Fantastic Planet is no mere plea for us to trade places with the Earth creatures we so callously enslave and kill. Masterfully, Laloux's film also invites us to identify with the humans, whose spirit of determination inspires them to an against-all-odds uprising. But however many ways Fantastic Planet invites reflection, it's at least as interested in wowing its audiences with otherworldly technology, flora and fauna. The film pauses to flesh these out through atmospheric vignettes, featuring tall plants that whip the air aimlessly, intricate groves of multi-colored trees, small bulbous-eyed creatures that make clothing by foaming bubbles from their mouths, or giant winged beasts that scream in frightening bursts. (The sound design is a discussion in and of itself, consisting of excellently 1970s computerized beeps and boops, plus a soundtrack that could accompany a porn movie from that era, without that being the least bit silly). The Traags are a fully realized entity both familiar and unsettlingly foreign -- when their meditations carry them skyward in enclose bubbles, it's breathtaking. The one complaint is that the spell is broken slightly by the dispassionate and largely unnecessary narration of the lead character, reflecting on events after the fact, which tends to distance us from the bizarre immediacy of the story. Fantastic Planet is showing us so much, it doesn't need to tell us anything.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 10/23/2007
  • UPC: 736899110925
  • Original Release: 1973
  • Source: Accent Cinema
  • Region Code: 1
  • Language: Français
  • Time: 1:12:00
  • Format: DVD
  • Sales rank: 2,314

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Barry Bostwick Terror
Mark Gruner
Nora Heflin
Marvin Miller
Monika Ramirez
Hal Smith
Olan Soule
Janet Waldo
Technical Credits
René Laloux Director, Screenwriter
Boris Baromykin Cinematographer
Jindrick Barta Animator
Zdena Bartova Animator
Simon Damiani Producer
Anatole Dauman Producer
Dick Elliott Editor
Alain Goraguer Score Composer
Rich Harrison Editor
Steve Hayes Screenwriter
Josef Kabrt Animator, Art Director
Lubomir Rejthar Cinematographer
Bohumil Sedja Animator
Zdenek Sob Animator
Karel Strebl Animator
Roland Topor Production Designer, Screenwriter
Andre Valio-Cavaglione Producer
Josef Vanan Animator
Jiri Vokoum Animator
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Scene Index

Disc #1 -- Fantastic Planet
1. Chapter 1 [:10]
3. Chapter 2 [7:03]
4. Chapter 3 [3:03]
5. Chapter 4 [7:57]
6. Chapter 5 [6:44]
7. Chapter 6 [10:11]
8. Chapter 7 [9:02]
9. Chapter 8 [11:07]
10. Chapter 9 [13:17]
11. Chapter 10 [2:05]
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Menu

Disc #1 -- Fantastic Planet
   Play Movie
   Chapter Index
   Special Features
      Fantastic Laloux
      Les Escargots
      Music Video: "Would I Be the One" by Sean Lennon
      Trailer
      Photo Gallery
      English Subtitles: On
      English Subtitles: Off
      English Language: On
      English Language: Off
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A reviewer

    Imagine Spartacus, combined with Star Trek & Karl Marx as a psychodelic cartoon. Only the early 1970's could have produced this fantasticly funky French sci-fi animated epic. On a distant planet, an oppressed race of tiny humans revolts against its giant masters.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Abundance of creativity

    If you are into sci-fi and have an open mind, this is the flick for you no matter what your age.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews