Femme Nikita/Run Lola Run

Femme Nikita/Run Lola Run

5.0 1
     
 

The serpentine plotline of Luc Besson's La Femme Nikita begins its 117-minute slither when punkish, psychotic, and drug-ridden Nikita (Anne Parillaud) fires her gun into a cop's face following the stick-up of a drug store, and is promptly imprisoned. She is thrown into a dank cell, then injected with a substance and told it is a lethal toxin. Instead of dying,See more details below

Overview

The serpentine plotline of Luc Besson's La Femme Nikita begins its 117-minute slither when punkish, psychotic, and drug-ridden Nikita (Anne Parillaud) fires her gun into a cop's face following the stick-up of a drug store, and is promptly imprisoned. She is thrown into a dank cell, then injected with a substance and told it is a lethal toxin. Instead of dying, however, the comes to in an all-white interrogation room, where French intelligence officer Bob (Tchéky Karyo), informs her that an alternate to execution exists: she can receive covert government training as an assassin. She accepts the bid, is rigorously trained, and later returns to society as a seemingly normal and gentle civilian, but falls in love with a drugstore employee while she's waiting for that first government assignment. The paradoxical concept of a young woman blossoming socially while carrying out cold-blooded murders was downplayed when La Femme Nikita was remade in America as the silly and disappointing Point of No Return, directed by John Badham with Bridget Fonda in the lead. A far less sociopathic TV-series version of La Femme Nikita surfaced on the USA cable network in early 1997.Tom Tykwer directed this German thriller in which Manni (Moritz Bleibtreu) handled a smuggling job, delivered the loot, collected the payment, left the bag on the subway, and now has 20 minutes to gather 100,000 deutsche marks or confront the wrath of his boss, local criminal Ronnie (Heino Ferch). Desperate, Manni phones his girlfriend Lola (Franka Potente) who immediately runs downstairs and through Berlin streets to the bank run by her father (Herbert Knaup). However, she's rejected and leaves minus money. When she goes to meet Manni, he's holding up a supermarket, and she's shot by the cops. In a destiny device familiar to readers of Ken Grimwood's acclaimed novel Replay, the story begins anew with different outcomes. In one version, Lola robs the bank and takes her father hostage; in another, there's casino cash to be won. All Lola-Manni scenes were in 35mm, while scenes without them were shot in video. Other cinematic techniques on display here include whip pans, jump cuts, slow and fast motion, split-screen, intercut color and black and white, segment titles, and animation. Shown at 1998 film fests (Venice, Montreal, Toronto).

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Gregory Baird
Lola's predicament is simple and dire: She has 20 minutes to come up with 100,000 marks or her boyfriend, Manni (Moritz Bleibtreu), is a dead man. It's a tall order (considering that she's broke and unemployed), but the rest of Run Lola Run proves that a lot can happen in 20 minutes, as Lola (Franka Potente) sprints desperately through Berlin. Lola's mad dash to accomplish the apparently impossible through sheer force of will is accompanied by a superb -- and relentless -- techno score. Along the way, director Tom Tykwer pulls out all cinematic stops, mixing 35mm and video, color and black and white, using pans and dolly shots, fast motion, slow motion, split screen, and even animation, while Tykwer's story explores alternate realities in which the future hinges on the slightest variations in chance encounters. Surprisingly taut and incredibly fun, Tykwer's ultra-fast-paced little odyssey is a terrific ride of a movie.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/05/2010
UPC:
0043396360457
Source:
Sony Pictures
Region Code:
ABC
Time:
3:17:00
Sales rank:
73,565

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >