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Fellini's Roma
     

Fellini's Roma

4.5 2
Director: Federico Fellini, Britta Barnes, Anna Magnani, Pia de Doses

Cast: Federico Fellini, Britta Barnes, Anna Magnani, Pia de Doses

 

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Fellini's Roma is a virtually plotless autobiographical tribute to Rome, Italy, featuring narration by Fellini himself and a mixture of real-life footage and fictional set pieces. It flows from episode to episode, beginning with the director's early years arriving in Rome in 1931 during the time of Mussolini. Played by Stefano Mayore as a child, he visits the

Overview

Fellini's Roma is a virtually plotless autobiographical tribute to Rome, Italy, featuring narration by Fellini himself and a mixture of real-life footage and fictional set pieces. It flows from episode to episode, beginning with the director's early years arriving in Rome in 1931 during the time of Mussolini. Played by Stefano Mayore as a child, he visits the city with classmates and becomes infatuated. Played by Peter Gonzales at age 18, the young Fellini moves in to a tenement building and explores the wild characters living in neighborhood. The events that follow switch between the past and contemporary times, including a story line that involves a 1970s film crew making a movie about Rome. He also incorporates segments of Roman history and problems in the government, including an improvised speech from Gore Vidal. Throughout this journey there are visits to an outdoor restaurant, a movie theater, a music hall, and a brothel. In one famously surreal segment, groups of clergymen gather together for a Catholic fashion show spectacle. After a visit to a street festival and some on-camera interviews, the film concludes with shots of motorcycles driving by the Colosseum.

Editorial Reviews

All Movie Guide - Lucia Bozzola
Fellini's Roma is precisely the kind of cinematic valentine to the Eternal City that only Federico Fellini could create. Fellini's personal journey through the city of his 1930s youth and the freak show, traffic-clogged 1970s present, Roma fondly lingers over the Felliniesque carnival of characters populating family dinners, theater audiences, brothels, and street parties. Fellini himself appears on film orchestrating the contemporary crew. Accurately summed up on camera by Gore Vidal as "the city of illusions," Fellini turns Rome's Catholic ritualism into an opulent ecclesiastical fashion show, while the subway construction sequence and the final, nocturnal tour of the ruins via motorcycle find surreal beauty in the potentially destructive juxtaposition of ancient and modern Rome. Reportedly disdained by Romans, Roma was nevertheless greeted by critics as a welcome return to the nostalgia and astute commentary of such early masterworks as I Vitelloniand La Dolce Vita. Fellini would merge nostalgia and surrealist fantasy even more fruitfully in Amarcord. Anna Magnani's cameo as herself, urging Fellini to go home and go to sleep, was her final screen appearance. Cameos by Marcello Mastroianni and Alberto Sordi were cut from the English language version.

Product Details

Release Date:
12/13/2016
UPC:
0715515190817
Original Release:
1972
Rating:
R
Source:
Criterion
Region Code:
A
Presentation:
[Wide Screen]
Time:
2:00:00
Sales rank:
584

Special Features

2K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack; Audio Commentary featuring Frank Burke, author of Fellini's Films; Deleted Scenes; New interview with filmmaker Paolo Sorrentino on the lasting influence of Director Federico Fellini; New interview with poet and Fellini friend Valerio Magrelli; Images from the Felliniana archive of collector Don Young; Trailer; Plus: An essay by film scholar David Forgacs

Cast & Crew

Performance Credits
Britta Barnes Actor
Federico Fellini Himself
Anna Magnani Actor
Pia de Doses The Princess
Angela de Leo Actor
Mario del Vago Actor
John Francis Lane Actor
Elisa Mainardi Actor
Marne Maitland Underground Guide
Mimmo Poli Actor
Gore Vidal Actor
Fiona Florence Young Prostitute
Renato Giovanneli Cardinal Ottaviani
Pedro Gonzales Fellini at age 18
Stefano Majore Fellini as a Child
Marcello Mastroianni Himself
Cassandra Peterson Actor
Galliano Sbarra Music Hall Compere
Alberto Sordi Himself
Alvaro Vitali Tap Dancer Imitating Fred Astaire

Technical Credits
Federico Fellini Director,Screenwriter
Rino Carboni Makeup
Danilo Donati Costumes/Costume Designer,Production Designer
Andrea Fantacci Set Decoration/Design
Gino Landi Choreography
Ruggero Mastroianni Editor
Adriano Pischiutta Special Effects
Nino Rota Score Composer
Giuseppe Rotunno Cinematographer
Carlo Savina Musical Direction/Supervision
Turi Vasile Producer
Bernardino Zapponi Screenwriter

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Fellini's Roma 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fellini's film Roma should not be watched from the viewpoint of seeing another 8 1/2 or La Strata. Roma is similar to Satyricon; a collection of scenes, metaphors and sick absurdity, all conglomerated in a nonfigurative opus. Some great sections to Roma: an underground passageway displayed with ancient murals; a bordello that features a young Fellini himself; a meeting with Gore Vidal on a veranda; & an outrageous modeling of the Roman Catholic Church, catwalk & all.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago