Fastpitch

( 1 )

Overview

Jeremy Spear is a noted sculptor and conceptual artist who has developed an estimable reputation on New York's downtown art scene. Spear is also an avid sports enthusiast who played shortstop on Yale's baseball team as they made the NCAA finals in the early 1980s. In the late 1990s, a friend asked Spear if he was interested in playing fast-pitch softball on a semi-pro team in Ohio, and soon he was introduced to what he calls "America's last barnstorming sport," which is far removed from both the casual amateur ...
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Overview

Jeremy Spear is a noted sculptor and conceptual artist who has developed an estimable reputation on New York's downtown art scene. Spear is also an avid sports enthusiast who played shortstop on Yale's baseball team as they made the NCAA finals in the early 1980s. In the late 1990s, a friend asked Spear if he was interested in playing fast-pitch softball on a semi-pro team in Ohio, and soon he was introduced to what he calls "America's last barnstorming sport," which is far removed from both the casual amateur play of slow-pitch softball and the big money and glamour of major league baseball. Fastpitch is a documentary Spear made during his season with the Abbott Labs team, based in Ashland, OH (most American fast-pitch teams are sponsored by businesses), and takes a look at the colorful characters (would-be pro baseballers, Maori immigrants from New Zealand, Native American activists, and eccentric Southern millionaires) who populate a sport where, in an age of multimillion-dollar big league contracts, no one makes much money and the legends of the sport are all but unknown. Fastpitch was named Best Feature Documentary at the 2000 Nashville Independent Film Festival.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 6/26/2001
  • UPC: 767685554531
  • Original Release: 2000
  • Rating:

  • Source: New Video Group
  • Format: VHS

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Jeremy Spear
Technical Credits
Jeremy Spear Director, Producer, Screenwriter
Juliet Weber Director, Screenwriter
Fred Kaufman Screenwriter
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A very good introduction to a great game

    This is a fantastic effort to capture the purity of the sport. I have played and coached men's fastpitch for many years and have seen the sport's popularity decline due to many of the issues that Spear brings to light. The film gives a fair (if somewhat overly optimistic) treatment to the subject of this lost American pastime. Some will undoubtedly question the glowing nature of many of the portrayals, but the film is true to the spirit of the game. Having met Jeremy Spear once, I can atest to his passion for the game. He is still out there getting dirty every year and that is more than most of the people sitting around complaining about the state of the game can say. If more people would, like Mr. Spear, make the effort to expose our game to the masses, maybe men's fastpitch would return to the public conciousness. There is a good deal of action footage that captures the game being played at it's highest level. No offense to the girl's, but 70mph pitches are change-ups in the men's game. How about 85mph from 46 feet? All in all, he captures the beauty of a game that, while struggling to stay alive, is still a pure representation of the ideals of American sport.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews